Bipolar disorder and addiction

If you are grappling with bipolar disorder, you will already be well aware of the profound impact it can have on a person’s life. Bipolar disorder is one of the most complex and misunderstood mental health conditions, characterised by extreme fluctuations in mood, energy and ability to function. The intensity of bipolar disorder can be overwhelming enough on its own, but when accompanied by addiction, the challenges can multiply exponentially. This dual diagnosis can make you feel as if you’re trapped in an endless cycle of despair, but it is crucial to understand that there is hope. Professional support and treatment from UKAT can lead to meaningful recovery, enabling you to overcome addiction and simultaneously develop strategies to manage bipolar disorder better.

What is bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic depression, is a mental health condition marked by extreme mood swings. These include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression), which can last for weeks or even months in some cases.

There are three main types of bipolar disorder, which affect around 1.3 million people in the UK alone:

Bipolar I disorder

This type is defined by manic episodes lasting at least seven days or by manic symptoms that are so severe that immediate hospital care is needed. Depressive episodes also occur, typically lasting at least two weeks. Sometimes, symptoms of mania and depression can coexist in a mixed episode.

Bipolar II disorder

Bipolar II is characterised by a pattern of depressive episodes and hypomanic episodes but not the full-blown manic episodes that are typical of Bipolar I disorder. Hypomania is a less severe form of mania and may not lead to the same level of disruption as mania.

Cyclothymic disorder

Also known as Cyclothymia, this disorder involves periods of hypomanic symptoms and periods of depressive symptoms lasting for at least two years (one year in children and adolescents). However, the symptoms do not meet the diagnostic requirements for a hypomanic episode and a depressive episode.

What are common bipolar disorder symptoms and signs?

Bipolar Disorder can affect various aspects of your life, including your energy level, activity, judgement, behaviour and the ability to think clearly. Common bipolar disorder symptoms include:

During manic episodes

  • Feelings of euphoria
  • Inflated self-esteem
  • Poor judgement
  • Rapid speech
  • Racing thoughts
  • Aggressive behaviour
  • Agitation or irritation
  • Increased physical activity
  • Risky behaviour
  • Spending sprees or unwise financial decisions
  • A reduced need for sleep
  • During depressive episodes

  • Feelings of sadness and/or hopelessness
  • Suicidal thoughts or behaviour
  • Anxiety
  • Guilt
  • Sleep problems
  • Low appetite or increased appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of interest in activities once considered enjoyable
  • Problems concentrating
  • Irritability
  • Chronic pain without a known cause
  • If you notice these symptoms or signs of bipolar disorder in yourself or someone you know, it is worth getting a professional diagnosis to check whether you need professional treatment and support.

    How do co-occurring bipolar disorder and addiction develop?

    The interplay between bipolar disorder and addiction is complex. Often, people with bipolar disorder turn to drugs or alcohol as a way to self-medicate and cope with their bipolar disorder symptoms. Unfortunately, substance abuse usually exacerbates the condition, leading to a worsening of symptoms and often triggering manic or depressive episodes. The cycle of addiction and mental health problems then becomes entrenched over time, making each condition more difficult to treat.

    At UKAT, we have seen various forms of addiction co-occurring with bipolar disorder, including:

    Drug addiction and bipolar disorder

    The use of drugs as a form of self-medication is common among individuals with bipolar disorder. For example, stimulants may be used during depressive episodes to enhance mood or energy levels, while depressants may be used to calm manic episodes. Ultimately, through prolonged use, individuals can become reliant on these substances to manage bipolar disorder symptoms, which can quickly lead to addiction.

    Bipolar disorder alcohol addiction

    Those with Bipolar Disorder often use alcohol to alleviate discomfort from their symptoms. However, alcohol use, particularly heavy or chronic drinking, can exacerbate mood instability and depressant effects, complicating the course of the disorder. This then leads to more alcohol use to try and temper these intensified symptoms, creating a cycle of addiction.

    Bipolar and sex addiction

    Some individuals with bipolar disorder may engage in hypersexual behaviour, particularly during manic phases. This can manifest as sex addiction, where the pursuit of sexual activity becomes compulsive and detrimental to daily functioning and relationships.

    Bipolar and gambling addiction

    Gambling addiction in the context of Bipolar Disorder often occurs during manic episodes as heightened impulsivity and risk-taking behaviours lead to compulsive gambling. This can provide temporary relief, but when gambling addiction develops, it only further complicates an already complicated situation.

    Bipolar and love addiction

    With love addiction, individuals with Bipolar Disorder might experience an intense and obsessive preoccupation with a romantic partner, especially during manic or hypomanic phases. This can result in a pattern of unstable relationships and emotional turmoil, exacerbating the challenges of managing Bipolar Disorder.

    What does treatment for bipolar disorder and addiction involve?

    At UKAT, we understand that the complexities of co-occurring mental health and addiction issues require a carefully designed, professionally administered treatment plan. Our rehab centres offer comprehensive addiction treatment, which also helps our clients manage co-occurring conditions like bipolar disorder. Our exclusive UKAT London Clinic can go beyond this, specialising in bespoke treatment programmes for addiction, bipolar disorder and dual diagnosis. Our rehab treatment approaches include:

    One-to-one therapy
    These sessions will focus on how bipolar disorder and addiction interact in your life and how mood swings may trigger substance use and vice versa. Together with your therapist, you will develop coping strategies for managing both conditions, with a special emphasis on recognising triggers and stabilising mood swings to prevent relapse.
    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
    CBT involves identifying thought patterns that lead to mood instability and substance abuse and learning techniques to replace them with healthier alternatives. This approach will help you manage the impulsivity often seen in bipolar disorder, reducing the likelihood of turning to substances as a coping mechanism.
    Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT)
    DBT is particularly effective for helping you manage the intense emotions associated with bipolar disorder. It teaches skills for regulating emotions and reducing the urge to self-medicate with substances, addressing the core issues of both conditions.
    Group therapy
    In group therapy, you will connect with others who are also navigating the complexities of addiction and mental health conditions. This shared experience allows for deeper understanding and support and will introduce you to strategies that have worked for others in similar situations.
    Meditation and mindfulness
    Practising meditation and mindfulness can be incredibly beneficial for stabilising mood and improving impulse control, crucial in managing both bipolar disorder and addiction. These techniques will help you stay grounded and present, reducing the likelihood of engaging in substance abuse as a response to mood swings.
    Trauma-based therapy
    Many individuals with Bipolar Disorder and addiction have a history of trauma, but these therapies focus on addressing these underlying issues. By processing and healing from past trauma, you can break the cycle of using substances to cope with the painful memories.
    Art therapy
    Art therapy offers a powerful way for you to express complex emotions related to bipolar disorder and addiction. It provides a non-verbal outlet to explore feelings like frustration, sadness or euphoria, which are often difficult to articulate but are central to your experiences.
    Sound therapy
    Sound therapy aims to harmonise your emotional state, which can often be erratic due to bipolar disorder. It can help in soothing mood swings and reducing the stress that can lead to substance use.
    Aftercare
    Our aftercare programme involves weekly group therapy tailored to support your ongoing journey. These sessions provide a platform for continuous learning and support, focusing on long-term strategies for maintaining both bipolar stability and sobriety.

    Start the journey to a whole new life today

    Embarking on the journey of recovery from bipolar disorder and addiction can be daunting, but it is a path filled with infinite hope and possibility. At UKAT, we are committed to providing the support and care necessary to navigate this journey successfully. Our comprehensive approach to treatment is designed to address your unique challenges, offering a foundation for long-term recovery and a more stable, fulfilling life. Remember, you’re not alone in this; we are here to guide you every step of the way. Contact UKAT to start your journey to a whole new life today.

    Call us now for help

    FAQ’s

    How much alcohol causes addiction?
    There is no exact amount of alcohol that can cause addiction, and not everyone who abuses alcohol may go on to develop alcoholism. However, regularly drinking more than the recommended weekly allowance of fourteen units may increase your risk.
    How many days to get over alcohol addiction?
    This is a tricky question to answer as it depends on how severe your addiction is and how you respond to treatment. It varies from one person to the next.
    How alcohol addiction starts?
    Alcohol addiction begins with experimentation and progresses through the stages of abuse, problem drinking, and dependency before becoming an addiction.
    Will rehab cure alcohol addiction?
    There is currently no “cure” for alcohol addiction. It can be treated and effectively managed though.
    How can alcohol addiction be treated?
    Alcohol addiction is treated with a combination of detox and rehabilitation. Comprehensive recovery programmes might include the use of medication, talking therapies, and holistic treatments.
    Can you beat alcohol addiction?
    While alcohol addiction is not a curable illness, it is possible to overcome it and go on to live a long and healthy substance-free life.
    Can you die from alcohol addiction?
    If alcohol addiction is not treated, it could progress to the point of developing life-threatening illnesses. Alcohol poisoning can occur when you consume a large amount of alcohol over a short period, possibly resulting in coma or death.
    What causes alcohol addiction?
    There is no single cause of alcoholism. There are a few risk factors that can increase the risk including a family history of addiction, traumatic experiences, and early exposure to alcohol.
    What medication is used for alcohol addiction?
    Medication can include replacement drugs such as lorazepam or phenobarbital, which are administered in tapering doses to help with alcohol withdrawals. Drugs such as Naltrexone, Disulfiram or Acamprosate can help prevent a return to alcohol use.
    How does alcohol addiction affect the family?
    It can have a devastating impact on everyone close to you and lead to some family members developing co-dependency. This could lead to your loved one sacrificing happiness or changing behaviour in response to your illness.
    Why is there no cure for Alcoholism?

    Although alcoholism is an illness of the brain, unlike other illnesses, there is currently no cure for it. When an alcohol addiction is present, the brain is physically altered by the act of chronic alcohol abuse; certain pathways in the brain are altered or damaged. It is this damage that cannot be undone.

    While it is possible to ‘rewire’ the brain around recovery, the risk of a return to addictive behaviour will always be present. However, just because alcoholism cannot be cured does not mean that it cannot be effectively treated and managed. It is, therefore, possible to live an alcohol-free life without ever experiencing a return to alcohol use.

    What treatment is most effective?

    It is difficult to say which treatment is most effective when it comes to alcohol recovery as everyone is different and each person has different needs in terms of alcohol treatment. The same treatment is therefore not going to be effective for everyone.

    It is generally accepted that a comprehensive programme of recovery needs to incorporate detox, rehabilitation, and aftercare. Within that, various therapies and medications may be used, but each person will be provided with a plan of treatment that is expected to be most effective for his or her specific needs and circumstances.

    How does a dual diagnosis affect a person?
    Dual diagnosis scenarios affect different people in different ways. In most cases though, the co-occurring disorders are made worse the longer they are ignored.
    Can I force my alcoholic parent to get help?

    No, your parents must make the decision to do so.

    How do I help my alcoholic parent?

    Educate yourself and be ready to provide information to your parent should it be requested.

    What is a high-functioning alcoholic?

    A high-functioning alcoholic is one who still maintain a norm

    When is it considered alcoholism?

    An alcohol problem is considered alcoholism when a person can no longer control his or her drinking.

    How do I know if my parent is an alcoholic?

    Alcoholism exhibits certain signs or symptoms. Learn them and look for them.

    How can family members help a person whose drinking is out of control?

    Family members can express their feelings and concerns. They can also gather treatment information and have it ready.

    If my parent is an alcoholic will I be one too?

    Having an alcoholic does not mean you will become one too. Support is available to help you avoid alcohol abuse.

    How does alcoholism affect families?

    Alcoholism upsets family relationships, causes financial problems, disrupts learning among kids, and contributes to family violence.

    What if a parent does not see a problem?

    All you can do is continue to be supportive and talk to your parent when you can.

    Why do I feel so bad?

    Your bad feelings are a combination of feeling sorry for your parent and guilt, as though you have caused the problem. Such feelings are normal.

    What can I do?

    You can educate yourself, reach out to other adults in your life, and get in touch with NACOA and UKAT.

    How do you approach a parent about an alcohol problem?

    With knowledge and compassion. You talk about your own feelings and your concern for your parent.

    What do you do if the parent refuses help?

    You focus on your own well-being and continue to offer your support. There is nothing more you can do.

    How much does alcohol rehab cost?

    The question of cost is always a factor when searching for the best private rehab clinic. Some of the most budget-friendly clinics are very affordable for most budgets. Of course, there are also luxury rehab clinics on the other end of the spectrum along with plenty of moderate level options in between. Choosing a clinic which doesn’t stretch your budget is helpful when you want to find the best rehab for your needs.

    In terms of payment, most private health insurance plans cover drug and alcohol treatment to some extent. The question is whether your chosen clinic accepts health insurance. Clinics are known to also accept debit and credit cards as well as cash payments. Do not be afraid to ask about any other payment methods you might be interested in.

    What’s the withdrawal process like?

    Withdrawal from alcohol is different for everyone. How long you have been using alcohol, how heavily you use it, and how often will all play a role in how your detox progresses. It is highly likely that you will experience some withdrawal symptoms, but it is impossible to predict which ones and how severe these will be in advance.

    What we can guarantee is that when you detox in one of our clinics, you will be completely safe and comfortable throughout.

    Are there alcohol rehabs for teens?

    It is difficult to imagine that teenagers might need rehab programmes, but it does happen. It is important that any alcohol problem is tackled as soon as possible regardless of age. If you are interested in alcohol rehab for a teenager relative or friend, speak to us here at UKAT and we will provide information on the options available.

    Does alcohol abuse treatment work?

    Treatment for alcohol abuse and addiction can be very effective provided you are committed to working with counsellors and therapists and that the programme has been designed with your specific requirements in mind.

    If you are prepared to make major lifestyle changes and have a real desire to succeed, there is no reason why alcohol abuse treatment will not work for you.

    How long does inpatient alcohol rehabilitation take?

    It is important for you to know how long treatment programmes at various facilities last. This is essential information on many levels, beginning with the fact that you might need to make plans based on the length of stay. You might have to take time off from work, for example.

    The length of treatment is also important inasmuch as data shows that duration of stay is related to the success of rehab. The longer a person participates in rehab, the greater his or her chances of maintaining abstinence once treatment is complete.
    It is difficult to predict exactly how long your treatment programme will last, but inpatient programmes usually run for between four and twelve weeks. If you are responding well to treatment and do not have complex needs, a 4-week stay might be sufficient. Nevertheless, if you have been struggling with more than one addiction or also have a mental health illness, your stay may be longer.

    Do I need to take medication?

    Whether medication is administered or not during your detox or rehab programme will be determined by your needs and by the doctor in attendance. It might be the case that your addiction is severe meaning that there is a strong possibility of you experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms. In this case, one of our doctors might prescribe a sedative replacement drug to reduce the risk of symptoms.

    How to find the right treatment centre for you?

    Finding the right treatment centre can be tough when you don’t know what your needs are or if you have no idea what to look for in a rehab centre. The good news is that you can get help from many different sources.

    You can speak to your GP for information on the programmes offered by the NHS or local charities, or you can contact us for information about our programmes and how they might benefit you. Having an assessment of your situation will give you a clearer understanding of what you are dealing with and the type of treatment centre that is best for you and your requirements.

    What to look for in an alcohol rehab?

    There are a number of things that you should be looking for in a good alcohol rehab provider. A good client-to-staff ratio is necessary to maximise personalised care. Your search for the best rehab facility should include only those facilities that are both licenced and accredited. Licencing indicates that a rehab centre is in compliance with all government regulations covering everything from the quality of care to business operations. Accreditation signifies that a rehab centre meets or exceeds a certain set of standards set by recognised accrediting organisations.

    Together with licenced and accredited facilities are staff members who are also licenced and certified. Obviously, doctors, nurses, and therapists will have to be licenced in order to work at a private rehab clinic. It is also important that they are certified in the kinds of treatments they will be offering. Support staff may also need certification in certain areas.

    Can hypnosis help an alcoholic?

    Hypnotherapy is commonly used as part of a recovery programme for alcoholism. This type of treatment can relax the mind and leave it open to suggestion. Hypnotherapists can access the subconscious brain while a person is in this state of relaxation but still fully aware of what is happening around him or her. It can be used to help with relapse prevention.

    How to help an alcoholic without enabling them

    There is a very fine line between helping an alcoholic and enabling this person. If you want to help an alcoholic loved one, for example, it is important not to be helping in such a way as to make it easier for him or her to continue with the addictive behaviour. Try not to give money to a person with alcoholism even if he or she tells you that it is needed for food or to pay bills.

    Suggest that you will help by accompanying him or her to the doctor, or by finding out all you can about treatment for the illness.

    How to convince an alcoholic to get help

    You are probably already aware that you cannot force someone with alcoholism to get help if this person is not ready, but you can try to convince him or her that this help is required. Talk to the person and explain the harm that his or her actions are causing to their life and the lives of others. Remind him or her of the importance of getting help and, if necessary, issue an ultimatum. However, if you do this, it is important that you are prepared to follow through on it.

    How to help someone married to an alcoholic

    Spouses often suffer greatly because of their partner’s alcoholism. They have to live with the chaotic and unpredictable behaviour constantly, and they may be suffering both verbal and physical abuse. He or she may be taking over the responsibilities of the alcoholic spouse and trying to forgive behaviour that, to others, might appear unforgivable. If you are worried that someone you care for is married to an alcoholic, you can help by providing love and support. Speak to the affected individual and tell him or her about Al-Anon, the family support group that gives advice and information for the loved ones of alcoholics.

    How to help an alcoholic with no money

    Alcoholics often struggle with money because they spend every available penny funding their habit. They may then beg and plead with loved ones and friends for money to either pay for bills and food or so that they can continue with their downward spiral of alcohol abuse. Giving money to an alcoholic is, therefore, a bad idea as it only enables him or her to further continue with the addictive behaviour.

    It is better to offer love and support and provide information that will help the person to get better.

    How to help an alcoholic when they relapse

    If an alcoholic you know relapses after a programme of rehabilitation, you should not see it as the end of the world. Nor should you express disapproval or judgement. This person is in need of immediate help and will probably be feeling bad enough already. Getting help for him or her at this point can be the difference between a slip-up and a full-blown return to alcohol use. Call us here at UKAT for advice on what to do if you find yourself in this situation.

    How to help an alcoholic help themselves

    The best way to help an alcoholic help him or herself is to offer love and support. Be positive and support him or her through the ups and downs, however difficult this may be. You might have heard the saying ‘you have to be cruel to be kind’; when it comes to helping alcoholics, this is so true. Do not give the affected individual money or any other help that might enable him or her to continue abusing alcohol. You may find that the only way to encourage the person to help themselves is to ensure they are held to account for their actions.

    Will quitting alcohol help me lose weight?

    Most people with alcoholism get many of their calories from alcohol, calories that have no nutritional benefit. These are known as empty calories and can lead to weight gain. If you quit alcohol and develop a healthy eating and exercise routine, you will almost certainly lose weight.

    Will quitting alcohol lower my blood pressure?

    Alcohol has been linked to increased blood pressure, so it is highly likely that if you quit alcohol and keep fit and active, your blood pressure will lower.

    Can quitting alcohol make you tired?

    When you quit alcohol, your body will try to get back to normal, which can take its toll and make you, among other things, feel tired you feel tired. Nevertheless, these feelings of fatigue will pass and after a few weeks, you will find that you are sleeping better and will have more energy. If you continue to feel tired after a month or two, talk to your doctor.

    Can quitting alcohol kill you?

    There are certain circumstances where severe withdrawal symptoms during an alcohol detox can be life-threatening. It is for this reason that you should never quit alcohol without supervision and why you should consider doing so in a supervised facility where steps can be taken to prevent the worst symptoms from occurring.

    Can you stop drinking alcohol cold turkey?

    In a detox facility, you will quit alcohol cold turkey. You will have your last drink and wait while your body expels all remaining traces of alcohol from your system. With careful supervision, you will be safe and comfortable throughout the process.

    Are there tablets to stop drinking alcohol?

    Certain medications can help with alcohol withdrawal and sobriety maintenance. Some of these medications can be taken as replacement drugs in tapering doses to help ease any withdrawal symptoms. Others are taken as part of ongoing maintenance to help with relapse prevention. These are drugs that can make you feel unwell should you drink alcohol.

    How to Stop Drinking Alcohol Home Remedies?

    There are some home remedies that you can try to help you stop drinking. For example, if you are feeling the urge to drink alcohol, you may find that grape juice is a great alternative. Eating apples is also thought to help curb the urge to drink or concocting a drink of bitter gourd juice with buttermilk not only helps curb cravings but it also repairs liver cells damaged due to your alcohol abuse.

    How to know when to stop drinking alcohol?

    If your alcohol use has started to have a negative impact on daily life, then it is time to act. You do not have to wait until you are in danger of losing all that you hold dear before you reach out for help. The sooner you get help, the sooner you can regain control of your life.

    Can alcohol induce depression?
    Studies have shown a definite link between alcohol use and the occurrence of depressive symptoms. Chronic alcohol abuse can lead to the development of depression due to a drop-in serotonin levels in the brain.
    Does depression drive you to drinking?
    Some people with depression may drink alcohol to help relieve the symptoms of their mental health disorder. It is well known that alcohol can help to change mood due to it being a depressant. However, high levels of alcohol can cause the pleasant feelings associated with alcohol use to be replaced by aggression, anger, and depression.
    Are genes or lifestyle to blame?

    Genes and lifestyle can contribute to both depression and alcohol abuse developing. It is thought that a family history of addiction or mental health problems can raise the risk of similar problems developing.

    There is also evidence to suggest that lifestyle factors such as having a stressful job or eating a poor diet can increase the risk of either alcohol abuse or depression.

    How does depression affectwomen?
    After puberty, the risk of depression is twice as likely in girls than it is in boys; before that, the risk is similar for both sexes. It is thought that changes in hormones are the cause of the increased risk in women. Hormones fluctuate throughout a woman’s life due to puberty, pregnancy, menopause, and the monthly menstrual cycle. Certain types of depression are directly linked to these times, such as premenstrual syndrome, pre- and post-natal depression, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.
    Can you prevent alcohol withdrawal?

    No, your body will go through alcohol withdrawal if you are dependent on alcohol and stop drinking.

    Can you die from alcohol withdrawal?

    Yes, it is possible to die during alcohol withdrawal. Death is extremely rare, though.

    What should you eat during alcohol detox?

    Eat healthy foods like fruits and vegetable that give your body the nutrients it needs to get through this taxing process.

    What can you expect during detox?

    During detox you can expect to feel at least somewhat uncomfortable. Your symptoms will vary depending on the severity of your condition.

    How does it take to detox from alcohol?

    The average time for detox is between 7 and 10 days.

    How long does a person stay off alcohol after a detox?

    A combination of aftercare services, group support, and the support of friends and family is what makes it possible to stay off alcohol after detox.

    Why should I enter an alcohol detox programme?

    Professionally administered detox gives you the best chances of recovery by offering you a medically supervised procedure based on the latest treatment models.

    What is a binge drinker vs an alcoholic?

    A binge drinker is someone who drinks excessively at specific times but is not dependent on alcohol. An alcoholic is a person whose body and mind are dependent.

    Is there a distinction between moderation and abstinence?

    Experts recommend moderation to people who misuse alcohol but who are not dependent on it. Moderation is not an option for alcoholics. The only real ‘cure’ for alcoholism is abstinence.

    Why is it necessary to detox properly from alcohol?

    A person dependent on alcohol is suffering from a condition in which both the body and mind rely on alcohol. Detoxification is necessary in order to restore the body’s proper functioning.

    Are withdrawal symptoms different for different people?

    People respond differently to the withdrawal process. Some exhibit all the classic signs of withdrawal while others exhibit only a few of them. Symptom severity also varies from one person to the next.

    How important is medically supervised detox?

    It is very important. Due to the potentially serious consequences of alcohol withdrawal, we always recommend medically supervised detox.

    Are alcohol rehabs private and confidential?

    Yes, they are. We respect your privacy and your need for confidentiality throughout the entire process.

    Is there an ideal length of rehab?

    Though the typical rehab programme lasts from 4 to 12 weeks, there is no ideal length applicable to everyone. You might progress more quickly than others in your facility; you might need a longer stay.

    What does treatment include?

    Treatment includes a medical assessment, medically supervised detox, a variety of rehab therapies, and aftercare. Residential facilities also provide food and lodging; some offer additional amenities.

    What are the factors I should look for in a rehab programme?

    In addition to the treatment approach taken (rehab vs detox-only), we recommend considering the level of accommodation, the physical location of a facility, and the kinds of therapies offered. There are enough options to meet any need.

    How much does treatment cost?

    Due to the varying length of treatment programmes and the different kinds of accommodation available, is not possible to provide an accurate cost here. The cost of your treatment will depend on the options you choose. We can discuss cost when you contact us.

    Are there treatment programmes for teens?

    Yes, there are. Specialised programmes tailored to the unique needs of teenagers are available through UKAT.

    How do you know if you’re addicted to alcohol?

    Alcoholism is a condition that manifests itself in identifiable symptoms and signs. If you exhibit any of them, you may be addicted. You can find more information about signs and symptoms here on our site.

    How do clinicians recommend duration of stay?

    Recommendations for the length of stay are made based on a patient’s overall health and the severity of the addiction. Length of stay is established in the patient’s treatment plan, though it can be modified as needed.

    Does insurance cover alcohol treatment?

    Though we cannot offer any guarantees, most private insurance policies do offer at least some level of coverage for alcohol treatment. Check your policy documents to learn what your insurance covers.

    How does alcohol rehab work?

    Alcohol rehab combines detox and rehabilitative therapies to help patients come clean and stay clean. Detox addresses the physical while rehab therapies address the mental and spiritual aspects of addictive behaviour. The goal is to achieve and maintain long-term sobriety.

    How effective is alcohol rehab?

    Alcohol rehab has proven effective for countless people over the years. When approached with the right mindset and combined with professional, supportive care, rehab can form the foundation on which the recovering alcoholic can build a new, alcohol-free life.

    Where else can I find help?

    If you are struggling with a benzodiazepine addiction and need help to get your life back on track, you can call us here at UKAT. Alternatively, you can speak to your doctor about the treatments that are available to you via the NHS.

    How does benzodiazepine addiction start?

    Benzodiazepines are highly addictive, and addiction starts with an increased tolerance to the effects of the drug. Whatever way you are taking benzodiazepines, either medicinal or recreational, you may find that you need to take more of the drug in order to achieve the level of satisfaction that you desire.

    If you increase the amount of benzodiazepines that you are taking then you run the risk of developing a physical dependency on your medication (although this can also happen when benzodiazepines are taken over a long period of time). If your use of benzodiazepines progresses after physical dependence and you are taking them even when it causes negative consequences for you and your loved ones, you likely have an addiction.

    Who gets addicted to benzodiazepines?

    It is easy to assume that a specific type of person gets addicted to benzodiazepines, but this is not the way that addiction works. In fact, addiction is an illness that does not discriminate and anyone who uses these drugs can go on to develop an addiction. It does not matter what age you are, where you come from, or how much money you have, if you allow your use of benzodiazepines to get out of control, you could go on to develop an addiction.

    What should I do about benzodiazepine addiction?

    if you believe you have an addiction to benzodiazepines, it is important to get help as soon as possible. It might be easier to do nothing, but your addiction will not go away if you ignore it. In fact, failure to address the issue now could mean that it gets worse as your need for benzodiazepines increases.

    If you would like help for your addiction, you can speak to your own doctor or you can contact us here at UKAT for confidential advice about what the next steps should be.

    How to help someone who is addicted to benzodiazepine?

    If someone you love or care about is addicted to benzodiazepines, you will want to do all you can to help. However, you may find that this person is reluctant to admit the problems exists. Most of those struggling with addiction are not ready to accept they have a problem.

    If you want to help this individual, it would be a good idea to have a calm and frank discussion about your concerns. Do not be surprised if you are met with angry denials; this is common. But that does not mean that you have to give up. Try to broach the subject again and if the person refuses to accept help, you may need to arrange an intervention with other family members and/or friends.

    Is Ativan addictive?

    Yes. Like all benzodiazepines, Ativan is highly addictive.

    How is Ativan addiction treated?

    Ativan addiction is treated with a combination of detox and psychotherapeutic rehab.

    How bad is Ativan addiction?

    Ativan addiction can be quite severe. In many cases it is debilitating.

    How is Ativan addiction cured?

    The only true cure for Ativan addiction is abstinence. Detox and psychotherapy are utilised to achieve that abstinence.

    Where else can I find help?

    Help is available through your GP, private rehab clinics, and charities that specialise in drug addiction.

    How does Ativan addiction start?

    In the vast majority of cases, addiction starts with a legitimate prescription to treat anxiety, seizures, or some other disorder. In fewer cases, Ativan addiction starts with recreational use.

    Who gets addicted to Ativan?

    Ativan addiction does not discriminate. It can affect professionals, blue-collar workers, people suffering from mental illness, and just about anyone else who uses the drug.

    What should I do about Ativan addiction?

    If you are addicted to Ativan, you need professional help to break that addiction. Do not ifnore it in the hope that it will go away by itself.

    How do I help someone who is addicted to Ativan?

    The best thing you can do for an addicted loved one is to offer your support and continue to encourage that person to seek professional treatment. You cannot force an addict to get better.

    Is Ativan addictive in low does?

    Absolutely. Lower does may delay dependence, but dependence can still occur if the drug is taken over an extended period.

    How can I spot Ativan dependence?

    There are multiple resources online detailing the symptoms of Ativan addiction. If you notice a friend of family member exhibiting the symptoms, he or she is likely dependent.

    Is Halcion addictive?

    Halcion is one of the most addictive types of benzodiazepine drugs, with a high potential for abuse. A physical dependence can occur within weeks, so it is recommended that this medication is not taken for longer than ten days.

    How is Halcion addiction treated?

    Halcion addiction is typically treated with a three-pronged approach that includes detoxification, rehabilitation, and aftercare. All three elements of the recovery process are necessary to ensure the best chance of long-term success. Detox is required to treat the physical addiction while rehabilitation deals with the emotional and psychological element of the illness. Aftercare is needed to help with ongoing sobriety maintenance.

    How bad is Halcion addiction?

    If left untreated, Halcion addiction can have devastating consequences in terms of your quality of life. You are likely to suffer poor health, relationship problems, and financial troubles. Furthermore, as your need for your medication grows, you are likely to take more unnecessary risks to achieve the level of satisfaction you desire. This may mean that you will take higher doses of Halcion, or mix it with other substances, thus risking an overdose and putting your life at risk.

    How to cure Halcion addiction?

    A Halcion addiction cannot be cured as there is no cure for addiction. However, it can be treated and managed long-term so that you do not suffer a return to addictive behaviour in the future. To ensure you have the best chance of long-term sobriety, it will be necessary for you to commit fully to a programme of detox, rehabilitation, and aftercare.

    Where else can I find help?

    Help for Halcion addiction is available from many sources. You can speak to your doctor in the first instance for advice about treatment programmes that may be available through the NHS. Your doctor can refer you to your local drug treatment service, or you can self-refer if you prefer.

    Information is also available online via treatment information databases. Programmes are provided by the NHS, charities, local support groups, local counsellors, and private clinics. For information about inpatient treatment for Halcion addiction, you can call us here at UKAT today.

    How does Halcion addiction start?

    Halcion addiction begins with an increased tolerance to the drug in most cases. If you are taking Halcion, you may quickly find that the effects of the drug begin to diminish. As it becomes less and less effective, your natural response may be to increase the dosage, but this can then lead to a physical dependence which, for most, can be the precursor for addiction.

    Who gets addicted to Halcion?

    Many people believe that they will never get addicted to Halcion because addiction is something that happens to those who have no willpower or who are weak. The reality is that anyone who uses a mood-altering drug can develop an addiction.

    You should be aware that there is no set type of person who gets addicted to Halcion, or any other chemical substance for that matter. Addiction does not discriminate and regardless of age, colour, race, religion, wealth, or background, you can be affected if you allow your use to spiral out of control.

    What should I do about Halcion addiction?

    If you are unable to quit or cut back on your Halcion use without suffering from withdrawal symptoms, it is likely that you have a physical dependence. If you find that your use of the medication is beginning to interfere with your ability to live a normal life but you continue to use it anyway, then it is highly likely that an addiction has developed.

    In this case, it will be necessary for you to seek help. Addiction will not go away if you ignore it. It will more than likely get worse instead. To regain control of your life, you will need to get help. You can speak to your doctor about what the next steps are in terms of overcoming your addiction, or you can call us at UKAT for advice.

    How to help someone who is addicted to Halcion?

    If someone you love is struggling to control his or her use of Halcion, you might be feeling helpless. You probably already know that there is not much you can do to force this person to seek help. Many individuals who struggle with addiction are not ready to admit to having a problem, especially in the early days. This forces loved ones to watch on, knowing that there is nothing they can do.

    Nevertheless, if you love someone who appears to be addicted to a drug such as Halcion, it is important to broach the subject. You may be hoping that it will pass and resolve itself, but this is very unlikely. The addicted person will need professional help.

    Try to speak to him or her in a calm manner and assure them that you are ready and willing to support him or her through the process of detox and rehabilitation. If you would like advice about how to approach an addicted loved one, please talk to us here at UKAT.

    Is Halcion addictive in low doses?

    Halcion is a potent drug that is typically administered in low doses. Although high doses of the drug can increase the risk for addiction, even therapeutic doses can result in a physical dependence.

    How can I spot Halcion dependence?

    Halcion dependence occurs quite quickly. If you are physically dependent on Halcion, you are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit or cut back on your use. These symptoms could include headaches, sweating and shaking whenever the effects of your medication wear off.

    Is Klonopin addictive?

    Klonopin is one of the most addictive types of benzodiazepine drugs available and physical dependence can occur very quickly. It is a fast-acting medication that can stay in the system for up to three days. Because of its hypnotic and sedative effects, it is regularly abused by those who want to get high.

    However, because a tolerance can develop very quickly, the potential for abuse is extremely high. When abused, the risk for Klonopin addiction increases.

    How is Klonopin addiction treated?

    Klonopin addiction is treated with a programme of detox, followed by rehabilitation. To ensure a full recovery, both parts of the recovery process must be completed. Detox is designed to address the physical addiction while rehabilitation aims to deal with the psychological part of the illness.

    Treatment in a rehabilitation programme typically involves a combined approach that utilises traditional talking therapies with holistic approaches to treat the mind, body, and spirit.

    How bad is Klonopin addiction?

    Any addiction to mood-altering chemicals can have devastating consequences; Klonopin addiction is no different. Prolonged abuse of this medication can result in harm to your mental and physical health and wellbeing and could affect your relationships with those around you.

    In addition, your risk of overdose will be high if you continue to abuse Klonopin. The risk is higher still in those taking larger than recommended doses of their medication and in those who abuse the drug alongside other substances.

    HowHow to cure Klonopin addiction?

    If a full recovery from Klonopin addiction is something you are interested in, you will need to consider a comprehensive treatment programme. This will mean starting with a detox programme that will allow you to quit your medication safely. In a secure detox facility, you will be at virtually no risk and your comfort will be a priority.

    What you do need to remember however is that addiction is not a curable illness. With the right treatment programme that deals with all aspects of the illness, you can recover permanently. To ensure your addictive behaviour does not return though, you will need to work hard on maintaining your sobriety once the treatment programme comes to an end.

    You can access aftercare support within your local community. You may have heard of groups such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA). These groups give members the opportunity to meet regularly with the aim of giving vital support for ongoing sobriety maintenance. It is likely that your treatment provider will encourage you to join your local support group when your programme ends.

    Where else can I find help?

    There is plenty of help available for those with addiction here in the UK. Your first port of call may be your doctor who can refer you to your local drug treatment service and provide the information you require about what programmes are available. You can also self-refer if you prefer.

    You will also find plenty of information throughout online addiction databases, or if you would like to speak to someone over the phone about the various programmes that are available in your area, please call UKAT today.

    How does Klonopin addiction start?

    Klonopin addiction begins with an increased tolerance to the effects of the drug, and this can happen very quickly. Your body will adapt when you start taking Klonopin, and as it gets used to it, the effects of the drug will diminish. This means that you will need to take more of it to achieve the same sense of satisfaction or relief.

    By increasing your dosage of Klonopin, you will be taking more than the recommended amount. This usually results in a physical dependence. You may get to the point where you find it difficult to be normal without your medication and you will start taking it more frequently. At this stage, you will find it impossible to quit the drug without suffering withdrawal symptoms. The only way to relieve these symptoms is with more Klonopin, and thus, a cycle of abuse and addiction begins.

    Who gets addicted to Klonopin?

    It is often assumed that those addicted to drugs are bad people with no willpower. The reality is that drug addiction can happen to anyone, and as is often the case with benzodiazepine addictions, those who do find themselves addiction have usually never touched an illegal drug in their lives. They might be the last people you would expect to be classed as an addict.

    Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem and unfortunately, most people who do get addicted do not even realise what is happening until it is too late.

    What should I do about Klonopin addiction?

    If you believe you are addicted to Klonopin, it is important to get help as soon as possible. No matter how much you might want to, the last thing you should do is ignore your situation. Your addiction will not go away if you do nothing; in fact, it is far more likely that your situation will get worse.

    Your need for Klonopin will get stronger, and as the drug loses its effectiveness due to your body adapting to it, you may begin looking for alternative ways of getting the relief you crave. This may cause you to abuse other substances at the same time, putting your health and life at risk. If you find yourself in this situation, you will need to get help as soon as possible before your situation spirals further out of control.

    How to help someone who is addicted to Klonopin?

    If someone you care about has been prescribed Klonopin and you have noticed worrying changes in his or her behaviour, it may be that he or she is abusing the drug. It is common for regular use of Klonopin to develop into abuse, often without the individual realising what has happened.

    It is crucial to address the issue as soon as possible as failure to do so may mean the situation deteriorating further. Try speaking to the affected person in a calm manner about your concerns, while being supportive and non-judgemental.

    You might be met with angry denials, particularly if the individual has not yet realised the full extent of his or her problem. Nevertheless, by showing your love and support and by planting the seed, you may find that your loved one comes around to the idea of getting help.

    Is Klonopin addictive in low doses?

    Because Klonopin is such a powerful benzodiazepine, even low doses can become addictive if taken for an extended period.

    How can I spot Klonopin dependence?

    The most obvious sign of Klonopin dependence is the presence of withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit or cut back on your use. You might notice symptoms such as headaches, sweating, nausea, stomach pain, and dizziness whenever the effects wear off.

    If you are also psychologically dependent on Klonopin, you might feel as though you are unable to cope without your medication and you may become anxious or tense whenever you need it.

    Is Librium addictive?

    Librium is a habit-forming drug with a high potential for abuse. Taking it for recreational purposes or taking it in higher than the recommended dose can lead to an increased tolerance. This means that you will need to take more of it to achieve the desired effects. Doing this can then lead to physical dependence followed by addiction.

    How is Librium addiction treated?

    Librium addiction is typically treated through a combination of detox and rehabilitation. Detox is designed to help you break free from Librium and once you have a clear mind and body, you can follow up with a programme of rehabilitation that will deal with the emotional issues of the illness in more depth. Once you have completed both detox and rehabilitation, you will need to continue with aftercare, which will help with continued maintenance of your sobriety.

    How bad is Librium addiction?

    Like all other substance addictions, Librium addiction can have devastating consequences for you and your family members. Unless you learn how to overcome this illness, it can destroy your life.
    If you allow your addiction to spiral out of control, it will take over every aspect of your life and could have a negative impact on your health, your relationships, your finances, and your hopes for the future.

    How to cure Librium addiction?

    Addiction is not a curable illness, but it can be effectively managed and maintained so that you avoid a return to addictive behaviour in the future. To fully recover from addiction, you will need to commit to a programme of detox and rehabilitation and follow up with ongoing aftercare.

    Where else can I find help?

    While you can call us here at UKAT for information and advice on how to overcome Librium addiction, you can also seek help elsewhere. Your doctor can provide information on NHS-run programmes that are available within your community, while you can access online information databases to get further information about the various options available to you. This will include information about local support groups and charities that offer care and support for all types of addiction.

    How does Librium addiction start?

    Librium addiction begins with exposure to the medication. While it is generally considered safe when taken in therapeutic doses over a short period, taking higher doses or for longer than four weeks can lead to a physical dependence, which is usually the precursor for addiction.

    Who gets addicted to Librium?

    Librium addiction is not reserved for a particular type of person, despite what you might have heard. It is not an illness that affects only those from a particular background or those of a certain age. The reality is that anyone who uses Librium, whether for medicinal or non-medicinal purposes, can allow their use to spiral out of control. When this happens, the risk of addiction increases dramatically.

    What should I do about Librium addiction?

    If you believe that you have a Librium addiction, it is important that you seek help as soon as possible. Addiction will not go away if you ignore it, and the sooner you act, the sooner you can get better.
    Talk to your doctor for advice about how and where to access help for addiction; alternatively, call us here at UKAT for information on our programmes.

    How to help someone who is addicted to Librium?

    If someone you care about is addicted to Librium, it is advisable to tackle the issue head-on rather than hoping it will go away. If you do not raise the issue with this person, he or she is likely to continue with the addictive behaviour and the illness will spiral further out of control.
    If you have tried to get him or her to seek help for addiction but have been met with denial, speak to one of our advisors about setting up an intervention. A family intervention is often used as a last resort to get a person into treatment. This is a process whereby a group of individuals close to the addict meetup to explain how they have been affected by the illness. It is a chance to show love and support to the addict. The good news is that most interventions end in success.

    Is Librium addictive in low doses?

    The recommended dose of Librium will be advised by your doctor who will determine this based on the condition being treated, your age, and your general health. Taking more than the recommended dose can increase your risk of addiction.
    You might think that taking a lower dose will prevent you from developing an addiction but doing this may mean you are not getting the relief you need. If you are not getting the desired effect from your medication, you may be tempted to increase the dose beyond that recommended by a doctor, thus increasing your risk of addiction.

    How can I spot Librium dependence?

    If you have developed a dependence on Librium, you are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms when the effects of the drug wear off or if you try to quit. These symptoms might make you feel unwell. If they subside when you take more of the drug, you probably already have a physical dependence. If this is the case, you will be unable to function normally without your medication. It is easy, then, to get caught in a cycle of abuse.

    Is Mogadon addictive?

    Mogadon is a highly addictive drug that is prescribed for short-term use only. As the body quickly adapts to its presence, it becomes less effective over a longer period. This reduced efficacy often results in individuals increasing their dose, which can then quickly lead to a physical and psychological dependence, followed by addiction.

    How bad is Mogadon addiction?

    As with all types of addiction, Mogadon addiction can result in harm to you and your loved ones. If you have developed an addiction to your medication, your risk of an overdose will be quite high, especially if you begin increasing your dose of Mogadon or mixing it with other substances.
    You will also be at risk of developing health problems while your relationships with the people you love will suffer.

    How to cure Mogadon addiction?

    Mogadon addiction can be effectively treated with a programme of detox and rehabilitation. You can withdraw safely from Mogadon in a medical detox facility and when you follow this with a rehabilitation programme, your chances of a full recovery will be high. Nevertheless, you should know that there is currently no cure for addiction, so it will be important for you maintain your recovery going forward.
    Joining a local support group will provide a network of people that you can turn to for keeping your recovery on track.

    Where can I find help?

    Help for a Mogadon addiction is available from various sources. Your doctor will be able to provide you with information about any NHS-run programmes in your area while you can also find the information you need via online information databases. There are local support groups operating in all areas of the UK where you can get the support you need to overcome your addiction.
    You can also contact us here at UKAT for information about how to access one of our programmes. We have several clinics across the UK where inpatient treatment programmes for all types of addiction are provided.

    How does Mogadon addiction start?

    Addiction typically starts with the abuse of a particular substance. In the case of Mogadon, you may have taken it on the advice of your doctor. If you began to feel as though your medication was not working as you expected, you might have started to increase the dosage.
    A tolerance to Mogadon can develop whether you are taking it for a genuine medical condition or if you are taking it for a non-medical purpose. The more Mogadon you take though, the higher the likelihood that you will develop an addiction.

    Who gets addicted to Mogadon?

    It is easy to assume that you will not get addicted to Mogadon because you are ‘not that type of person’, but the truth is that anyone who uses Mogadon can become addicted, regardless of how old he or she is, where he/she comes from, how much he/she has, or what their background is.

    What should I do about Mogadon addiction?

    If you are concerned that you have an addiction to Mogadon, it is important that you seek help as soon as possible. Addiction is an illness that will not go away if you ignore it. It is far more likely to get worse if you do nothing.

    How to help someone who is addicted to Mogadon?

    If you are worried about someone you care about and believe that he or she may be addicted to Mogadon, it is important that you address the issue as soon as possible. This person might not be ready to accept the truth, so you should be prepared to be met with denials.
    Nevertheless, it is important that you make the individual aware of your concerns and tell him or her in a calm manner that you are ready to offer love and support and do all you can to help. Knowing that you are there when the time comes to accept the problem can be a huge help. If you do nothing, then the affected person may continue with his or her addictive behaviour.

    Is Mogadon addictive in low doses?

    Mogadon is designed to be taken at a dose specified by your doctor for a period of seven to ten days only. This is because a tolerance can quickly develop; when this happens, the effectiveness of the drug is reduced. While low dose Mogadon might not cause a problem, it may also not provide the desired relief, which can then result in a temptation to up the dosage.

    How can I spot Mogadon dependence?

    Spotting the signs of Mogadon dependence in yourself can be difficult. However, there will be subtle changes in your behaviour that you can look out for. For example, if you are using more Mogadon than advised to by your doctor, or if you become irritable when your prescription is coming to an end.
    Dependence on Mogadon can result in withdrawal symptoms when the effects of the medication begin to wear off. You might notice that you are feeling anxious and having trouble concentrating. You may also feel very tired but at the same time are struggling to sleep.
    If you are worried about a loved one, then you should look out for signs, such as secretive behaviour, isolation, and a loss of interest in loved ones and responsibilities.

    Is temazepam addictive?

    Temazepam is a habit-forming drug that should only be used to treat short-term insomnia over a period of 2-4 weeks. Taking it for longer than this can lead to a physical dependence, which could then progress to a full-blown addiction. There is a strong potential for abuse with temazepam, and because of the increased tolerance that tends to occur quite quickly, many people are tempted to increase their dosage without advice from their doctor. This is classed as abuse and raises the risk of addiction.

    How is temazepam addiction treated?

    If you are addicted to temazepam, you will need to complete a detox initially to break the cycle of abuse. You may be advised to reduce your dose of medication over a number of days or weeks to reduce the severity of withdrawal symptoms. Alternatively, you may have a rapid detox where you stop taking temazepam completely and are prescribed a medication known as flumazenil to counter the effects of withdrawal.

    Once you are free from the drug, you can begin a treatment programme that comprises of various therapies to help you address the underlying issues that led to the addiction in the first place.

    How bad is temazepam addiction?

    Temazepam addiction is a serious problem due to the risk of severe withdrawal symptoms and the increased risk of overdose. If you are addicted to this drug, you will need to get professional help to safely withdraw from it and to regain control of your life. Without treatment you are likely to face a host of health and relationship problems.

    Where else can I find help?

    You can speak to one of our advisors via our confidential helpline or you can make an appointment with your own doctor who will assess your situation and if necessary refer you to your local treatment service. There are also a number of charity organisations operating across the UK offering help and advice to those affected by all types of addiction.

    How does temazepam addiction start?

    Temazepam addiction can begin quite quickly and often in those who have been prescribed the drug to treat a genuine medical condition. Because the brain and body adjust to the presence of this medication very quickly, a physical and psychological dependence can occur in a matter of days or weeks. When this happens, you might find that you are unable to quit temazepam without experiencing various withdrawal symptoms.

    You might also realise that by taking your medication, these symptoms quickly subside. This can then mean you are caught in a cycle of abuse and withdrawal that is almost impossible to get out of. If you continue to abuse temazepam, your need for it will increase and you may find that it begins to affect daily life. Nevertheless, once addicted, you will feel compelled to use it, despite the harm it is causing.

    Who gets addicted to temazepam ?

    The issue of addiction is one that many people make incorrect assumptions about. Many believe that you have to be a certain type of person to become addicted. For example, they believe that it is only those with no willpower or morals who will allow themselves to become addicts.
    The truth is that addiction has nothing to do with choice and everything to do with a loss of control. It is an illness of the brain that can affect anyone. So, absolutely anyone who has been taking temazepam, for either medical or non-medical purposes, can develop an addiction.

    What should I do about temazepam addiction?

    If you believe that you or someone you love has developed an addiction to temazepam, it is important that you seek help as soon as possible. Failure to do anything because you are hoping the situation will resolve itself can result in things getting worse.
    If you need someone to speak to, call us here at UKAT for advice and information about the next steps. Our service is completely confidential, and you are under no obligation to do anything other than talk.

    How do I help someone who is addicted to temazepam ?

    If a person you love is struggling with an addiction to temazepam, you will naturally want to do everything in your power to help. However, you probably already know that you cannot force someone to get help if he or she is unwilling to accept it.
    What you can do is talk to your loved one about your concerns and offer your love and support. You might find that the person is reluctant to admit that the problem exists initially, but this is normal.
    If you would like more advice on how to deal with the issue of a loved one’s addiction, you can speak to one of our advisors by calling our helpline today.

    Is temazepam addictive in low doses?

    While the risk for addiction is higher in larger doses of temazepam, it remains an addictive drug even in low doses and should not be taken for longer than two to four weeks.

    How can I spot temazepam dependence?

    If you are worried about someone you know and believe that he or she may have developed a dependence on temazepam, there may be some physical and behavioural signs you can look out for. These include slow breathing, poor coordination, a lack of personal grooming and hygiene, and shakiness. He or she might also begin exhibiting drug-seeking behaviours such as talking constantly about the drug or visiting more than one doctor for repeat prescriptions.

    Is Valium addictive?

    When taken in therapeutic doses over a short period, Valium is considered a safe drug. Nonetheless, when abused or taken for a longer period, tolerance to its effects can develop and a potential for abuse exists. This can result in physical dependence and addiction.

    How is Valium addiction treated?

    A comprehensive recovery programme is necessary for the treatment of a Valium addiction. This will begin with detox, where the physical addiction is addressed. During detox, you will quit Valium but will likely experience a range of withdrawal symptoms. When you have fully detoxed, you can begin the rehabilitation process whereby the issues that caused the addiction are tackled. To maintain sobriety, you will need to follow up with a programme of aftercare.

    How bad is Valium addiction?

    Valium addiction is like any other addiction in that it can destroy lives. If you become preoccupied with Valium and feel as though you are unable to function without it, there is a risk of it having a negative impact on many areas of your life.
    Continued abuse of Valium can have harmful consequences for your health and could affect your relationships with family members, friends, and work colleagues. Without treatment, your life could spiral out of control.

    Where else can I find help?

    While you can contact us here at UKAT for information about our clinics and programmes, you can also access help and support via your doctor. Valium addiction is a treatable condition and programmes are available on the NHS. Your doctor will be able to refer you to your local drug treatment service or you can refer yourself if you would prefer not to visit your GP.
    You can also find information about programmes provided by local support groups and charities by using an online information database.

    How does Valium addiction start?

    Valium addiction usually begins with an increased tolerance to the effects of the drug. When your medication is no longer providing the relief that it once did, it may be tempting to increase the dosage to achieve the desired level of satisfaction.
    However, upping the dose is likely to result in physical and psychological dependence. When this happens, the risk for addiction increases. When you begin to crave Valium and take it even though it is causing harm in your life and in the lives of those around you, you are more than likely addicted.

    Who gets addicted to Valium?

    It would be nice to think that addiction is something that happens only to people who are bad or weak, but that is not the way it works. The truth is that anyone who uses Valium is at risk of developing an addiction. It does not matter how old you are, where you come from, what your gender you are, or the level of education you have; if you use Valium, you could allow your use of it to get out of control.

    What should I do about Valium addiction?

    If you believe you have an addiction to Valium, the last thing you should do is ignore the problem. Your illness will not go away if you ignore it, no matter how much you want it to. The best thing to do is speak to someone about your concerns. This could be a close family member, friend, or a doctor.
    You can also talk to us here at UKAT for advice and information about the options available to you. We can provide a listening ear and offer a full assessment, which will give you a clearer picture of what you are dealing with.

    How do I help someone who is addicted to Valium?

    If someone you love is using Valium and you believe that he or she has become addicted, it is important that you address the issue as soon as possible. While the person might be reluctant to admit to having a problem, by raising the questions you can plant a seed and you might find that he or she comes around to the idea of getting help.
    If you do nothing, the affected individual is likely to continue with his or her addictive behaviour, and the longer this is allowed to happen, the worse the problem will become. Basically, the earlier you intervene, the better the chances are that he or she will make a full recovery.

    Is Valium addictive in low doses?

    Taking a low dose of Valium may prevent an addiction from occurring but it could also become ineffective after a while, resulting in a need to increase the dose. If you increase your dose of medication, it may offer relief for a little time, but after a while it too will become less effective. If this cycle continues, you will find yourself with an addiction that is difficult to break.

    How can I spot Valium dependence?

    Valium dependence tends to result in withdrawal symptoms when the effects of the medication wear off. If you are struggling with unpleasant symptoms when you try to quit or cut down on your Valium use, then it is likely that you are already physically dependent. You might feel as though you need Valium to be able to function normally.

    Is Xanax addictive?

    Yes. Like all benzodiazepines, Xanax produces feelings of euphoria and relaxation that are highly addictive. It is possible to develop an addiction to this drug in just a few weeks’ time. As such, experts warn doctors against writing long-term prescriptions for Xanax.

    How is Xanax addiction treated?

    Xanax addiction is typically treated through a process of gradual withdrawal followed by psychotherapeutic treatments. Prescription medications are combined with a variety of counselling therapies to help addicts overcome their addictive behaviours.

    How bad is Xanax addiction?

    The answer to this question is relative. Xanax addiction is a serious problem from a medical and psychological standpoint, but how serious it in any one case depends on how long a person has been taking the drug, and in what doses. The safest thing is to just assume all Xanax abuse is bad enough to seek out medical help

    How is Xanax addiction cured?

    A person is considered ‘cured’ of Xanax addiction when he or she can maintain permanent abstinence. The fastest way to get there is through a comprehensive detox and rehabilitation programme. Xanax addiction requires medical intervention. It is as simple as that.

    Where else can I find help?

    You can get help for Xanax addiction through your GP, an outpatient drug treatment centre, or a residential treatment facility. You might also find a limited amount of assistance from local charitable organisations and drug addiction support groups. Feel free to contact UKAT if you need assistance locating accessible help in your area.

    How does Xanax addiction start?

    Every addiction starts with just one use. For some people, this means taking Xanax under a doctor’s prescription and supervision. For others, addiction starts when Xanax is used recreationally. They may buy it online, obtain it from friends or family members, or get it on the street.

    Who gets addicted to Xanax?

    Xanax does not discriminate in terms of who becomes addicted to it. Anyone who uses the drug for more than six weeks is at substantial risk for developing an addiction. You could become addicted regardless of your sex, ethnicity, education level, socio-economic status, religion, creed, etc.

    What should I do about Xanax addiction?

    If you are suffering from addiction, you should immediately call our helpline or go see your GP. The sooner you get treatment, the better off you are going to be. The worst thing you can do is ignore your addiction in the hopes that it will go away.
    If you are not sure or you are somewhat concerned, you can reach out to us for that too. We can help you figure out if you are addicted. And if so, we can get you some help.

    How do I help someone who is addicted to Xanax?

    First, note that you cannot force the person in the treatment. The best thing you can do is offer your support and, in the meantime, look for treatment options so that you’re ready should the person make a decision to seek treatment. If you would like to try to encourage a treatment decision, consider conducting an intervention.

    Is Xanax addictive in low doses?

    Absolutely. Even in low doses, Xanax interferes with how GABA and its associated receptor work. There is significant evidence to show that the body never fully recovers from this drug in some cases. Because there is no way to know how your body would respond to Xanax, the best course of action is to just not take the chance.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to Ativan?

    Ativan abuse results in very specific symptoms that are easily recognised by clinicians. You can look up the symptoms online. If you exhibit the systems and you simultaneously find that you cannot control your Ativan use, you are addicted. Addiction is essentially the inability to stop taking the drug no matter how much you want to.

    Can Ativan cause addiction?
    Absolutely. Like all benzodiazepines, Ativan is a highly addictive drug that anyone can get hooked on. Statistics show that upwards of 40% of people who use Ativan for more than six weeks will eventually develop addiction.
    How can I stop Ativan addiction?

    The only way to stop Ativan addiction is to stop using the drug. As you understand from this guide, the best way to stop using the drug is through professional treatment rooted in gradual withdrawal.

    How do I treat Ativan addiction?

    Ativan addiction is best treated by professionals in either an outpatient or inpatient setting. Through a combination of gradual detox and effective psychotherapeutic treatments, it is possible to beat the addiction.

    Can Ativan rehab be done at home?

    It is possible to undergo Ativan rehab at home. However, it is not advised. There are too many risks involved. Rather, it is better to seek out professional treatment by way of an outpatient clinic or a private, residential rehab facility. Private treatment is safer, more effective, and medically assisted.

    Can I get Ativan rehab on NHS?
    According to NHS Choices, it is possible to get Ativan rehab through the health service and one of its trusts. The NHS recommends seeing a GP to get things started. The GP may treat you at his or her practice or refer you to a local outpatient clinic.
    What can I expect after Ativan rehab?

    Following the completion of rehab, you can expect to experience stressful situations that encourage you to go back to using the drug. You can also expect a range of aftercare services designed to help you deal with these situations. By taking advantage of ongoing counselling, group support and other therapies, you can meet stressful situations head-on and beat them.

    What happens after rehab?

    It is common to wonder what happens after rehab, and this is actually something that concerns many people before they start their treatment programme. Indeed, many mistakenly believe that they will be left to fend for themselves when their programme comes to an end.
    Most rehab providers include free aftercare support for patients who have completed their programme with them. This support might include regular counselling sessions or phone contact with your therapist, as necessary.
    There are also additional resources within your local community. Support groups can be a great way to integrate yourself back into society and will ensure that you have a network of people who know exactly what you are dealing with and who will be there to support you when it comes to maintaining your sobriety.

    Does insurance cover benzodiazepine addiction treatment?
    Most major insurance providers will cover treatment for addiction. If you are paying for private health insurance or are getting it as a benefit through your employment, you may be covered for all or part of a treatment programme at a residential rehab clinic.
    Nevertheless, it is important to check your policy as some insurance providers do not cover private rehab. It will depend on the provider in question and the level of cover that your policy includes.
    You will also have to check with the rehab clinic to ensure that they accept payments through an insurance company. If not, it may be necessary for you to fund the cost of the rehab treatment and then claim it back from your insurance company. Alternatively, you can look for another treatment provider.
    How to approach an addict

    It is difficult to broach the subject of addiction with another person as there is always the fear that you might be mistaken. Most people are worried about offending someone they love and will skirt around the issue of addiction. It is often only when they have definitive proof that the illness exists that they will have no choice but to approach him or her.
    If you are in this situation and are wondering how to approach an addict, know that it is best to choose a time when he or she is not under the influence of a mood-altering substance. A good time to tackle the subject of addiction and treatment is when the addict is suffering the after-effects of his or her substance abuse. You might find that he or she is more open to the suggestion of treatment at this time.
    It is important to stay calm and do not get into an argument with the affected person. Explain your concerns and ensure him or her that you only want to help and offer support.

    Are benzodiazepines addictive?

    Benzodiazepines are highly addictive and as such are recommended for short term use only. Taking them for longer than 2-4 weeks could end up in an increased tolerance to the effects, which might progress to an addiction quite quickly

    What are the signs of addiction?

    Addiction is a pattern of behaviour that has a negative impact on your life. It can be difficult to tell when abuse has progressed to addiction though because of the way in which mood-altering substances affect the brain’s ability to think clearly.
    One of the main signs of addiction is an inability to control your use of a particular substance. So, if you continue taking benzodiazepines despite knowing that doing so will cause negative consequences, it is likely that you have an addiction.
    You might also experience withdrawal symptoms when the effects of your medication wear off or when you try to quit. If so, it is likely that you are physically dependent on benzos.

    Am I addicted to benzodiazepines?

    To tell if you are addicted to benzos, it is important to consider how you use them. Are you taking more medication than advised to by your doctor? Or are you taking benzos for recreational purposes? If so, you may already have an addiction. If you have tried to quit but found yourself unable to do so, or if you are taking your medication in a way that was not prescribed, it is likely that you have a problem that requires help.
    Addiction to benzos is characterised by the negative impact it is having on your life. If your relationships are suffering as a result of your use of this substance and you are losing interest in activities you once enjoyed, you may have an addiction.

    What types of treatment are available?

    Treatment for benzodiazepine addiction typically consists of detox and rehabilitation. Both inpatient and outpatient programmes are designed to help with recovery from benzodiazepine addiction and both utilise various treatments such as cognitive behavioural therapy, dialectical behaviour therapy, and holistic treatments.

    What are the options for benzodiazepine detox?

    Withdrawing from benzos can be tough; the process can be done over the course of many months or through a rapid detoxification process. During a detox programme in a dedicated facility, you may be given the option to cease your medication completely and have a medication administered to combat the occurrence of any withdrawal symptoms.
    Alternatively, you might be prescribed a substitute drug in tapering doses to help with the withdrawal from the drug you are detoxing from.

    Why do people start taking benzodiazepines?

    There are many reasons individuals take benzodiazepines. While the majority are prescribed these drugs to treat legitimate medical conditions, there are many who intentionally choose to abuse benzos for recreational purposes or to help them forget about painful memories.
    Some people deal with traumatic memories of past experiences and believe that substances such as benzodiazepines will offer some relief. And while they often do in the beginning, what tends to happen is that an addiction will develop. This means that the person is left dealing with more than one problem.
    Benzodiazepines are also prescribed by doctors to treat a variety of conditions such as anxiety disorder. Unfortunately, many individuals underestimate the addictive nature of their medication and fail to recognise the dangers of continuing to use benzos for longer than four weeks.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to Halcion?

    It can be tough to tell if your use of Halcion has progressed from abuse to addiction, but if you find that your life is being negatively affected by your medication and yet you continue to use it anyway, you are probably already addicted.
    Addiction is defined as a pattern of behaviour that has a negative impact on quality of life. If you have tried to quit or cut down on your use of Halcion without success, it is important that you seek help as soon as possible.

    Can Halcion cause addiction?

    Halcion is one of the most addictive benzodiazepine drugs and addiction to it can occur very quickly. It is therefore recommended that this medication be used for no longer than 10 days. Addiction occurs in not only those who abuse the drug but also those who take it at therapeutic doses for a prolonged period.

    How to stop Halcion addiction?

    To prevent Halcion addiction from occurring, it is important that you do not use it for longer than advised and that you do not take it in high doses or mix it with other substances.

    How to treat Halcion addiction?

    Halcion addiction is most effectively treated with a comprehensive programme of detox, rehabilitation, and aftercare. Treatment programmes tend to include a combination of medication, behavioural therapies, and holistic therapies to improve overall mental and physical wellbeing.

    Can Halcion rehab be done at home?

    Rehabilitation takes place in a supportive environment on an inpatient or outpatient basis. If you are keen to recover at home though, an outpatient programme is the best choice. With this type of care, you will attend regular counselling sessions at the clinic before returning home afterwards.

    Can I get Halcion rehab in the NHS?

    The NHS provides outpatient programmes for all types of addiction, including Halcion addiction. To access an NHS-run programme, talk to your doctor or self-refer to your local drug treatment service. You can find information on how and where to access these services by using an online information database.

    What to expect after Halcion rehab?

    After Halcion rehab, you will need to work hard on maintaining your sobriety while you adjust to living a normal everyday life. You should be aware that sobriety maintenance is an ongoing issue and one that you will need to do for the rest of your life. However, as your recovery gets stronger, sobriety will become as natural to you as taking your medication once was.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to Klonopin?

    If you are addicted to Klonopin, you may experience withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit or cut back on your usage. Your use of this medication may start to have a negative impact on your health and your relationships with others. If you continue to use Klonopin despite knowing the harm it causes, you are likely to have an addiction.

    Can Klonopin cause addiction?

    Klonopin is one of the most addictive benzodiazepine drugs out there and has a very high potential for abuse, mainly due to its sedative effects. Addiction can develop within weeks of taking this drug.

    How to stop Klonopin addiction?

    To prevent Klonopin addiction, it is important that you take it only as directed and only for a short period of time. If you notice that your medication is no longer providing the relief you desire, it is important that you speak to your doctor. Do not increase your dose.

    How to treat Klonopin addiction?

    Klonopin addiction is typically treated with detox and rehabilitation programme. To access such a programme, talk to your doctor or your local support group. You can also get in touch with us here at UKAT for advice.

    Can Klonopin rehab be done at home?

    Klonopin rehab involves individual and group therapy sessions, which typically take place in rehabilitation clinics. If you are keen to have your rehab at home, a daycare treatment programme is the best option. This means that you will not have to stay in the clinic; instead you can attend therapy sessions and then return home when they are finished.

    Can I get Klonopin rehab on the NHS?

    Rehabilitation for addiction is provided free of charge by the NHS. To access an NHS-run programme, you can speak to your doctor who will refer you to your local treatment service, or you can refer yourself if you prefer. To find out more about these treatment services, you can check online information databases.

    What to expect after Klonopin rehab?

    It is natural to wonder what your life will be like after Klonopin rehab. While there is no way to know exactly what it will be like, you can expect to see improvements in your health, relationships, and finances.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to Librium?

    Being able to recognise an addiction to Librium is essential if you are to overcome this illness. But this can be a struggle and many addicts practice denial as it is easier to pretend that the problem does not exist.
    To tell if you have an addiction to Librium, you need to figure out what kind of impact your use of it is having on your ability to live a normal life. If it is causing harm to you and is affecting your relationships with others but you are unable to stop using it, it is likely you have an addiction.

    Can Librium cause addiction?

    Taking Librium as directed for a period of no more than four weeks is recommended. However, if you take Librium for longer than this, even at therapeutic doses, you are at risk of developing an addiction. It is possible to become physically dependent on Librium within a noticeably short period of time, which means you are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms when you try to stop taking it. This can then lead to a cycle of abuse and withdrawal, which more often than not leads to addiction.

    How to stop Librium addiction?

    To prevent a Librium addiction from developing, it is recommended that it be taken for no longer than four weeks. Prolonged use of this medication can increase the risk for addiction, as can taking it in higher doses than advised to by a doctor.

    How to treat Librium addiction?

    When Librium addiction develops, it will be necessary to complete a comprehensive recovery programme that includes a detox to help you withdraw safely from your medication. This should be followed by a programme of rehabilitation that will deal with the more complex emotional and psychological element of the illness.

    Can Librium rehab be done at home?

    Rehab for addiction takes place in a clinic. If you want to recover at home, you will need to choose an outpatient programme that will allow you to attend regular counselling sessions at a local clinic. You will not have to stay overnight.

    Can I get Librium rehab on the NHS?

    Treatment for Librium addiction can be accessed through your local drug treatment service, which is provided by the NHS. To access this type of programme, you should contact your doctor. Alternatively, use an online information database for details of your local treatment service and refer yourself.

    What to expect after Librium rehab?

    Librium rehab will give you the opportunity to rebuild your life when your programme ends. During the treatment programme, you will learn vital skills that will enable you to become a productive member of your community.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to Mogadon?

    Mogadon addiction can happen quite quickly, and many people do not realise that their use has become a problem initially. One of the earliest signs that your use of Mogadon has become an issue is if you are taking more of it to achieve the level of satisfaction you desire.
    If your use of this medication has started to have a negative impact on your life but you feel compelled to use it anyway, you probably have an addiction.

    Can Mogadon cause addiction?

    Mogadon is a highly addictive medication that can become habit-forming quite quickly. When taken in large doses or when mixed with other substances such as alcohol or other drugs, the risk for addiction is higher.

    How to stop Mogadon addiction

    The best way to prevent Mogadon addiction from occurring is to take it for no longer than seven to ten days. Avoid increasing the dose of medication even if you feel that it is not working as effectively as it did when you first began taking it. Instead, talk to your doctor about other non-medical ways of improving your sleep patterns.

    How to treat Mogadon addiction?

    If you are worried that you have an addiction to Mogadon, it is important that you get help as soon as possible. The first step will be to detox from your medication so that you have a clear mind and body before tackling a programme of rehabilitation.
    Talk to your doctor about the next steps involved in getting treatment; alternatively, you can contact us here at UKAT to find out more about our clinics and the programmes we offer to treat addictions such as those to Mogadon.

    Can Mogadon rehab be done at home?

    Rehab generally takes place within either an inpatient or outpatient clinic. While you would not have your rehab sessions at home if you choose an outpatient clinic, you would attend regular counselling at the clinic and return home afterwards. This allows you to continue with everyday life while overcoming the addiction at the same time.

    Can I get Mogadon rehab on the NHS?

    The NHS offers outpatient programmes for all types of addiction. Speak to your doctor about getting a referral, or you can refer yourself to your local drug treatment service. You should be aware, however, that NHS-run programmes are heavily subscribed and there tends to be long waiting times before places become available.

    What to expect after Mogadon rehab?

    If you complete a programme of rehabilitation for a Mogadon addiction, you can expect your life to get back on the right track once more. You will no longer be ruled by your need for medication and you will have the opportunity to start enjoying all that life has to offer again.
    You can spend time with your loved ones and re-evaluate what you want from life. Maybe you will return to your job and look for a promotion. Or perhaps you will return to education or begin an entirely new career. The point is that you can do anything you want when you are no longer living under a cloud of addiction.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to temazepam?

    There is a difference between abuse and addiction, so it can be difficult to tell when you have crossed a line. However, if you find that you are compelled to use temazepam even when you do not want to, or if your use of it is beginning to take over your life and cause negative problems, you are more than likely addicted.
    To tell for sure, why not give us a call and speak to one of our advisors, who can provide a full assessment of your situation.

    Can temazepam cause addiction?

    Temazepam is a highly addictive drug that should only be used for a short time to treat insomnia. Using it for longer than this can cause a physical dependence that can quickly progress to addiction.

    How to stop temazepam addiction?

    If you are taking temazepam and are worried that you might develop an addiction, it is a good idea to speak to your doctor. You should not use this medication for longer than a maximum of four weeks. However, using it for less than this will decrease your risk for addiction.

    How to treat temazepam Addiction?

    If you have an addiction to temazepam, it will be necessary for you to quit the drug and then complete a rehab programme to address the issues that caused the illness. Talk to your doctor about how to access a programme to help you overcome your addiction or call us here and we will advise on the options available.

    Can temazepam rehab be done at home?

    Rehabilitation is the process that takes place after a detoxification. It is never advisable to quit temazepam suddenly, and if you are planning on quitting at home, you will need to discuss this with your doctor first.
    For a rehabilitation programme, you will need to attend an inpatient or outpatient programme where you will be treated with various therapies designed to tackle the underlying issues that led to your addiction.

    Can I get Temazepam rehab on the NHS?
    Treatment for addiction is provided on a day care basis by the NHS rehab services, although accessing these programmes can be difficult due to the heavy demands on the service. If you would like to have temazepam treatment on the NHS, talk to your doctor, who will refer you to your local treatment service.
    But be aware, it is likely that you will have to wait before your initial consultation and before a place becomes available.
    What to expect after temazepam rehab?

    When you finish a programme of rehab for a temazepam addiction, you can expect your life to change. You will no longer be in the grip of addiction and you will now be free to make good choices and decisions. Your future looks bright when you break free from addiction.
    You can work on repairing the damage that may have been caused to your relationships and you can build new friendships with people in your local support group. You can also repair your financial situation, which may have taken a hit as your ability to work was affected by your dependence on temazepam.

    A world of opportunity awaits you, and if you are prepared to work hard on maintaining your sobriety and enjoying all that the world has to offer, you can go on to live a healthier and happier sober life.

    What does Xanax treatment include?

    Xanax treatment starts with a medical assessment. From that medical assessment comes a customised treatment plan that includes both detox and rehabilitative therapies. Rehab therapies are generally talking therapies offered in a one-on-one or group setting. Aftercare follows treatment for as long as 12 months; longer if you need it.

    What are the street names for Xanax?

    Xanax is commonly known on the street as:

    • Xannies
    • Handlebars, bars, or Z-bars
    • Blue footballs
    • Upjohn
    • Benzos
    • Schoolbus
    • Bicycle parts
    • Yellow boys
    • White girls, white boys
    • Footballs
    • Planks.
    How long does Xanax rehab take?

    There is no way to put a specific time limit on any one person’s rehab. The average user needs between 10 and 15 days to complete detox and then up to 12 weeks to complete rehab. There are rehab programmes as short as four weeks for individuals who make good progress.

    Are Xanax rehabs private and confidential?

    Absolutely. Your privacy is of paramount concern to all private clinics. They do not divulge patient information outside of the rehab setting.

    Is there any ideal length for Xanax rehab?

    No, there isn’t. We like to say there is no one-size-fits-all rehab programme for every recovering addict. As such, there is no single time limit either. Your doctors, nurses, and therapists will work together to decide what would be an appropriate length for your case. Whatever that length happens to be is best for you.

    How do I know if I’m addicted to Valium?

    An addiction to Valium can be difficult to spot because you may not realise you are addicted until actually trying to quit. However, if your use of Valium is having a negative impact on your life, and you are unable to quit or even cut back without suffering withdrawal symptoms, it is likely that you are addicted.

    Can Valium cause addiction?

    Valium is a safe drug when used in therapeutic doses over a short period. You should be aware though that it can cause addiction when abused or when used continuously for a period of more than four months.

    How to stop Valium addiction?

    The best way to stop a Valium addiction from occurring is to use it only as directed. If you notice that the medication is becoming less effective, speak to your doctor about safely withdrawing from it.

    How to treat Valium addiction?

    Valium addiction can be effectively treated with a comprehensive programme of recovery that includes a detox, rehabilitation, and aftercare. By including all three elements in the programme, you will have the best chance at long-term success.

    Can Valium rehab be done at home?

    If you want to recover from Valium addiction at home, you will need to choose an outpatient programme that will allow you to recover on a daycare basis. Nevertheless, you should know that your counselling and therapy sessions will still take place in the clinic – you will just return home after each session.

    Can I get Valium rehab on the NHS?

    The NHS offers outpatient programmes for all types of addictions, including Valium addiction. To access such a programme, talk to your doctor or refer yourself to your local drug treatment service. You will find details of these services via online information databases.

    What to expect after Valium rehab?

    Once Valium rehab is over, you can expect improvements in many areas of your life. When you are no longer living under the weight of addiction, you will be able to rebuild relationships and your financial situation should start to recover. Your health should improve, and you will have a renewed sense of freedom to make good decisions and choices. Valium rehab will give you the chance to get your life back on track.

    When to seek medical care?

    A benzodiazepine addiction is a serious problem that usually requires medical attention. If you are worried that you may have developed an addiction, it is important to seek help as soon as possible. As with all addictions, this illness will not go away by itself if you do nothing.

    If you are worried about someone else and are concerned that he or she may have taken too much medication, it is vital that you seek medical care immediately as your loved one may require urgent treatment for a benzodiazepine overdose.

    Getting help for benzodiazepine addiction

    If you believe you might have developed an addiction to benzodiazepines, you can speak to your doctor who should be able to refer you to your local treatment service. You can also contact us here at UKAT about how we can help you to overcome addiction. We have a number of treatment facilities across the UK where you can access detox and rehabilitation programmes that will help you get your life back on track.

    How do I know if someone is on benzos?

    It can be hard to tell when someone is on benzos if they do not tell you. Nonetheless, there are certain signs of drug abuse that you can look out for, including changes to behaviour. If someone you care about has become secretive and withdrawn and you suspect that it could be due to substance abuse, you should look out for the symptoms of benzodiazepine abuse as described above.

    When to go for rehab for benzodiazepine addiction?

    If you believe you have an addiction to benzodiazepines, it is important to act as soon as possible. Quitting the drug is obviously important, but this should not be done abruptly due to the risk of severe withdrawal symptoms.

    If you have a strong compulsion to use benzodiazepines despite knowing that it will cause negative consequences, you are likely to have an addiction that will require both detox and rehabilitation. Call us today for information on how we can help you.

    How much Ativan causes addiction?

    As with any drug, it is not so much the amount of Ativan used that leads to addiction. It is the length of time the drug is taken in relation to how readily a person’s body develops tolerance. Even small amounts of the drug can lead to addiction if taken for a long enough period.

    How do I recognise Ativan abuse?

    Learning and remembering the warning signs listed in this guide will equip you to recognise Ativan abuse in a friend or family member. Note that some of the warning signs are common to all sorts of addictive substances.

    When should I seek medical care?

    Medical care is appropriate whenever you or someone you know continues to use Ativan for longer than 4 to 6 weeks. You should also seek medical care if you or someone else begins exhibiting any of the warning signs listed in this guide.

    How do I get help for Ativan addiction?

    Help is available through the NHS by way of your GP. However, a better means of getting help is to contact us so that we can help you locate and enrol in a residential treatment programme. You can contact treatment centres on your own if you wish.

    When do Ativan withdrawal symptoms start?

    People react to Ativan withdrawal differently. As a general rule, initial onset symptoms begin within 6 to 12 hours of a user’s last dose.

    How long does Ativan withdrawal last?

    The average Ativan user completes withdrawal within 5 to 10 days. In cases of protracted withdrawal, the process could last from 10 to 15 days. Regardless of how long it takes, note that some patients report lingering symptoms for weeks afterwards.

    How much Halcion causes addiction?

    Halcion is an immensely powerful drug and even low doses can cause addiction if taken for a prolonged period. It is recommended that this drug is taken for no longer than ten days to minimise the risk of addiction.

    How do I recognise Halcion abuse?

    It can be tough to spot the signs of abuse in yourself, but if you have started to take higher doses of your medication to get the relief you desire, or if you are mixing it with other substances to enhance its effects, it may be time to take a step back and evaluate your use. If you continue like this, you could easily end up with a physical dependence, which could lead to addiction.

    When to seek medical care?

    It is vital that you seek medical care if you believe you may have taken too much Halcion. Just four times the maximum recommended dose can trigger an overdose, which could be fatal if severe and if left untreated.
    Medical care is also necessary where an addiction has developed. If you are unable to quit or even cut down on Halcion, despite wanting to, it is important to seek medical advice about how to withdraw safely from this drug.

    How do I get help for Halcion addiction?

    If you believe that you have developed an addiction to Halcion, speak to your doctor about how and where to access help. NHS-run drug treatment services are available throughout the UK; you can be referred by your doctor or self-refer if you wish. You can also access help from local support groups, charities, and private clinics.

    When do Halcion withdrawal symptoms start?

    As Halcion is a short-acting benzodiazepine drug, symptoms tend to start quite quickly. You might even start noticing the first symptoms appearing within 6-24 hours after your last dose, although 1-3 days is more common.

    How long does Halcion withdrawal last?

    Withdrawal from Halcion typically lasts for around two weeks. However, the length of withdrawal can be longer if you are also suffering from mental health problems or if you have been abusing Halcion with other substances.

    How much Klonopin causes addiction?

    While higher doses of Klonopin are said to increase the risk for addiction, even therapeutic doses can cause an addiction when the medication is taken over a prolonged period.

    How do I recognise Klonopin abuse?

    Spotting the signs of abuse in yourself can be tough, but if you are taking higher doses of the drug than advised to by your doctor, or if you need to mix Klonopin with other substances to feel its effects, you are already abusing this medication.
    Another sign of abuse is taking Klonopin that was prescribed for another person.

    When to seek medical care?

    If you believe that your use of Klonopin may have spiralled out of control, it is important to get help as soon as possible. Seeking medical care at this stage can prevent you from developing a crippling addiction that could have a negative impact on every part of your life.
    You should also seek medical care immediately if you have taken too much medication and are experiencing severe sedation or any other sign of an overdose.

    How do I get help for Klonopin addiction?

    If you need help for Klonopin addiction, you can find information on the various treatment providers in your area by checking an online information database. You can also speak to your doctor, who may be able to refer you to your local NHS drug treatment service. There is also charity run programmes available across the UK as well as local support groups such as Narcotics Anonymous.
    If you are interested in an inpatient programme, contact us here at UKAT for information about the options we provide.

    When do Klonopin withdrawal symptoms start?

    Because Klonopin is a longer-acting benzodiazepine, it can take a few days before the drug begins to leave your system. This means that it could be between one and four days before the earliest signs of withdrawal are noticed.

    How long does Klonopin withdrawal last?

    Klonopin withdrawal varies from person to person. How long it lasts depends on how quickly the drug is withdrawn. Some individuals manage to get clean in just over a week if they do a rapid detoxification, but most people will be advised to gradually reduce their medication over a period of weeks or months.

    How much Librium causes addiction?

    The amount of Librium you take will be determined by your doctor. The dosage will differ depending on the condition being treated. However, it is not so much the actual dosage of Librium that causes addiction but how you use it.
    If you increase your recommended dose of Librium without consulting a doctor because you have developed a tolerance to it, you are likely to find that with time that this dosage will also become less effective. Increasing the dosage again could not only raise your risk of an overdose but also mean you get caught in a cycle of abuse and withdrawal. This is likely to lead to addiction.

    How do I recognise Librium abuse?

    If you begin taking more Librium than the amount stated on your prescription, you are guilty of abuse. However, abuse also occurs when you take Librium that was prescribed for another person or when you use it with another mood-altering substance. It is important to understand what abuse is so that you can recognise it if it occurs.

    When to seek medical care?

    If you have tried to quit or cut down on your use of Librium but found you were unable to because of unpleasant withdrawal symptoms, it is likely that you have developed a physical dependence. If you are unable to function without Librium, an addiction has probably developed. If this is the case, it is wise to seek medical care as soon as possible so that you can begin a programme of treatment to help you get better.
    You should also seek medical care at once if you have taken too much Librium and are experiencing any of the symptoms of an overdose (see above).

    How do I get help for Librium addiction?

    Librium addiction is treated by various organisations including the NHS, local support groups, charities, and private clinics. Information on the various programmes available in your area can be accessed via online information databases.
    If you want to access an NHS programme, talk to your doctor or self-refer to a local drug treatment service. For more information about private clinics and the type of programmes they provide, please contact us here at UKAT.

    When do Librium withdrawal symptoms start?

    Librium is a slow-acting benzodiazepine drug which means it lingers in the system for between ten and thirty hours. This means that the first symptoms of withdrawal may be delayed and might not appear until around the third or fourth day after quitting Librium.

    How long does Librium withdrawal last?

    It is not possible to say how long Librium withdrawal lasts exactly as there are many factors that can influence this. If you were a heavy user of Librium prior to withdrawal, or if you were also using other substances, your withdrawal might last longer.
    You may also suffer from protracted withdrawal, which can cause symptoms to linger for months, or to come and go without warning for up to a year after you have stopped using Librium.

    Can Xanax effect your eyesight?

    Absolutely. One of the known side effects of this drug is blurred vision.

    How does Xanax affect the brain?

    Xanax interferes with the normal operation of certain brain chemicals and the receptors. This is what produces the drugs sedating effects. The altered brain function is also what often produces memory problems, loss of concentration, and cognitive impairment.

    How does Xanax affect the body?

    Xanax alters certain brain chemicals in both volume and their effectiveness. This results in a calming effect on the body, especially the muscles. It makes a person feel week, lethargic, and extremely relaxed.

    When do Xanax withdrawal symptoms start?

    Withdrawal symptoms tend to start appearing within 6 to 12 hours of the patient’s last full dose.

    How long do Xanax withdrawal symptoms last?

    The average patient begins to see a gradual subsiding of withdrawal symptoms somewhere between the 5th and 10th days. All but the most severe symptoms are completely gone within 15 to 21 days.

    How long do the effects of Xanax last?

    Due to its relatively short half-life, the effects of Xanax only last a couple of hours for most people.

    How much Mogadon causes addiction?

    Mogadon is a long-acting benzodiazepine drug, which means it lingers in the system for longer than other drugs. So even those who do not use Mogadon every day can develop a physical dependence and experience withdrawal symptoms.
    While high doses of Mogadon increase the risk of addiction, even therapeutic doses can become a problem if the drug is used regularly over a longer period.

    How do I recognise Mogadon abuse?

    It can be tough to recognise Mogadon abuse, particularly as most people do not understand what abuse is. But consider the fact that taking Mogadon in a different way to how it was prescribed is abuse.
    If you take higher doses of your medication than those indicated on your prescription, or if you take it more often during the day, then this is classed as abuse. So too is taking the medication in a way that is not indicated. If you mix it with another sedative substance, or if you crush your pills and snort the powder for example, this is obviously abuse.
    Abuse of prescription medication also occurs when you take medication that was prescribed for another person.

    When to seek medical care?

    If you believe you might have taken too much Mogadon, it is important to seek help as soon as possible. The symptoms of a Mogadon overdose can develop within four hours and can end up being life-threatening.

    How do I get help for Mogadon addiction?

    If you believe you have developed an addiction to Mogadon, you should speak to your doctor in the first instance. He or she will assess your situation and will, if appropriate, refer you to your local drug treatment service.
    You can also self-refer yourself to your local centre or seek help from a support group in your local area such as Narcotics Anonymous; you will find details of the resources near to your home online.
    If you would like to speak to one of our fully trained advisors about the programmes that we offer to help you overcome addiction, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us via our helpline.

    When do Mogadon withdrawal symptoms start?

    As Mogadon is a longer-acting benzodiazepine drug, the onset of withdrawal symptoms may not begin for up to four days after stopping the drug or reducing the dosage. This is because it takes longer for Mogadon to be eliminated by the body than other shorter acting benzos.

    How long does Mogadon withdrawal last?

    The length of a Mogadon withdrawal varies from person to person, depending on circumstances and how the drug is withdrawn. In a rapid detoxification, the process may take just over a week. However, if a gradual reduction of the medication is used, withdrawal can last for many weeks, or even months.

    How much Temazepam causes addiction?

    Temazepam should be taken as directed by your doctor for no longer than four weeks. Taking it in higher doses than recommended can cause a physical dependence, but so too can taking it for a longer period than advised to.

    How do I recognise Temazepam abuse?

    It is important that you can recognise temazepam abuse in yourself or another person. If you are worried about yourself, the first sign of abuse is increasing the amount of the drug that you are taking in order to achieve the same level of relief. In another person, you might not notice a problem until this person’s behaviour begins to change.

    For example, if someone you love is becoming isolated and withdrawn and neglecting his or her responsibilities, it could be that temazepam abuse is to blame. If you know that a loved one has been prescribed this medication and you notice changes in his or her behaviour, you should look out for further signs of abuse such as loss of interest in activities or a preoccupation with the drug.

    When to seek medical care?

    If you are worried that you are already addicted to temazepam, then it is best to seek medical care as soon as possible. Tackling this issue is important and doing so sooner rather than later will improve your chances of a full recovery.

    Additionally, if you believe that you or someone you love may have taken a temazepam overdose, it is essential that you seek medical help immediately, particularly if another sedative substance such as alcohol or opiates was also taken.

    How do I get help for Temazepam addiction?

    A temazepam addiction can be treated by professional counsellors, therapists, and doctors. If you need help, talk to your doctor, visit your local fellowship support group, or speak to us here for advice. There are also information databases available online with information about resources in your local community.

    When do Temazepam withdrawal symptoms start?

    Withdrawal symptoms typically begin between one to four days after quitting temazepam, with the most intense symptoms usually starting after the fourth day. However, withdrawal is different for each person and there may be underlying factors that could affect how your detox progresses. These can include any health issues that you have or if you were also abusing another substance.

    How long does Temazepam withdrawal last?

    It is not possible to say exactly how long your temazepam withdrawal will last, but in general symptoms last anywhere between one to two weeks.

    How much Valium causes addiction?

    You may become tolerant to Valium very quickly, meaning that you do not get the same level of relief from it after a while. When this happens, you might begin to take higher doses than advised by your doctor, which can lead to a physical dependence. If you continue to abuse Valium in high doses, your risk for addiction will increase.

    How do I recognise Valium abuse?

    The first sign of Valium abuse is taking more of it than advised by your doctor. However, taking Valium that was prescribed for another person is also abuse, as is mixing it with another substance.

    When to seek medical care?

    If you are taking higher doses of Valium than your prescription states or are mixing it with alcohol or other drugs and notice the signs of overdose, it is vital that you get medical care immediately. Failure to seek help can result in unconsciousness, coma, and even death.

    You will also need to seek medical care if you believe you have developed an addiction to your medication. Addiction is indicated by an overwhelming urge to use Valium despite it having a negative impact on your life. If you are finding it difficult to function without Valium, it is crucial to seek help as soon as possible.

    How do I get help for Valium addiction?

    If you want to quit Valium, you should speak to your doctor for advice on how to access a programme of detox and rehabilitation. He or she will be able to refer you to your local drug treatment centre.
    If you would like details of the various programmes that are available in your area, you can find what you need via online information databases or you can speak to use here at UKAT to find out more about our clinics and the programmes we provide.

    When do Valium withdrawal symptoms start?

    Valium withdrawal symptoms typically begin within one to two days after medication cessation. Nevertheless, if you are a heavy user of the drug, you may find that it takes up to seven days before the first symptoms appear.

    How long does Valium withdrawal last?

    Valium withdrawal can last anywhere from a couple of weeks to several months. It all depends on how quickly the drug is withdrawn and the type of detox that you undertake. If you have a rapid detoxification, you can expect the withdrawal process to be over much quicker than if you were to gradually reduce your dose over the course of a few months.

    How serious are benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms compared to other drugs and alcohol?

    Withdrawing from benzodiazepines can be similar to withdrawing from alcohol, and there is always the risk of complications. In fact, benzos are one of the most difficult substances to withdraw from because of how severe symptoms can be. Moreover, due to the long half-life of these drugs, withdrawal can last for much longer than with other drugs. Some symptoms can continue for months, with some individuals still noticing the effects of withdrawal even after a year.

    How do I manage someone who does not want to stop taking benzodiazepines or z-drugs?

    If someone you care about has been abusing benzodiazepines or z-drugs and is refusing to get help or even acknowledge the problems exists, it is understandable that you might be getting frustrated. Nevertheless, you should not give up as there are things that you can do to encourage this person to get help.

    One of the most effective ways of getting someone to accept treatment for an addiction is with a family intervention. This is a process whereby a group of individuals close to the addict come together to have a meeting with their addicted loved one to talk about how the illness has been affecting their lives. Interventions can be very successful, particularly when an addict is refusing to get help and there is unquestionable evidence of the harm that his or her illness has caused to many different lives.

    Can I take myself off benzodiazepines? Is it safe to detox at home?

    It is never advisable to quit benzodiazepines suddenly because of the risk of severe withdrawal symptoms. If you want to stop taking your medication, you should speak to a medical professional about how to gradually reduce the dose.

    If you have a severe dependence on benzodiazepines, you will likely need to enter a detox facility to withdraw under the supervision of medical professionals. However, if you have been taking your medication for a short time, there is the possibility that you may be able to detox at home.

    It is important that you seek medical advice to find out the safest way for you to quit benzodiazepines.

    Can you die from benzodiazepine withdrawal?

    There is a risk of severe and even life-threatening symptoms when withdrawing from benzodiazepines. For this reason, it is never safe to abruptly stop taking your medication without medical intervention.

    The risk of severe complications increases in those who have been taking higher doses of the drug or who have been abusing it with other substances. Nonetheless, there are medications that can be prescribed to lessen the severity of withdrawal symptoms or to prevent the worst symptoms from occurring. These medications can only be prescribed by a medical professional and you will need to be carefully monitored throughout the detox process.

    Can medications help me detox from benzos?

    Medication is often used during detox from benzodiazepines. If you have been abusing a short-acting benzodiazepine, your doctor might suggest that it is replaced with a longer-acting one that will be gradually increased while the short-acting benzo is reduced. This will help to reduce any withdrawal symptoms.

    Other medications may be used to help relieve any discomfort that you experience during your detox. You might be prescribed medication to help relieve symptoms of anxiety that are commonly associated with withdrawal from benzos.

    What withdrawal problems can benzodiazepines cause?

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal can be a long process. There is the option for a rapid discontinuation, but for most people, the process can take weeks or even months. Furthermore, symptoms can be very unpleasant and painful. You might experience severe depression and extreme anxiety and may also suffer night sweats and muscle twitching.

    There is also the risk of more severe and frightening symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions, and distorted perception. If you have a severe dependence on benzodiazepines or underlying health problems, you could be affected by seizures and psychosis.

    Does benzodiazepine detox work?

    Detoxing from benzodiazepines can be a complicated process and it can last for a long time, but if you are committed to overcoming your dependence on this medication then yes, it can work.

    Most of those who want to withdraw from benzos underestimate the detox process and how difficult it can actually be, and many will return to drug use before the process is complete. You should know that benzodiazepine addiction is rarely a quick process, but with the right programme and support from experienced and qualified individuals, there is no reason why you cannot quit benzos for good.

    What is rapid benzodiazepine detoxification?

    While detoxing from benzodiazepines is often a gradual process that takes weeks if not months to complete, there is the option for a rapid detoxification programme that would see you complete the process in just over a week. With this type of detox, it will be necessary for benzodiazepines to be stopped abruptly and then a medication such as flumazenil will be used to provide relief from the symptoms that occur.

    As well as providing relief, flumazenil can help to eliminate benzos from your system. Rapid benzodiazepine detoxification tends to produce very few physical withdrawal symptoms, but it is recommended that it is combined with counselling and therapy to help deal with any psychological symptoms that occur.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing Ativan withdrawal?

    If you are a regular Ativan user and you begin noticing withdrawal symptoms within 6 to 12 hours of taking your last dose, then it is likely you are experiencing withdrawal. Pay attention to any of the following: insomnia, anxiety, agitation, headaches, nausea and vomiting, blurred vision, and increased heart rate and respiration. The presence of withdrawal symptoms indicates a level of tolerance. If left untreated, tolerance can become an addiction in short order.

    Can lorazepam withdrawal kill you?

    Although fatalities during lorazepam withdrawal are rare in clinical settings, it is still very possible. Withdrawal symptoms can be severe enough to induce coma and eventual death. People who try to withdraw at home face an even bigger risk.

    Can Ativan withdrawal cause seizures?

    Ativan withdrawal can absolutely cause seizures. In fact, seizures are among the most common withdrawal symptoms related to this drug. They can be safely managed by medical personnel.

    Does Ativan withdrawal cause depression?

    Ativan withdrawal may result in certain long-term symptoms continuing for weeks after treatment. One of them is depression. However, becoming depressed after stopping the drug is not a guarantee. Your chances of not developing clinical depression are greater than your chances of developing it.

    What does Ativan withdrawal feel like?

    This is a very difficult question to answer if you have not experienced Ativan withdrawal yourself. Medical professionals observe that patients routinely feel anxious and panicky during withdrawal. Many also feel agitated as well. If you can imagine such feelings, throw in things like headaches, nausea, and diarrhoea. That is what withdrawal feels like.

    What will help Ativan withdrawal?

    Withdrawing from Ativan is made easier with the use of certain medications like diazepam and SSRI antidepressants. These other medications make it easier to gradually step down from the highest doses of Ativan, thereby reducing withdrawal symptoms to some degree. Over-the-counter medications can help with headaches, nausea, etc.

    How do doctors ease Ativan withdrawal?

    Withdrawal is eased by tapering down. Doctors can direct taper or substitute taper, depending on which method they believe is most appropriate. Substitute tapering with the use of diazepam is becoming more common. Note that tapering does not completely eliminate withdrawal symptoms. It only reduces their severity.

    How do clinics minimise Ativan withdrawal?

    Ativan withdrawal is minimised the same way it is eased: through the use of prescription and over-the-counter medications. Where necessary, psychotherapeutic interventions are also utilised. Therapists attempt to minimise the psychological effects of withdrawal through various talking therapies designed to calm and soothe the patient.

    Is Ativan withdrawal dangerous?

    In a word, absolutely. All benzodiazepines are difficult to withdraw from due to the way they interact with the GABA neurotransmitter. Ativan is especially dangerous because of its relatively short half-life. Patients should withdraw from Ativan only under the care of medical personnel.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing Halcion withdrawal?

    When you have been taking Halcion for a prolonged period, you are likely to have a physical dependence. As such, you may experience withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit. If you notice that you are experiencing unpleasant symptoms such as headaches, anxiety, nausea, and mood swings when you try to quit or cut back on your use of Halcion, it is likely that you are going through withdrawal.

    Can Halcion withdrawal kill you?

    While fatal consequences from Halcion withdrawal are rare, there is a risk of life-threatening symptoms when suddenly stopping your medication. As your brain will have adapted to the presence of Halcion and has learned to rely on it for the production of its natural calming chemicals, a sudden cessation can potentially trigger symptoms such as seizures, which can be fatal if not managed correctly.

    Can Halcion withdrawal cause seizures?

    Seizures can be the result of an imbalance of chemicals in the brain. Medications such as Halcion stimulate production of the brain’s natural calming chemical, thus helping to maintain the balance. With prolonged Halcion use, the brain is unable to produce the level of calming chemicals that it requires to maintain this balance by itself. When you stop taking your medication, the brain can go into shock, and a sudden overactivity of excitatory chemicals can trigger symptoms such as seizures.

    Does Halcion withdrawal cause depression?

    There are many symptoms associated with Halcion withdrawal, depression being one of them. Many people will suffer depression before taking Halcion, which tends to be related to their poor quality of life due to insomnia. Since Halcion withdrawal can cause rebound insomnia, it is not uncommon for a return of depressive symptoms at the same time.

    What does Halcion withdrawal feel like?

    As with a detox from any other mood-altering substance, Halcion withdrawal can feel very unpleasant. The symptoms you experience may make you feel unwell and these feelings can persist for a couple of weeks. The good news, however, is that compared to longer-acting benzodiazepines, Halcion withdrawal tends to be quite short and most of the symptoms will disappear within a few weeks.

    What will help Halcion withdrawal?

    Certain medications can help to minimise the severity of a Halcion withdrawal. You may also find that holistic therapies such as meditation, massage, and mindfulness can relieve some of the symptoms that you experience such as depression and anxiety. They may also help to prevent cravings for the drug by reducing levels of stress and improving overall wellbeing.

    How to ease Halcion withdrawal?

    The severity of Halcion withdrawal can be eased with a gradual reduction of the medication rather than an abrupt cessation. Your doctor may also prescribe medications that can prevent many of the symptoms from occurring or lessen the impact of those that do.

    How to minimise Halcion withdrawal?

    Halcion withdrawal is most severe when the drug is stopped suddenly. It is for this reason that most detox programmes involve a gradual tapering of the dose over a number of weeks. This helps to minimise the effects and will make you more comfortable.

    Is Halcion withdrawal dangerous?

    Halcion withdrawal is dangerous if it is not managed properly. It is never advisable to quit your medication suddenly or to attempt a gradual reduction without seeking medical advice first. It is important to speak to your doctor about the correct tapering procedure before attempting to cut back on Halcion.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing Klonopin withdrawal?

    If you stop taking Klonopin and begin to feel unwell, it is likely you are experiencing withdrawal. Symptoms might include blurred vision, headache, and a rapid heartbeat. You may also notice that the symptoms that you began taking Klonopin for in the first place return; they may be worse than they were before you took your medication. These are known as rebound symptoms and are often the first to appear when the drug is withdrawn.

    Can Klonopin withdrawal kill you?

    Although fatal complications are rare with Klonopin withdrawal, there is a risk of life-threatening symptoms such as respiratory depression and seizures. It is important, therefore, that your withdrawal from this medication is managed properly. The best and safest way to detox is with a gradual reduction of the medication rather than an abrupt cessation, where the risk of severe complications would be higher.

    Can Klonopin withdrawal cause seizures?

    When Klonopin is suddenly withdrawn it can lead to a chemical imbalance in the brain, and this can trigger seizures in some individuals. The risk is higher among those who were taking the drug to treat seizures in the first place. If you have previously suffered seizures, your doctor may prescribe medication to prevent a recurrence of these when you stop taking Klonopin.

    Does Klonopin withdrawal cause depression?

    Depression is one of the symptoms that can occur with a Klonopin withdrawal. As Klonopin withdrawal can take a long time, during which you may experience a number of unpleasant symptoms, you may become depressed at the idea of there being no end in sight. If you are of the minority of people who experience protracted withdrawal symptom and your symptoms continue for many months, your risk of depression will be higher.

    What does Klonopin withdrawal feel like?

    Klonopin withdrawal is different for everyone and how you experience it will depend on several factors. If you have underlying medical issues, you may suffer more than someone who was quite healthy before taking Klonopin. If you have a history of mental health problems, then you may be more likely to suffer severe anxiety or depression.
    But if you choose to withdraw from Klonopin in a dedicated detox facility, there are many different psychological and pharmaceutical interventions that can be used to lessen the severity of withdrawal.

    What will help Klonopin withdrawal?

    There are a few methods for helping in Klonopin withdrawal. As well as medication that can relieve or prevent the symptoms of withdrawal, there are various holistic therapies that can be used. In a detox facility, you will be taught the basics of methods such as mindfulness and meditation, which have proved repeatedly to be useful in helping to relieve the symptoms of several types of substance withdrawal. Hypnotherapy may also be utilised, and you may find that other therapies like music therapy and art therapy are beneficial when it comes to distracting you from the unpleasant symptoms you might experience.

    How to ease Klonopin withdrawal?

    The best way to minimise the effects of Klonopin withdrawal is through a gradual reduction of your dosage. Continuing to receive smaller doses of the medication until you are ready to quit completely is considered the most effective way of easing Klonopin withdrawal.

    How to minimise Klonopin withdrawal?

    As abrupt discontinuation of Klonopin is associated with the highest risk for severe withdrawal symptoms, it is advisable to consider a gradual reduction of the medication if you want to minimise the severity of the process. Your doctor will offer advice about the best way to implement a tapering schedule.

    Is Klonopin withdrawal dangerous?

    Withdrawal from benzodiazepine drugs such as Klonopin is considered dangerous because of the risk of severe and sometimes life-threatening symptoms. It is, therefore, never recommended that you stop taking the medication without advice from your doctor. To do so can result in dangerous complications.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing Librium withdrawal?

    If you have tried to quit Librium or cut back on the amount of the drug that you are using and experience withdrawal symptoms that make you feel unwell, you are likely to be going through withdrawal.

    You might think that you have managed to break free from Librium with little impact if you stop taking your medication and do not experience any symptoms during the first few days. However, you should be aware that Librium does linger in the system for a number of days and this can cause the onset of withdrawal to be delayed. It is likely that you will not notice the first symptoms until around the third or fourth day.

    Can Librium withdrawal kill you?

    There is a risk of life-threatening symptoms associated with Librium withdrawal, but in a supervised facility the risk will be extremely low. The chances of fatal consequences are much higher when the drug is stopped suddenly or when attempting to quit Librium without medical supervision.

    Can Librium withdrawal cause seizures?

    Seizures are a risk factor with Librium withdrawal just as they are with all types of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The risk is higher for those with a history of seizures and may be the result of a sudden increase in excitatory chemicals within the brain when Librium is withdrawn.

    Can Librium withdrawal cause depression?

    Depression is often associated with Librium withdrawal, and while this can be caused by a biochemical disorder resulting from the removal of your medication, it can also be due to poor quality of life during prolonged withdrawal.

    What does Librium withdrawal feel like?

    You are likely to feel unwell during withdrawal from Librium. A variety of both physical and mental symptoms can occur while your brain and body attempt to get back to normal. It is for this reason that a gradual reduction of Librium is recommended. This can help to reduce the severity of symptoms.

    What will help Librium withdrawal?

    Certain medications can make withdrawing from Librium easier. These medications might include pain relief, antidepressants, and beta-blockers, which can all help ease symptoms. It may also be possible to prevent some symptoms from occurring by using a substitute benzodiazepine during the detox process.
    Holistic therapies such as meditation and mindfulness have also proven effective in relieving symptoms and preventing cravings.

    How to ease Librium withdrawal?

    Withdrawing from Librium often results in physical and mental symptoms but using a tapering schedule where your medication is reduced gradually over a period of weeks or months may ease the process and make you more comfortable. It might also help to prevent the worst symptoms from occurring.

    How to minimise Librium withdrawal?

    Before you try to detox from Librium, you should speak to your doctor for advice. If you do not yet have an addiction to your medication, you may be able to withdraw at home. However, just because you do not have an addiction does not mean that you do not have a physical dependence. It will therefore be necessary for you to reduce your dose of Librium slowly rather than stopping it suddenly.
    If you use a gradual reduction plan, your risk of severe symptoms will be reduced and you may even prevent the worst symptoms from occurring in the first place.

    Is Librium withdrawal dangerous?

    Librium withdrawal is dangerous when attempted without medical supervision. Trying to quit your medication suddenly could result in withdrawal symptoms that have the potential to be life-threatening.
    It is recommended that you detox in a dedicated facility under medical supervision as doing so will mean you are at virtually no risk throughout the process.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing temazepam withdrawal?

    If you have developed a dependence on temazepam and you try to quit or cut down on your use, then you are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms. If you start to feel unwell after cutting back or stopping your medication, it is likely that you are beginning the process of withdrawal. Look out for the earliest symptoms such as fatigue, anxiety, headaches, nausea, and sweating. If you experience these symptoms after quitting temazepam then it is a good idea to speak to your doctor.

    Can temazepam withdrawal kill you?

    If the symptoms of temazepam withdrawal become severe, they could have fatal consequences. It is therefore important that the process is effectively managed to reduce the severity of symptoms and to ensure your safety at all times.
    The risk of severe symptoms is higher in those who have been using temazepam chronically for a long period of time, although severe symptoms can also occur in those who were taking the recommended dose of the drug for a short time only.

    Can temazepam withdrawal cause seizures?

    Seizures are one of the more severe symptoms that can occur when temazepam is withdrawn. Because of the effect that temazepam has on the production of GABA, the brain’s natural calming chemical, a sudden withdrawal can lead to a dramatic imbalance of chemicals within the brain, which could cause seizures.

    Does temazepam withdrawal cause depression?

    There are many psychological symptoms associated with temazepam withdrawal, depression being one of them. In fact, the psychological symptoms such as depression can continue for many months after the drug is withdrawn.

    What does temazepam withdrawal feel like?

    Temazepam withdrawal can be quite uncomfortable, depending on how the detox is managed. Although benzodiazepines are not as intoxicating as substances such as alcohol, withdrawal can last for much longer, making you feel unwell for many weeks.
    Nevertheless, if the detox is effectively managed, it may be possible to reduce the severity of withdrawal symptoms or to prevent them from occurring at all.

    What will help temazepam withdrawal?

    Certain medications can help to lessen the severity of a temazepam withdrawal. Substituting your medication for a longer-acting benzodiazepine such as diazepam might help to prevent certain withdrawal symptoms from occurring.
    There may also be medication or nutritional supplements that will help to ease the symptoms that you experience, such as anxiety or aches and pains.

    How to ease temazepam withdrawal?

    Temazepam withdrawal can be eased with a gradual reduction of your dose rather than an abrupt cessation of the drug.

    How to minimise temazepam withdrawal?

    Substituting temazepam for another benzodiazepine can help to minimise the effects of withdrawal. By increasing the dose of one drug and decreasing the dose of the other, the severity of symptoms may be lessened.

    Is temazepam withdrawal dangerous?

    Because of the risk of serious complications, temazepam withdrawal is considered to be dangerous and so requires careful supervision. If you are withdrawing gradually at home, you will need to be alert to the early warning signs and contact your doctor if you think you may be experiencing severe symptoms.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing Mogadon withdrawal?

    If you try to cut back or quit Mogadon and you begin to experience symptoms such as headaches, loss of appetite, anxiety, nervousness, restlessness, or nausea, then it may be the case that you are having withdrawal symptoms. If these symptoms go away when you take your medication, it is likely that you are physically dependent on Mogadon.

    Can Mogadon withdrawal kill you?

    While it is highly unlikely that Mogadon withdrawal will be fatal if you detox in a dedicated facility, there is the risk of life-threatening withdrawal symptoms, so detoxing by yourself is never recommended or actively encouraged. In extreme cases, sudden cessation of Mogadon could cause breathing problems or seizures, which could be fatal if not dealt with as a medical emergency, but in a supervised facility the worst symptoms can be effectively managed or prevented.

    Can Mogadon cause seizures?

    A sudden cessation of Mogadon could trigger seizures due to a lack of calming chemicals in the brain. As Mogadon works to enhance production of the brain’s natural inhibitory chemical GABA, abruptly withdrawing the medication can lead to an overactivity of brain chemicals, subsequently triggering seizures, life-threatening in extreme cases.

    Does Mogadon withdrawal cause depression?

    Depression can be a symptom of Mogadon withdrawal. It may be caused by the length and severity of the detox and withdrawal process. Many people trying to break free from Mogadon addiction will see no light at the end of the tunnel, particularly those who suffer from protracted withdrawal syndrome. This can lead to feelings of depression.

    Depression may also be caused by a biochemical disorder as a consequence of the withdrawal of your medication. You may find that feelings of depression come and go; for some, depression can be so severe that it leads to suicidal thoughts.

    What does Mogadon withdrawal feel like?

    Withdrawing from Mogadon can make you feel quite ill. As your brain and body try to restore normality, you may suffer from a variety of symptoms that can make you feel quite unwell. However, in a dedicated facility the impact of such symptoms can be lessened with medication and psychological interventions.

    What will help Mogadon withdrawal?

    There are several techniques that can be used to help with Mogadon withdrawal. You may find that meditation or mindfulness helps to take your mind off the symptoms you are experiencing. Other holistic treatments, such as music or art therapy, might also be utilised to help you cope with the severity of the withdrawal.

    If your symptoms are severe, medication may be administered by a fully trained medical professional – but only if appropriate to your situation. You may also find that tapering your dose of Mogadon is preferable to an abrupt cessation as this can prevent the worst symptoms from occurring and can lessen the severity of those that do.

    How to ease Mogadon withdrawal?

    Your doctor is likely to suggest that you gradually reduce your Mogadon dosage to ease the symptoms of withdrawal. Whether you are withdrawing at home (not recommended) or in a detox facility, gradual reduction is often considered the best option when quitting a benzodiazepine drug such as Mogadon.

    How to minimise Mogadon withdrawal?

    If you are hoping to minimise the impact that Mogadon withdrawal has, it is important to speak to your doctor about a tapering programme. This can be done in some circumstances at home under the guidance and supervision of a doctor. Do not attempt to quit Mogadon by yourself as this can be dangerous.

    Is Mogadon withdrawal dangerous?

    Mogadon withdrawal can be extremely dangerous if you try to quit suddenly on your own. It is important that any benzodiazepine withdrawal is carefully managed to limit the impact on your mental and physical wellbeing.
    To prevent the worst symptoms from occurring, detoxing in a dedicated facility is highly recommended. This way, you will be at virtually no risk as staff will be on hand to ensure your comfort and safety at all times.

    How will I know if I’m experiencing Valium withdrawal?

    Physical dependence can occur when Valium is abused, but even if you have been taking it exactly as prescribed you may still become physically dependent on it. If so, you are likely to experience withdrawal symptoms when you stop using it.
    If you stop taking Valium and begin to experience symptoms such as anxiety, mood swings, headaches, and nausea, it is likely that you are experiencing withdrawal.

    Can Valium withdrawal kill you?

    It is rare for Valium withdrawal to be fatal, but that does not mean the risk is not present. To minimise the risk of life-threatening withdrawal symptoms such as seizures or respiratory distress, it is important to seek medical advice before trying to quit the medication. Never stop taking Valium on your own, as this could result in fatal consequences.

    Can Valium withdrawal cause seizures?

    When you take Valium, it works by stimulating the GABA receptors in the brain. By doing this, it calms down activity within the brain. Nevertheless, over time, your brain will adapt and rewire itself around the presence of Valium so that it learns to rely on it for the production of GABA. When you stop taking your medication, the brain is unable to produce the amount of GABA that it needs to maintain the balance of chemicals. With a sudden increase in excitatory chemicals and not enough GABA to calm things down, there is a risk of seizure.

    Does Valium withdrawal cause depression?

    There are many different symptoms associated with Valium withdrawal, depression being one of them. This can be the result of the imbalance of chemicals in the brain when Valium is withdrawn, but it can also occur in those who experience PAWS, as they often feel as if there is no end to their symptoms.

    What Does Valium withdrawal feel like?

    Valium withdrawal is different for everyone and what it feels like really depends on how effectively it is managed. If you are a heavy user of Valium or have been using it for a prolonged period, you may experience more severe withdrawal symptoms. However, in a detox facility, the process can be managed so that the worst symptoms do not occur. Additionally, medical staff can administer medication to ease any discomfort you are experiencing.

    What will help Valium withdrawal?

    Various medications can assist the easing any discomfort associated with Valium withdrawal, but you can also use distraction or relaxation techniques to keep your mind off any symptoms that you are experiencing. Your doctor might also prescribe anti-anxiety medications or antidepressants to relieve these symptoms.

    How to ease Valium withdrawal?

    In a detox facility, your comfort and safety are assured. Staff will monitor your progress at all times and will be able to help ease any symptoms that you experience with the use of medication, nutritional supplements, and relaxation therapies.

    How to minimise Valium withdrawal?

    The best way to minimise Valium withdrawal is with a gradual dose reduction. Rather than quitting the medication suddenly, which can be extremely dangerous, it is recommended you taper the dose slowly over the course of weeks or months. This will help prevent severe symptoms from occurring.

    Is Valium withdrawal dangerous?

    If you choose to detox from Valium under medical supervision in a detox clinic, your risk of harm will be minimal. Nevertheless, Valium withdrawal can be extremely dangerous if it is not managed correctly. You should therefore never try to quit your medication by yourself. Doing so could see the onset of severe and life-threatening symptoms.

    How much Xanax causes withdrawal?

    Xanax withdrawal is not necessarily dependent on the amount of the drug a person has used. While it is true that long-term use of higher doses can make for a more difficult withdrawal, a person can become addicted to the drug even in small doses if taken long enough. Any addiction will produce withdrawal once the addict stops using.

    Can Xanax withdrawal kill you?

    Though we do not like to talk about it, Xanax withdrawal can absolutely kill you. You can experience acute withdrawal symptoms that become protracted symptoms over time. These can include increased heart rate, seizures, and suicidal thoughts – all of which can be fatal.

    What helps Xanax withdrawal?

    There are three things detox clinics use to help patients get through Xanax withdrawal. These are prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, and psychological interventions. A gradual approach to withdrawal is also a tremendous help.

    When Does Xanax withdrawal start?

    The average user begins seeing early onset symptoms within 6 to 12 hours of the most recent dose of Xanax. Some patients may show symptoms earlier; others may hold out longer.

    Why does Xanax withdrawal cause seizures?

    Where GABA is one of the most powerful inhibitory chemicals in the brain, glutamate is just the opposite. It excites the brain. Seizures during withdrawal are caused by a combination of too little GABA and too much glutamate. The brain is overly stimulated, and seizures occur as a result.

    How do you detox Xanax from your body?

    Experts say the safest way to detox from Xanax is to gradually reduce the amount of the drug being used. A 10-to-15-day withdrawal schedule sems to be the preference among doctors.

    What can I expect from Xanax withdrawal?

    Xanax withdrawal is likely to be an endurance event. You can expect to be uncomfortable, tired, and lethargic. Expect withdrawal symptoms to begin peaking anywhere from day 5 to day 15, gradually subsiding thereafter. Finally, remember that one or two withdrawal symptoms may linger for months or even years afterward.

    How does codeine withdrawal affect my health?

    Withdrawing from codeine can result in a range of symptoms, which can end up being mild to severe in intensity. They are likely to make you feel unwell, but they will pass. You may feel as though you have the flu, as opiate withdrawal causes symptoms that are similar.
    Sweating, headaches, vomiting, fever, and muscle aches are all common during codeine withdrawal and you might also notice psychological symptoms such as depression. However, with time, all these symptoms should disappear.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Your personal and medical information will be kept completely private by any organisation taking care of you as you try to withdraw from codeine. It is natural to worry about others finding out that you are in treatment for addiction, but you can rest assured that your details and information will not be shared with a third party without your permission.

    Am I addicted?

    It is hard to tell when substance use has crossed a line to addiction, but by examining your behaviour and your use of codeine, you can get a clearer picture as to what your situation is. If you feel the need to use more codeine to achieve a certain level of satisfaction or relief, it is probably because you have become tolerant to the medication.

    Nevertheless, addiction is more than just having a tolerance to a particular substance or even a physical dependence. It is more to do with how much control you have over your use. If you are unable to resist the urge to use, even when it is having obvious negative consequences for yourself or your loved ones, you almost certainly have an addiction and need professional intervention.

    How serious is codeine detox?

    Although detox from opioid drugs is rarely fatal, it is important to seek professional help as there is the risk that complications could occur without treatment. Your detox needs to be effectively managed to prevent issues such as dehydration from persistent vomiting or diarrhoea.
    The development of codeine withdrawal psychosis is also something that needs to be managed properly as this can lead to paranoid delusions and the subsequent risk that you could harm yourself or another person.

    Can medications help me detox from codeine?

    As a range of symptoms can occur during codeine withdrawal, a variety of medications can help. For mild pain, medications such as ibuprofen or aspirin might be prescribed. If you are experiencing nausea or vomiting, your care team might prescribe anti-nausea tablets, and for diarrhoea, medications such as loperamide can be useful.
    Anti-anxiety medication helps to prevent or ease symptoms such as sweating, agitation, cramps, and muscle aches, and for severe symptoms, an opioid replacement such as buprenorphine or methadone can help.

    Can I die from codeine withdrawal?

    Deaths from codeine withdrawal are extremely rare, but it is important to be aware of the risk of a return to your medication after a period of abstinence. Because you are likely to have developed a tolerance to codeine while you were using it, you may have needed higher doses to get the relief you desired at the time.

    What most people do not realise is that after a period of abstinence, tolerance reduces significantly. Taking the same amount of codeine as you were taking before could put you at risk of an overdose, which could be fatal if not treated immediately.

    How to detox from codeine?

    It is recommended that detox from codeine take place in a supervised facility to ensure your comfort and safety. However, if you have a physical dependence without addiction and want to stop using your medication, it is recommended that you detox slowly. Your doctor is likely to give you a tapering schedule to follow, which will involve a gradual reduction of your dose over the course of a few weeks or months.

    For those with an addiction, a detox in a dedicated facility might also involve a gradual reduction of codeine, but over a shorter period. Nevertheless, it is more likely that you will stop taking your medication suddenly and will be treated with other medication as appropriate to ease any symptoms you are experiencing.

    What happens during codeine rehab?

    When you begin a treatment programme for codeine rehab, you can look forward to learning more about your illness and why you have been affected. A big part of rehab is about dealing with the underlying issues that may have contributed to your addictive behaviour. It is important that these issues are identified and addressed so that you can move on.

    Rehab will also help you to learn the positive ways that you can deal with the stresses of daily life. You will learn about the temptations and cues that trigger your behaviour so that you can avoid them, and you will learn new methods for dealing with any cravings that might occur.

    How long does codeine rehab last?

    Codeine rehab programmes can last for weeks or months, depending on whether these are inpatient or outpatient based. Most inpatient programmes run for between four and six weeks but can continue for up to twelve weeks if you need more complex treatment. Longer programmes tend to be required for those dealing with more than one type of addiction or those with an addiction coupled with a mental health disorder.

    Outpatient programmes run for much longer because they are far less intensive. Instead of having many hours of treatment every day as you would in an inpatient programme, you might have just a few hours of treatment each week in an outpatient setting.

    Codeine Rehab: Away from home or not?

    The question of where to have codeine treatment is an important one. Weighing up your preferences with needs is crucial. Some people want to stay at home while they are going through rehabilitation because they want to be around those they love. In this case, an outpatient programme is preferable.

    Nevertheless, it is important to remember that not everyone will benefit from an outpatient scenario. There are others who would struggle to stay clean and sober if they were surrounded by the stresses and triggers of everyday life. For these individuals then, inpatient programmes are the wiser choice. The secure and structured environment of an inpatient programme means that there is no choice but to focus on treatment and getting well.

    Why seek help for codeine addiction?

    As with almost every other type of addiction, codeine addiction is unlikely to go away without treatment. Those who are affected may hope that by doing nothing, their situation will somehow resolve itself, but this is not likely.
    If you are affected by codeine addiction, getting help sooner rather than later is important. The sooner you get help, the sooner you can get your life back on track and the sooner you can start living a healthy life again.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    Private addiction treatment can be expensive and the thoughts of paying for a private programme often prevents some people from reaching out for help. Many believe that addiction rehab is only accessible to those with plenty of money. This is not the case.
    In the UK, free programmes are available for those struggling with addiction and are provided by the NHS, charities, and local support groups. To find out more about your options, you can check online information databases or speak to your doctor.

    What factors into the cost of addiction treatment?

    Addiction treatment provided by private clinics varies in price. The level of luxury of the clinic, the reputation of the provider, and the length of the programme all play a role in how much you end up paying for treatment.
    You may find that a smaller, intimate clinic with more one-on-one care is dearer than a larger facility with high numbers of staff and can accommodate many more patients at one time.

    Am I addicted to codeine?

    It is difficult to know if you are physically dependent on codeine or if you have an addiction. If you have never tried to quit, you are unlikely to have even considered the possibility that you have an addiction until a loved one raised the issue.
    What you should know is that if someone you love has suggested you may have a problem, it is likely that your use of codeine has been affecting your behaviour. A physical dependence is signified by the presence of withdrawal symptoms when the effects of codeine wear off.

    If you are addicted, you will probably feel a compelling urge to use codeine and will be unable to quit even if you want to. You may also find that your use of the drug is affecting your ability to live a normal life as well as it having a negative impact on your relationships. Despite all of this, you will continue to use the drug if you are addicted because you will be powerless to resist.

    Why do people start taking codeine?

    Codeine use usually begins with a prescription from a doctor. Codeine is used for the treatment of mild to moderate pain and can be a very effective treatment when used as prescribed. There are others, however, who will deliberately take codeine for its sedative and euphoric effects.

    Can misuse of these OTC medicines lead to addiction?

    Over-the-counter medications are commonly considered completely safe; many people do not even realise that their use constitutes abuse. Codeine is not recommended for long-term use, but many individuals continue to take it regularly, unaware of the potential for addiction.
    Abuse of codeine, or even prolonged use at recommended doses, can lead to an increased tolerance, the development of a physical dependence, and addiction.

    How can these OTC medicine overdoses be treated?

    Emergency medical treatment is required for a codeine overdose. Because there is a serious risk of harm or even death, it is vital to seek medical care as soon as possible if you believe you or someone you love has taken too much codeine.
    Treatment will depend on the symptoms being displayed.

    For example, if the person is suffering from breathing difficulties, artificial ventilation may be used. An opioid antidote known as Naloxone might also be administered to reverse the effects of the overdose.
    Activated charcoal, which can prevent any more the drug from being absorbed by the stomach, could also be offered.

    How can I spot codeine addiction?

    If you are worried that you might have an addiction to codeine, it is important to think about how much control you have over your use of the medication. If you have tried to quit or cut back on your use but found yourself unable to do so because of withdrawal symptoms, you may have developed a physical dependence to your medication. This tends to be the precursor for addiction.

    If you are addicted, you are likely to continue abusing codeine even if it is having a negative impact on daily life. You may be preoccupied with the medication to the point where you are unable to think of anything else.

    What is the goal of codeine addiction treatment?

    Codeine addiction treatment is designed to help you break the physical cycle of abuse and tackle the underlying emotional and psychological issues associated with the illness.

    How bad is codeine addiction?

    As with any other addiction, codeine addiction has the potential to cause a lot of harm to your life and the lives of those around you. Continued regular abuse of an opiate drug such as codeine can result in a plethora of health problems, some of which could become life-threatening.
    You might also suffer relationship problems because of your addiction, and unless you get treatment, these relationships could end up being pushed to breaking point.

    How to cure codeine addiction?

    Codeine addiction can never be completely cured, but it is possible to overcome your addiction and go on to live a full and healthy sober life without ever suffering a relapse. Committing to a comprehensive programme of recovery that includes a detox and rehabilitation followed by aftercare support is the best way to achieve permanent recovery.

    How to help someone who is addicted to codeine?

    If you are worried about a loved one who you believe might be addicted to codeine, it is important that you address the issue head-on. You might be hoping that by doing nothing the problem will go away, but this is unlikely to happen. It is far more likely that the situation will only get worse, so it is vital that you broach the subject with the affected person.

    How do drug abuse and drug addiction develop?

    Most people who abuse prescription drugs and develop an addiction to them will do so unintentionally. It is usually an increased tolerance to the effects of the drug that leads to abuse. When a drug such as codeine becomes less effective, the temptation to increase the dose is high. Doing this can lead to physical dependence, which in turn results in withdrawal symptoms when the effects of the drug wear off. A cycle of abuse and withdrawal usually ensues, significantly increasing the risk for addiction.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    It is important to be alert to the signs of drug abuse in teenagers, however hard these are to spot initially. Look for sudden changes in his or her behaviour coupled with physical symptoms such as slurred speech, dizziness, and disorientation. If you are worried, it might be worthwhile looking for evidence of substance abuse, such as empty pill packets.

    Are heroin and codeine the same thing?

    While heroin and codeine are both classed as opioid drugs, they are not the same in terms of strength and addictive potential. Although both are derived from morphine, heroin is much more potent and has a much higher potential for abuse. Moreover, while codeine is a prescription drug used to treat mild to moderate pain, heroin is an illegal substance with no accepted medical benefits.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to codeine?

    If someone you love has been prescribed codeine for the treatment of pain, it is important to be alert to the signs of abuse and addiction. If this person’s behaviour has changed, and if he or she has become preoccupied with codeine, it may be the case that an addiction has developed.

    What does codeine treatment involve?

    Codeine treatment usually involves a detox followed by rehabilitation. Both are required to overcome an addiction, as detox treats the physical element of the illness while rehabilitation tackles the emotional and psychological issues.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    If you are worried that someone you love has been abusing codeine and may be addicted, it is important to act as soon as possible. For advice on how to broach the subject with the person, you can speak to your doctor or call us here at UKAT.

    When to go to rehab for codeine addiction?

    Getting help for codeine addiction is essential. It is an illness that will not go away if you do nothing. If you have tried to quit or even cut back on your codeine use without success, it could be the case that you have an addiction. If so, it is important to seek help immediately. Call us today for information on how to access a programme of rehabilitation.

    Can meditation help you beat addiction?

    Withdrawal from mood-altering substances such as opiates can often lead to symptoms like depression and anxiety. With meditation, these symptoms can be relieved. Those who practice meditation notice an improvement in both depression and anxiety. They also tend to develop better sleep patterns, helping to improve their overall wellbeing.

    What are the causes & risk factors of opiate addiction?

    There is no single cause of opiate addiction. There are actually a number of risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing it. For example, a family history of addiction can dramatically increase the chances of becoming addicted to a mood-altering substance such as opioid medication.

    Mental health disorders can also increase the risk for addiction as many people will abuse mood-altering chemicals to help relieve symptoms associated with their condition, such as anxiety or depression.

    While opiates are considered safe to use over a short period of time, regular use can increase the risk of dependence and addiction. Moreover, if you abuse your medication, your risk will also increase. Taking more medication than advised to or mixing it with other sedative substances can dramatically increase the risk for addiction.

    What is the treatment for opiate addiction?

    Treatment for opiate addiction comprises a comprehensive recovery programme of detoxification, rehabilitation, and aftercare. Detox is usually the first part of the process and is required to help break the cycle of abuse. It begins when you quit opiates and your brain and body naturally begins to heal.

    Where can I find help, treatment, and support for opioid addiction?

    There are many options available for those struggling with addiction in the UK. Treatment programmes tend to be either inpatient or outpatient based and are provided by various organisations. The NHS and many charities provide outpatient-based programmes, which are typically accessed free of charge. To access such programmes, you can get in touch with your doctor or look for details of providers online via various information databases.

    Where else can I find help?

    Help is also available from local support groups within your community. Fellowship support groups are a great resource and are ideally used alongside a programme of detox and rehabilitation. By joining a fellowship support group, you can access regular meetings with other recovering addicts, who will be there to offer support and advice as you progress on your recovery journey.

    How much opiate causes withdrawal?

    When taken as directed for a short period of time, opiate medication can be highly effective. However, when you take more than the recommended dose, you are increasing your risk of developing a physical dependence that will cause withdrawal symptoms should you try to quit.

    You should also be aware that even when taken in therapeutic doses, opiate medication can cause dependence and withdrawal, particularly if the medication is taken for a prolonged period.

    How to beat opiate addiction?

    To overcome opiate addiction, you will need to quit your medication and make changes to your behaviour. You will need to learn how to live without mood-altering chemicals and develop strategies for dealing with temptations and triggers as these arise.

    How to treat opiate addiction?

    You can expect a treatment programme that has been tailored to your requirements and designed to be most effective in helping you to overcome your addiction once and for all.

    This type of treatment programme is designed to treat the mind, body, and spirit as a whole, but the precise treatments used will depend on various circumstances. These include the severity of your illness, your overall physical and mental wellbeing, and your likes and dislikes.

    How do drug abuse and drug addiction develop?

    Drug abuse often occurs unintentionally, particularly in the case of prescription drugs such as opiates. When medication designed to relieve pain becomes less effective, as so often happens with opiates, the natural response might be to increase the dose.

    Many people do not realise that this is a form of drug abuse and believe that because they have been prescribed opiates by a doctor, these medications are completely safe. As the person builds up a tolerance to the effects of the drug though, he or she will need more of it to achieve the same level of relief. Unfortunately, increasing the dose can result in a physical dependence and a cycle of abuse that can be difficult to break. This is usually when an addiction develops.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    It can be difficult to know when teenagers are abusing drugs because many of the signs and symptoms associated with drug abuse are also considered ‘normal’ behaviour for teenagers going through emotional and physical changes.

    It is important not to jump to conclusions, but you should still be alert to the warning signs, such as a change in performance at school, a change in friends, mood swings, secretive behaviour, and a sudden lack of interest in hobbies or activities. If these behavioural changes are coupled with physical symptoms such as constricted pupils, excessive yawning, changes in appetite, and fatigue, your child may be abusing drugs and you will need to act as quickly as you can.

    Are heroin and opiates the same thing?

    While heroin comes from the same family of drugs as opiate medications, it has no medical benefit and is an illegal drug. Opiates are prescription drugs used to treat moderate to severe pain, while heroin is an illegal opiate designed to induce feelings of pleasure and contentment.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to opiates?

    If someone you love has been prescribed opioids and you believe that he or she may have a problem, you should be alert to changes in behaviour. If the person continues to take the drug even though it is having obvious negative effects on his or her life, it is likely that he or she has developed an addiction.

    What does opiates treatment involve?

    Treatment for opiate addiction involves a detoxification to break the physical cycle of abuse, rehabilitation to tackle the emotional and psychological element of the illness, and aftercare to help with ongoing sobriety maintenance. During treatment, it is likely that a combination of medication, behavioural modification, and holistic therapies will be used.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    If you believe that someone you love has developed an addiction to opiates, it is important to speak out. Your natural reaction may be to hope that you are wrong because you do not want to raise the subject for fear of upsetting the individual in question. However, unless you speak out and express your concerns, your loved one’s situation is only likely to get worse.

    You can speak to your doctor about how to get help for your loved one or you can talk to us here at UKAT for advice on how to handle the situation.

    When to go to rehab for opiate addiction?

    If you believe that you have developed an addiction to your opiate medication, it is likely that you will need professional help to recover. The sooner you get help, the sooner you can get your life back on track. Accessing a programme of rehabilitation can help you to overcome the underlying issues associated with your illness and improve your chances of a full recovery.

    What happens during opiate rehab?

    You will learn more about why you became addicted and what triggers your addictive behaviour. Group therapy sessions will allow you to learn from other recovering addicts and will offer a supportive environment in which you can learn ways of avoiding a relapse going forward.

    How long does opiate rehab last?

    The length of your rehab treatment will depend on the type of programme you have chosen. If you choose inpatient treatment, you can expect your programme to last between four and twelve weeks. Outpatient programmes may continue for much longer than this.

    Opiate Rehab: Away from home or not?

    Where you choose to have treatment is usually a matter of personal preference and convenience. Choosing to be treated in a local facility has some obvious benefits, not least of which being ease of access. The closer your rehab clinic is to your home, the easier it will be for you and your family members to get there.

    In addition, many local employers offer placement programmes for those in recovery from addiction and this could lead to job opportunities once you are back on your feet. If you choose to recovery in a clinic that is in another region, these job offers may not be appropriate for you.

    Having said that, there are some benefits to having treatment away from home. If you live in a large city, you might benefit from heading out to the countryside for treatment where it is quieter and more peaceful. You may also prefer to be away from your local community where nobody knows you.

    Why seek help for opiate addiction?

    Treatment for opiate addiction is vital if you want to get your life back under control. Addiction is a progressive illness that will continue to get worse if you do not act. You might be hoping that your current situation will resolve itself with time, or that once you stop taking your medication, that things will get back to normal. However, if you have developed an addiction, quitting your medication will not be as easy as you might think.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    Not all addiction treatment in the UK is provided privately, so if you cannot afford to pay for rehab, you can still access great care. The NHS and charity organisations offer outpatient programmes free of charge, so you can speak to your doctor for a referral or refer yourself if you prefer. To find out more about the options available to you, check out an online information database, where you will find details of the various treatment programmes in your area.

    What factors into the cost of addiction treatment?

    The cost of addiction treatment can vary greatly from one facility to another. The price you pay is likely to be influenced by many factors such as the type of facility you choose and where it is located.
    You can expect to pay more for luxurious clinics that are more like upmarket hotels than hospitals. The reputation of the clinic may also be a factor in how much you pay. Furthermore, the length of your stay will also affect the price.

    Am I addicted to opiate?

    It is hard to tell whether you have a physical dependence to opiates or a full-blown addiction as one usually precedes the other and, more often than not, the two occur concurrently. If you have a physical dependence on opiates, you will experience withdrawal symptoms whenever you try to stop taking them.

    With an addiction, you will be compelled to use your medication and will feel as though you are unable to function without them. Your use of opiates will begin to interfere with your ability to live a normal life and even though you know that taking your medication is likely to cause harm to you and your loved ones, you will take it anyway.

    Why do people start taking opiate?

    Most people begin taking opioids to treat a medical condition. They will be prescribed these drugs by a doctor for moderate to severe pain, with many believing they are completely safe to take. There are some individuals who take them for recreational purposes though.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    If you are worried that you may have an addiction, there are certain signs that could indicate you have a problem. For example, you might be experiencing significant cravings for your medication and you may be using it to help you feel ‘normal’. You might be preoccupied with the drug and think about it constantly, and you could become defensive or angry with anyone who suggests your use of it is out of control.

    You may have lost interest in things that you used to enjoy, such as spending time with loved ones or taking part in hobbies or activities. You might be using more of your medication than advised by your doctor or using it in a way that was not prescribed.

    If your use of opioids is taking over your life and crowding out everything else, and if you are unable to quit even if you want to, then it is likely that you have an addiction and are in need of professional help.

    How does opiate withdrawal affect my health?

    You are likely to feel unwell during opiate withdrawal. Many people liken opiate withdrawal to having a severe bout of flu. Symptoms such as achy muscles, chills and fever are common. However, these symptoms will pass and when you are free from opiates, you can expect your health to improve.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Whoever provides your treatment for opiate addiction has a duty to protect your private information. Anything that is discussed will be kept completely confidential and if you would prefer if others did not know about your treatment, you can rest assured that they will not find out unless you decide to tell them yourself.

    Am I addicted?

    Coming to terms with addiction can be tough and many individuals find it difficult to spot the signs of abuse and addiction, particularly in themselves. Nevertheless, if you are worried about your use of opiates and believe you may have an addiction, it is worth taking some time to consider how you use these drugs and how much control you have over your use.

    For example, if you are abusing opiates and are taking more than the amount recommended by your doctor to achieve the feelings you desire, then you may be in trouble. However, if you are struggling to control your use of opiates and use them even when doing so could have a negative impact on everyday life, it is likely that you have an addiction.

    How serious is opiate detox?

    Unlike withdrawal from substances such as alcohol or benzodiazepines, opioid withdrawal is rarely life-threatening or dangerous in and of itself. However, detox can be uncomfortable, and you may suffer from symptoms that are akin to having severe flu.

    During an opiate detox, there is the risk that you could develop cravings that are so intense that they become what is known as opioid withdrawal psychosis. This could result in you harming yourself or others due to false beliefs. There is also the risk of overdose if you return to opioid use after a period of detoxification as your tolerance to the effects of the drug can significantly reduce, even after just a few days of abstinence.

    Can medications help me detox from opiates?

    Medical professionals often utilise a few different medications to help with withdrawal. These can include substitute opioids that will prevent the worst symptoms from occurring or other medications that may ease any discomfort caused by symptoms that do occur.

    Can I die from opiate withdrawal?

    While the symptoms that occur because of opiate withdrawal are rarely severe enough to cause fatal consequences, your underlying mental and physical health can influence the severity of the process.

    Complications are rare and more often than not deaths from opiate withdrawal occur as a result of overdose when an individual makes a return to opiate use after a period of abstinence.

    How to detox from opiates?

    It is generally agreed that the best way to detox from opiates is in a dedicated detox facility. Within such a facility, medical staff can create a tailored plan that includes medication if appropriate. It may be the case that your dosage of opiates is gradually reduced and a substitute drug is introduced to lessen the severity of the detox. However, your detox provider may feel that a sudden cessation of the medication is appropriate and will administer pharmacological treatment if required.

    Can misuse of these OTC medicines lead to addiction?

    Yes, misuse of over-the-counter medications can lead to both abuse and addiction. Morphine addiction is rare in clinical settings because patients are strictly monitored by doctors and nurses. And even when patients use prescribed morphine at home, addiction is rare as long as the drug is used as directed. Abuse and addiction become problems when a person uses morphine in any way other than as directed by a doctor.

    How can these OTC medicine overdoses be treated?

    Overdoses are generally treated by either counteracting the effects of the drug in question or preventing further absorption. In the case of morphine, a drug known as naloxone has proven effective at reversing its effects – as long as it is administered during the early stages of overdose.

    When administering naloxone is not an option, another possible treatment is administering activated charcoal. This will prevent any further absorption of morphine by the body. Then it is a matter of waiting until the effects of the morphine wear off.

    Whether naloxone or activated charcoal are used, medical personnel will keep a close eye on respiration and heart rate. Further intervention may be required to prevent respiratory or cardiac arrest.

    How can I spot morphine addiction?

    The best way to spot a possible morphine addiction is to look for some of the tell-tale signs exhibited by someone you know who is using the drug. For example, a morphine addict will continually shop around for new prescriptions among multiple doctors. That person might also look for opportunities to buy morphine online or on the street.

    You can also look for a variety of physical and social signs. A morphine addict will demonstrate periods of confusion, lethargy, and even loss of consciousness. The person is likely to withdraw from personal relationships, avoid social contact, and have trouble keeping up at work or school. Finally, a morphine addict will spend an inordinate amount of time and money attempting to secure more of the drug.

    What is the goal of morphine addiction treatment?

    Clinics pursue a number of different goals with morphine addiction treatment. The first goal is to prevent any further damage to health by breaking the physical dependence on the drug. Once physical dependence has been addressed, the body can begin the process of healing itself. The second goal of addressing psychological dependence follows.

    The third goal is to utilise rehabilitative therapies to help recovering patients understand their addictive behaviours. The point here is to help them better understand their own tendencies so that strategies for avoiding relapse can be implemented. That takes us to the fourth and final goal of aftercare.

    Aftercare picks up where detox and rehab leave off. The primary goal of aftercare is to prevent relapse within that first year following formal treatment. Successfully doing so greatly increases the chances of permanent recovery.

    How bad is morphine addiction?

    Determining how bad an addiction might be is an exercise in relative judgement. Be that as it may, morphine addiction does include some fairly serious consequences. In that respect, morphine addiction is bad.

    How to cure morphine addiction?

    Like any other addiction, the only true cure for morphine addiction is permanent abstinence. Detox, rehab, and aftercare are all designed to achieve permanent abstinence. Whether or not a patient succeeds depends on how he or she responds to treatment. In some cases, permanent abstinence is achieved on the first try. In other cases, though, the patient has to undergo treatment multiple times before being cured.

    How to help someone who is addicted to morphine?

    First and foremost, do not enable the person. In other words, do not help him or her continue feeding the addiction. Don’t make excuses, do not provide the funds, etc. Next, you can help by continually showing the addict the proper amount of love and support. You can do this without enabling. Let the person know that you are there and available should he or she decide to seek treatment. Express your willingness to help find the right treatment.

    How do drug abuse and drug addiction develop?

    Drug abuse begins with drug use. Once a person begins to lose a measure of control, he or she is considered to be an abuser. Addiction is present when a user loses all control and begins acting based on compulsion.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    Drug problems affect judgement and mental performance. Your teen might start making poor decisions. Grades will fall, and the teen will gradually become less and less reliable. The child may also exhibit a level of lethargy and lack of motivation that is unusual even for teens.

    Are heroin and morphine the same thing?

    Though heroin and morphine are both opiates, they are different drugs. Morphine is compound first isolated from the opium poppy back in the early 19th century. It has been used as a painkiller ever since. Heroin is a separate drug derived from morphine. It is created by introducing a variety of chemicals to morphine and then processing the resulting mixture.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to morphine?

    A morphine addiction can be recognised if certain warning signs and symptoms are observed. Beginning with the symptoms, family members can look for things like regular constipation, breathing difficulties, kidney problems, and so forth. Warning signs are more social and behavioural than physical.

    A person addicted to morphine will spend an inordinate amount of time and money trying to secure the drug. He or she is likely to visit the doctor frequently while complaining of all sorts of pain. Doctor shopping is also a common warning sign. Learning to recognise the symptoms and warning signs should make it easier to identify the family member struggling with morphine.

    How can I spot methadone addiction?

    It can be tough to spot a methadone addiction in yourself, particularly if you are using it for long-term maintenance of a different opioid addiction. In many cases, it is only when someone attempts to quit methadone that he or she realises that they are unable to.

    What is the goal of methadone addiction treatment?

    Overcoming a methadone addiction is the only way to get your life back on track if you have been affected. Treatment is designed to help you break both the physical and psychological addiction. During treatment, you will quit methadone and learn various methods to utilise on your return to normal life in an effort to avoid a relapse.

    How bad is methadone addiction?

    Like an addiction to any other substance, methadone addiction can be harmful to health and overall well-being. Long-term use of this drug can have many negative consequences for both your mental and physical health. However, it can also impact on your relationships and your prospects for the future.

    How to cure methadone addiction?

    Those who have developed an addiction to methadone might be interested in knowing how it can be cured; the reality though is that addiction is not a curable illness. Fortunately, it is possible to overcome methadone addiction, and with continued vigilance and maintenance, you can go on to live a permanent substance-free life.

    How to help someone who is addicted to methadone?

    If someone you love has been using methadone for medical or recreational purposes and you are worried that he or she has developed an addiction, it is important to take action as soon as possible. Addressing the issue with the individual in question might be something you are keen to avoid, but unless you do this, he or she is unlikely to get well.

    You should know that many are in denial or are not yet ready to give up the substance that they have learned to rely on. If you are interested in learning about how you can help someone who is addicted to methadone, you can speak to your doctor for advice. You can also talk to us here at UKAT.

    How do drug abuse and addiction develop?

    There are many reasons people abuse drugs. Some do so because they are looking for a way to escape reality due to issues in daily life or possibly past events that are painful to remember. Others do not intentionally abuse drugs – they are often taking prescription medication and develop a tolerance to it.

    An increased tolerance to drugs tends to occur irrespective of whether the substance is being used for recreational or medicinal purposes. Electing to increase the amount of the drug being taken may well help to achieve the desired effects, but it can also lead to a physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms. This often results in an addiction due to being caught in a cycle of drug abuse when trying to avoid unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    Teenage drug use can be easily missed in the early days as many of the symptoms associated with drug use, such a moodiness and isolation, can be a natural part of growing up. However, if you notice a sudden change in your teenager, it is important to be vigilant and to look for other signs. Physical symptoms that cannot be easily explained may indicate a drug problem, especially if coupled with sudden emotional and behavioural changes.

    Are heroin and methadone the same thing?

    Both heroin and methadone come from the same family of drugs, but they are not the same. Methadone is a prescription-only drug used in the treatment of opioid withdrawal and pain relief. Heroin is an illegal opioid with no medicinal benefits at all.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to methadone?

    If someone you love is using methadone and you are worried that he or she might have developed an addiction, there are certain signs to look out for. For example, he or she might become preoccupied with the drug and start neglecting spending time with family members and friends. You could also notice that he or she continues to use methadone even though it is having a negative impact on his or her health or other aspects of life.

    What does methadone treatment involve?

    Methadone treatment typically involves a programme of detoxification in the first instance. This is where the physical addiction is tackled, and the drug is withdrawn. Detox should ideally take place in a supervised facility as it will be safer and more comfortable in such a facility. After detox, rehabilitation is necessary to deal with the psychological addiction. Rehab usually involves a combination of behavioural and holistic therapies and medication, if appropriate.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    If you are worried that someone cares about has been abusing methadone, you will need to tackle the issue head-on. Although you may be hoping that you are wrong or that things will get better by themselves, the sooner you deal with the problem the better. Pick a time when your loved one will be more open to discussing the issue and stay calm while you express your concerns. Even if the affected person gets angry or denies the problem exists, you will have still planted a seed in his or her mind.

    If methadone abuse or addiction is indeed a problem, your loved one is more likely to come around to the idea eventually. If you do nothing, he or she will probably continue with the addictive behaviour for as long as possible.

    When to go to rehab for methadone addiction?

    Rehab is an essential part of methadone addiction treatment, so if you have developed this illness, you will need to consider it if you want to get better. Rehab usually takes place once detox has been completed. This is because your mind and body need to be free from drugs before you can tackle the emotional issues associated with the addiction.

    How does methadone withdrawal affect my health?

    During the detox process, you are likely to feel quite unwell and may feel as though you have the flu. However, these symptoms are unlikely to last and once you get through detox, you can look forward to many health benefits as your body restores normality.

    In a special detox clinic, you will be made more comfortable and medication might be used to help relieve any symptoms you do experience.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Whoever provides your care has a duty to keep your information private and confidential. If you are worried about others finding out that you are in treatment for addiction, you needn’t be. Staff at detox and rehab clinics are bound by strict confidentiality policies that prohibit the sharing of information with third parties. No one will know that you are in treatment for addiction unless you tell them.

    Am I addicted?

    When using a mood-altering substance such as methadone, it can be easy to allow things to spiral out of control without even realising. A clear sign is when a family member or friend raised concerns.

    Has your use of methadone changed?Are you taking more methadone than you did in the beginning? Have you begun using it with other substances to enhance the effects? Answering “yes” to any of these may be a sign of addiction.

    A good way to tell if you are addicted is to see how long you can go without methadone. If you have an addiction, this is unlikely to be very long. You might experience a compulsive need to use the drug. Please note, you should not do this until you have discussed it with your doctor.

    How serious is methadone detox?

    Although methadone detox does not carry the same risk of severe withdrawal symptoms as withdrawing from alcohol or benzodiazepines do, it can still be an unpleasant experience. For some people, the risk of problems is higher, particularly those with a history of mental or physical health problems.

    Can medications help me detox from methadone?

    In a special detox facility, medications may be administered to help you get through the process. Your care team might decide that a substitute opioid drug is appropriate to prevent the worst of the withdrawals. If so, a drug such as buprenorphine could be administered as the methadone is slowly withdrawn. Because buprenorphine also acts on the brain’s opioid receptors, it helps lessen the impact and gives your body a chance to get used to the withdrawal of the methadone.

    Can I die from methadone withdrawal?

    There is always the risk of complications during any drug withdrawal but in the case of methadone withdrawal, the risk of death is low, particularly if you complete the process under medical supervision in a dedicated detox clinic.

    How do I detox from methadone?

    If methadone is withdrawn slowly over the course of several days or weeks, the impact will be less severe. When quitting methadone before an addiction develops, you will be given a tapering schedule by your doctor. This will allow you to withdraw from the drug over the course of weeks or months. Using the “cold turkey” method is possible only under medical supervision.

    What happens during methadone rehab?

    When you begin a programme of methadone rehab, you will learn all about your illness and the reasons you began abusing methadone in the first place. Maybe you already know what led you down this particular path, or perhaps you have no idea how you ended up living a life of substance abuse.

    Rehab is a learning process – you will learn what triggers your addictive behaviour and how you can avoid a return to it in the future. You will learn how to live in recovery and to make the most of the opportunities that are presented to you.

    How long does methadone rehab last?

    It is common to wonder how long a programme of methadone rehab will last, but there are several factors to consider before this question can be answered. For most people having treatment in a residential clinic, rehab will last for between four and six weeks. However, this can be longer if the individual has more complex needs.

    For example, substance abuse and mental health disorders often go hand-in-hand. This is known as a dual diagnosis and requires a complex treatment programme as both conditions need to be treated at the same time. Similarly, if you have been abusing methadone with another substance, you may have more than one type of addiction, which will complicate your treatment somewhat.

    Methadone rehab: away from home or not?

    The location of your rehab clinic is something you will need to consider carefully. Most people look for the nearest clinic to where they live, whereas others are looking to get away from their familiar surroundings and prefer a clinic further afield.

    Where you have your treatment is all down to preference and convenience. If you would like your loved ones to be able to visit and take part in family therapy, a local clinic might be better. Nevertheless, if you want to stay anonymous, you may prefer a clinic in another city or a completely different part of the country.

    Why seek help for methadone addiction?

    Without treatment for your methadone addiction, your current situation will almost certainly deteriorate. Addiction does not go away without treatment, and even if you did manage to quit methadone on your own, the reasons you became addicted in the first place will still be present, threatening to send you back down the path of addiction again at a later date.

    If you have an addiction to methadone, seeking help will allow you to regain control of your life. When you are no longer in the grip of methadone abuse, your health will improve, and you can rebuild your relationships with family members, friends, and work colleagues. You can also look forward to the future, something that might have been alluding you thus far.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    Private rehab treatment is expensive and as such could be out of reach for some individuals. The good news is that here in the UK there are free options available too. The NHS provides treatment for those struggling with addiction and you can access your local drug treatment service by referring yourself or getting a referral from your doctor.

    You may also be able to access treatment for addiction through a local charity. You can find out more through online information databases.

    What factors into the cost of addiction treatment?

    How much you pay for addiction treatment will depend on how long you stay in the clinic and the provider in question. Some clinics have excellent records of success and can charge more for their services. How luxurious the clinic is, as well as specific facilities available, will also play a role. You can also expect, for example, to pay more for a private room than you would for a semi-private one.

    Am I addicted to methadone?

    If your loved ones have suggested you need help for addiction, they are likely to be right. Most family members or friends will not raise the issue of addiction unless they are sure they are right. But to know for sure, you should take a look at your own circumstances and how you are using methadone.

    Is your use interfering with everyday life? Do you continue to take it regardless? Have you experienced withdrawal symptoms when trying to stop using methadone? If you have answered yes to these questions, it might be worthwhile talking to someone about your situation. You can call us here at UKAT for a full assessment of your circumstances or consult your doctor for advice.

    Why do people start taking methadone?

    Methadone is a drug that is commonly used in the treatment of opioid addictions such as heroin addiction. However, because it has similar effects to heroin, some people abuse it for recreational purposes, believing it to be less harmful than heroin.

    There are also some individuals who take the drug as a way to escape from reality for a while. Painful memories from a past experience or the stress of daily life can often be enough to send people towards substance abuse.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    Addiction is characterised by a compulsive need to use a particular substance, even when knowing that in using it, negative consequences could arise. Those with an addiction will feel compelled to use drugs and will put it above everything else, including those they love and things they used to enjoy.

    What happens during fentanyl rehab?

    During fentanyl rehab, you will have both individual and group counselling sessions that will help you to learn more about your illness. You will be taught ways of coping with stressful life situations that do not involve mood-altering chemicals and you will also learn about the triggers to your addictive behaviour so that you can avoid them going forward.

    How long does fentanyl rehab last?

    Fentanyl rehab typically lasts for four weeks in an inpatient programme, but there are a number of factors that can influence the duration of a programme. For example, if you are being treated in an outpatient facility, your treatment programme could last for many months.

    When it comes to inpatient programmes, your response to treatment and your individual needs could mean you require a longer programme.

    Fentanyl rehab: away from home or not?

    With so many treatment providers across the UK, you can choose to be treated in a facility near to your home or one much farther afield. Before you make your decision though, it is important to weigh up personal preference with convenience.

    If your family members are keen to be involved in your recovery and if they are planning to take part in family therapy sessions, a clinic closer to home might be the best choice. This will allow them to visit and access these sessions when required.
    If, on the other hand, you are eager to keep your illness and recovery private, you might prefer a clinic in a different city or county where you can be sure that no one will know you.

    Why seek help for fentanyl addiction?

    Fentanyl treatment is important if you have developed an addiction. It may be easier for you to deny you have a problem or to hope that it will resolve itself, but this is unlikely to happen. In fact, your addiction is much more likely to get worse instead of better.

    Accessing help now could allow you to regain control of your life and help you say goodbye to fentanyl abuse once and for all. You will notice massive improvements in all areas of your life when it is no longer ruled by your need for drugs. Your mental and physical health will improve, as will your relationships with others. Furthermore, you can start to look forward to the future and the many opportunities that await.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    Not all addiction treatment involves a cost. For those who cannot afford to pay for inpatient treatment, there are free options available through the NHS and local charities. For more information on the free options available, you can access online information databases or speak to your doctor.

    What factors into the cost of addiction treatment?

    Where you have your treatment will determine the price of the programme. Some city clinics are more expensive than alternatives in rural locations. The reputation of the provider, the level of luxury of the clinic, and the duration of the programme will all also factor into the price.

    Am I addicted to fentanyl?

    Determining if you are addicted to fentanyl will help you to decide if you need treatment. It can be hard to distinguish between fentanyl abuse and fentanyl addiction if your mind is clouded by drugs. Nevertheless, if your use of fentanyl has begun to have a negative impact on your ability to live a normal life, it is likely that this is due to addiction.

    An addiction is a compelling need for a substance even when you know that using it will cause negative consequences. If you have tried to quit fentanyl and have been unable to, and if you are unable to meet your commitments or responsibilities because of your drug use, you probably have an addiction and are in need of help.

    Why do people start taking fentanyl?

    Some will start taking fentanyl for a legitimate medical reason, but others deliberately abuse it for recreational purposes. However, because many drug dealers have been lacing other drugs with fentanyl to maximise their profits, there are those who take the drug without even realising.

    Fentanyl is medically used as an anaesthetic or a painkiller, but because of its addictive nature, abuse is very common. Furthermore, many of those who do abuse the drug fail to appreciate the dangers involved. They believe that because fentanyl is a prescription medication, it is completely safe to take and therefore carries no risk.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    Addiction is an illness of the brain that causes an individual to be compelled to do something, even if that something is bad for them or will have negative consequences. If you are addicted to fentanyl, you are likely to be preoccupied with the drug and your thoughts will be consumed with it. You may find that you lose interest in those around you as well as in doing things that you used to enjoy.

    Your life will revolve around fentanyl and your need for it, and you may become isolated and withdrawn, preferring to spend time on your own than with the people you love. Your ability to enjoy everyday life will be severely hampered and even if you know the harm that taking fentanyl will cause, you will take it anyway because you will be unable to resist the compulsion to do so.

    How does fentanyl withdrawal affect my health?

    When you withdraw from a drug such as fentanyl you are likely to experience various withdrawal symptoms that could make you feel unwell. Symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea can make you feel uncomfortable, but they are unlikely to affect your overall health.

    You might also suffer symptoms of depression and anxiety, but the good news is that most of the symptoms you experience will subside over the course of one to two weeks. As you continue on your journey to permanent sobriety, your health should improve.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Your information will be kept confidential and secure at all times and nobody will know you are in treatment for addiction unless you want them to know. Staff at CQC-regulated clinics follow strict confidentiality policies and never share patient details with third parties without permission.

    Am I addicted?

    It is difficult to know if your use of a drug such as fentanyl has progressed from abuse to addiction, but there are certain things that can indicate when your use constitutes a problem. For example, if you have increased the amount of fentanyl that you are using in order to achieve a certain level of satisfaction, it is likely that this is because of an increased tolerance to the drug.

    Being tolerant to fentanyl, or even having a physical dependence, does not necessarily mean you have an addiction. However, if your use of the drug is having a negative impact on your life as well as the lives of those around you and you continue using it anyway, it is likely that you are addicted. If you have tried to quit but found that you could not, and if you have a compulsive need for the drug even though it causes harm, you need professional help to get better. It is important to speak to someone about your options for treatment.

    How serious is fentanyl detox?

    Fentanyl detox is rarely life-threatening in and of itself. However, strong cravings for the drug could cause you to return to it. What you should be aware of is that returning to previous levels of fentanyl after a period of abstinence can cause a fatal overdose.

    This is because tolerance to opioid drugs drops dramatically even with short periods of abstinence. If you take the same amount of the drug that you were taking before you quit, you will have a high risk of overdose.

    Can medications help me detox from fentanyl?

    The use of medications during fentanyl detox can help to make the process more comfortable. Opioid replacement therapy is regularly used during detox as it can help to maintain your tolerance for opioids and prevent the worst symptoms from occurring. This gives your body a chance to get used to the withdrawal of fentanyl without you feeling too uncomfortable.

    Can I die from fentanyl withdrawal?

    While fatal complications rarely occur during withdrawal from fentanyl, a fatal overdose is possible if you return to the drug shortly after a period of abstinence. As fentanyl detox can be unpleasant and uncomfortable, and because cravings for the drug commonly occur, many people will return to the drug at the same dosage as they were taking previously. This can cause a severe overdose with fatal consequences as tolerance for the drug will have decreased dramatically.

    How do I detox from fentanyl?

    The best way to detox from fentanyl is in a secure and managed facility with medical staff in attendance. How the process proceeds will be a matter for you and your care team to discuss. It may be the case that you withdraw from fentanyl suddenly, or alternatively, you might be weaned off the drug slowly.

    < p>Your detox provider could put you on an opioid replacement programme where you will take fentanyl or buprenorphine for a period while you withdraw from fentanyl. When you have successfully withdrawn from fentanyl, your dose of the replacement opioid can be tapered off until you are completely clean.

    How do drug abuse and addiction develop?

    Drug abuse often occurs as a result of increased tolerance. Those using prescription medications such as fentanyl may find that it becomes less effective after a while and so they increase their dose to get the relief they desire. This is drug abuse.

    The longer a drug is used, the higher the chance a physical dependence will occur. When it does, withdrawal symptoms are likely to manifest when trying to quit or cut back on your use of the substance. Most people realise very quickly that these symptoms subside when they take more drugs; it is this realisation that can cause a cycle of abuse, which in turn often progresses to addiction.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    If you are worried about your teenage son or daughter, look for physical signs such as confusion, pinpoint pupils, and slurred speech. If this is coupled with behavioural signs such as isolation, poor performance in school and a change in friends, it is probably best to seek advice from a doctor or other professional. You can talk to us here at UKAT for advice on how to handle this situation.

    Are heroin and fentanyl the same thing?

    Heroin and fentanyl are both part of the same family of drugs, but there are distinct differences between the two. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid while heroin is derived from morphine – a natural opioid. Fentanyl is also much more potent than heroin.

    Another significant difference between the two is the fact that fentanyl is a prescription drug used for the treatment of pain; heroin, on the other hand, is an illegal drug that has no accepted medical benefits.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to fentanyl?

    If you are worried about a loved one’s use of fentanyl and have noticed changes in his or her behaviour, it is important to assess the situation to determine if an addiction has developed. Addiction is characterised by a preoccupation with the drug and an overwhelming desire to use it, even when doing so will cause problems.

    What does fentanyl treatment involve?

    Treatment for fentanyl typically involves a programme of detoxification to break the cycle of abuse, which is followed by rehabilitation, where emotional and psychological issues are addressed. Treatment may mean a combination of medication, behavioural therapies, and holistic treatments for a more whole-person approach.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    If you believe that someone you love has developed an addiction, it is important to raise the issue as soon as possible. Find out all you can about fentanyl addiction and how it is treated before talking to your loved one.

    Pick a time when he or she will not be distracted or when there is a reason to leave. Explain why you are concerned and avoid being judgemental or critical. Instead, show your support and offer help. Even if the person gets angry and denies that the addiction exists, you will have planted a seed and given him or her something to reflect on. You might find that he or she comes back to you for help.

    When to go to rehab for fentanyl addiction?

    Admitting to having a problem with fentanyl can be difficult. However, if your use of the drug is affecting your ability to live a normal life, and if you continue to use it even though you know that it is going to cause problems, you need help. The sooner you sign up for a programme of detox and rehabilitation, the sooner you can get your life back on track.

    How can I spot fentanyl addiction?

    If you have noticed physical symptoms whenever you try to quit or cut down on the amount of fentanyl you are taking, it might be because you have become physically dependent on it. Nevertheless, if you have developed an addiction to fentanyl, you are likely to continue using it even if you know that it is likely to result in negative consequences.

    You will feel a compulsive need for the drug that will overtake everything else in your life, even affecting your ability to perform essential tasks. You might become preoccupied with fentanyl and you may lose interest in things that you used to enjoy. If this sounds familiar to you, it is important to seek help as soon as possible as you may need professional treatment to get better.

    What is the goal of fentanyl addiction treatment?

    When you enter a programme of detox and rehabilitation for a fentanyl addiction, the goal is to help you quit the drug completely and learn how to live without it going forward.
    Addiction is made up of a physical and a psychological element and both must be addressed if you are to fully overcome the illness.

    How bad is fentanyl addiction

    Fentanyl addiction is a serious illness of the brain that requires comprehensive treatment. Without treatment, the addiction will progress and cause severe consequences for not only your life but also the lives of those around you.

    Every time you take fentanyl, you are putting your life at risk. This is an immensely powerful drug that can easily result in overdose, particularly if you are buying fentanyl on the streets and are unaware of its potency. Fentanyl can also result in a fatal overdose if mixed with other substances. It is important to seek help immediately if you believe you have a fentanyl addiction.

    How to cure fentanyl addiction?

    Fentanyl addiction can be effectively treated via a programme of detox and rehabilitation. It should then be followed up with aftercare support and a commitment to ongoing maintenance. It is important to remember that while addiction can be effectively managed, it cannot be cured. Allowing yourself to become complacent after a period of sobriety could see you falling back down the slide to addiction.

    How to help someone who is addicted to fentanyl?

    If you believe that someone you know and care about has developed an addiction to fentanyl, it is important to speak out as soon as possible. Fear that you are mistaken might be holding you back, but if you have noticed signs of addiction, it is highly unlikely that you are wrong.

    If you know for certain that this person is using fentanyl and you have perceived a change in his or her behaviour, early intervention could prevent this individual’s life from spiralling completely out of control.

    What happens during Oxycontin rehab?

    Oxycontin rehab is a three-phase process that begins with detox. A typical detox treatment takes one to two weeks and is followed by several weeks of psychotherapeutic treatments. During this time, patients receive intense one-on-one and group counselling as well as any other appropriate treatments. Patients are discharged at the completion of their individual treatment plans.

    How long does Oxycontin rehab last?

    There is no set length of time that applies to every treatment. Oxycontin treatment lasts as long as necessary to successfully treat the patient. A typical detox-only treatment will generally last no more than a couple of weeks. When combined with rehab, treatment can last anywhere from 3 to 12 weeks. It may last longer in the most severe cases. Only a trained professional can determine an appropriate length of treatment for an Oxycontin patient.

    Oxycontin rehab: away from home or not?

    Whether or not the patient seeks Oxycontin treatment close to home is an individual decision. A big advantage of staying close to home is that family is nearby. This facilitates regular family visits as well as easier integration back into family life upon discharge. Having said that, some patients benefit from a greater distance between themselves and family. They benefit from the complete separation that going across the country affords.

    Why seek help for Oxycontin addiction?

    Oxycontin addiction is a serious problem that affects both the body and mind. It is not something most people can kick by themselves. We encourage Oxycontin abusers to seek help because professional treatment is usually the only way they can permanently stop using. Without professional help, addicts are at risk of a repeating cycle of quit attempts and relapse.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    Not being able to afford treatment does not exclude someone from getting help. The NHS offers free rehab services, and there are charities and support groups willing to do as much as they can within the resources at their disposal. Of course, addicts can try to quit on their own even though this is not advisable.

    What factors in the cost of addiction treatment?

    The cost of addiction treatment covers treatment facility use, medical equipment, prescription and OTC medications, staff salaries, food and lodging, facility maintenance, and overhead.

    Am I addicted to Oxycontin?

    You may be an Oxycontin addict if you display some or all the known warning signs and symptoms. The best way to know for sure is to get in touch with an experienced counsellor or medical professional capable of conducting a comprehensive evaluation. If you believe you might be addicted, do not wait. The sooner you get an evaluation, the better off you will be.

    Why do people start taking Oxycontin?

    Some Oxycontin users take the drug because they have been prescribed it by their doctors for pain. Among those prescription usurers, some begin abusing the drug by taking more than the doctor prescribed. Others start taking Oxycontin because it helps them cope with life. Still, others use the drug recreationally simply because they like the high it produces.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    The signs of addiction are many and varied. They include being unable to stop using, being willing to go to great lengths to get drugs, physical and psychological dependence, and more.

    How does Oxycontin withdrawal affect my health?

    In the short term, Oxycontin withdrawal will make you physically uncomfortable. It can jeopardise your health by way of accidental injuries and/or complications. Provided you complete withdrawal without experiencing any major health incidents, you can expect no long-lasting effects on your health as a result of withdrawal. You may still experience long-term effects as a result of the damage done by the Oxycontin itself.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Absolutely. Residential rehab clinics do not share personal or health information outside of the clinical setting. Only those who need access to your information to facilitate treatment will be afforded that opportunity. In addition, the fact that you are seeking treatment will also be kept confidential. Only those whom you choose to inform will know you are planning to attend a residential treatment programme.

    Am I addicted?

    You may be addicted if you have used Oxycontin for more than a few weeks. You can get a good idea of whether you are by taking a look at the signs and symptoms explained elsewhere on our website. To be sure though, you need a professional evaluation conducted by a trained doctor, nurse, or counsellor. A doctor is the most qualified to diagnose addiction and its severity.

    How serious is Oxycontin detox?

    Detoxing from Oxycontin is a very serious thing. There is always a risk of developing potentially life-threatening complications including respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, and Oxycontin withdrawal psychosis. The medical community considers detox and withdrawal a medical emergency requiring professional treatment.

    Adding to the seriousness is the reality that cravings can lead to relapse before detox is completed. A cycle of repeated quit attempts followed by relapse makes detox even more difficult with every subsequent quit attempt.

    Can medications help me detox from Oxycontin?

    Yes, they can. Rehab clinics use a variety of prescription and over-the-counter medications to stabilise patients, gradually tapering them from drug use, and control withdrawal symptoms. Medications are so helpful that it is hard to find a rehab clinic these days that doesn’t use them.

    Can I die from Oxycontin withdrawal?

    Yes, you can die from Oxycontin withdrawal. While deaths are rare in a medical setting, the risk is always present. Among the deaths that do occur during Oxycontin withdrawal, most are in some way related to respiratory or cardiac issues.

    How do I detox from Oxycontin?

    Some people attempt to self-detox by gradually reducing their dosage of Oxycontin. We do not recommend this due to the potential complications. If you must attempt it, enlist the help of family members or friends to stay with you throughout the entire process. Gradually taper your doses at manageable levels and find things to occupy your time during awake hours.

    Having said all that, the best way to detox from Oxycontin is by way of professional treatment. You can detox at an NHS hospital or through a privately-run residential clinic. In either case, your detox will be medically supervised and assisted for your safety.

    How do drug abuse and addiction develop?

    Drug abuse begins whenever a person uses Oxycontin outside of a doctor’s prescription. Untreated abuse often leads to tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    Teens who use and abuse drugs exhibit physical, psychological, and social warning signs. Parents can learn to spot drug problems in their children by learning what those warning signs are.

    Are heroin and Oxycontin the same thing?

    In a word, no. Both are opioids, but Oxycontin is a semi-synthetic drug where heroin is completely natural in its derivation.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to Oxycontin?

    You can get a good idea of whether a family member is addicted to Oxycontin by learning the warning signs and symptoms. Those signs and symptoms are physical, psychological, social, and behavioural.

    What does Oxycontin treatment involve?

    Oxycontin addiction is treated in a three-phase process that includes detox, rehabilitative therapies, and aftercare. Treatment is offered in inpatient settings.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    The most important thing you can do is learn the warning signs and symptoms of Oxycontin addiction. Should your loved one display those signs and symptoms, encourage him or her to seek medical treatment. You can research treatment options at the same time.

    When to go to rehab for Oxycontin addiction?

    Rehab is appropriate as soon as an Oxycontin addiction is recognised. The sooner the addict gets into a good rehab programme, the greater the chances of eventually achieving permanent abstinence.

    Can misuse of these OTC medicines lead to addiction?

    Misuse of any drug with psychoactive effects can lead to addiction because of how the brain reacts to it. In terms of Oxycontin, it is about how the drug encourages the production of endorphins like dopamine. The person whose brain derives intense pleasure from Oxycontin is a person who is more motivated to continue taking the drug. Over time, the continual cycle of using Oxycontin and enjoying the pleasurable feelings it produces can lead to addiction.

    How can these OTC medicine overdoses be treated?

    Overdose is generally treated in one of two ways. Where applicable, the first method is to reverse the effects of the drug in question. The other method is to introduce something like activated charcoal to prevent the body from absorbing any more of the drug.

    In addition, other prescription medications may be utilised to stabilise an overdosing patient. Finally, prescription medications and OTC drugs may be used to counteract overdose side effects as the primary drug begins to wear off.

    How can I spot Oxycontin addiction?

    A person using Oxycontin may begin displaying certain warning signs that indicate addiction. Some of those warning signs include unusual defensiveness, secretive behaviour, doctor shopping, and attempting to buy Oxycontin on the dark web.

    Your best bet is to research the signs of addiction and learn them. Once you know what to look for, it is easier to spot an addiction problem.

    What is the goal of Oxycontin addiction treatment?

    The primary goal of addiction treatment is to eventually reach a place where the former addict is drug-free. It is not to provide a permanent substitute for addiction simply by giving the addict another drug to take. As such, rehab clinics utilise a combination of treatments that get to the core physical and psychological aspects of addiction. Addressing them both offers the greatest chances of successfully reaching the overall goal of treatment.

    How bad is Oxycontin addiction?

    An addiction to any psychoactive substance can be devastating. Oxycontin certainly fits the bill. Oxycontin addiction leads to physical harm, psychological harm, and potential damage to relationships, finances, and nearly every other aspect of a person’s life. An untreated addiction can eventually lead to the addict’s untimely death.

    How can Oxycontin addiction be cured?

    We often say that the only real cure for addiction is abstinence. As such, an Oxycontin addict can only be cured when he or she makes the choice to never take the drug again. Some people can make the choice once and permanently stick with it. Others have to make the choice multiple times before they eventually stop using.

    Overcoming an Oxycontin addiction is a very individual thing. That’s why treatments in the modern era are individualised.

    How can I help someone who is addicted to Oxycontin?

    The first thing to know is that you cannot force an Oxycontin addict to get well. It is not even advisable to attempt to force that person into treatment. Rather, it’s best to offer as much support as you possibly can without enabling the addiction. Be a shoulder to cry on and a listening ear. Do some research on available treatment options, then encourage the addict to consider getting help. Finally, you can speak with a counsellor willing to help you conduct an intervention.

    Can misuse of these OTC medicines lead to addiction?

    Any OTC medicine with psychoactive effects is subject to abuse and addiction. This includes Vicodin, hydrocodone, and other opiates. The mind and body can become so dependent on the medication that it becomes impossible for the user to live without it. So yes, misuse of OTC medications can lead to addiction.

    How can these OTC medicine overdoses be treated?

    Overdosing on OTC medications can be treated at A & E through a variety of different means. More often than not, drugs are administered to either reverse the effects of the medication or prevent the body from absorbing any more of it. Sometimes it becomes necessary to induce vomiting. Finally, other medications may be used to counteract overdose symptoms like a respiratory and cardiac arrest.

    How can I spot Vicodin addiction?

    Spotting a Vicodin addiction requires knowing what signs to look for. Some of the more common signs are mood swings, an inability to concentrate, and bouts of dizziness and weakness. You can learn about all the warning signs of Vicodin addiction by researching the information here on our website. Note that there are both physical and psychological warning signs. Learn to recognise both.

    What is the goal of Vicodin addiction treatment?

    Doctors and therapists treat Vicodin addicts with the ultimate goal of helping them achieve a 100% drug-free state. Other potentially addictive drugs may be used along the way, but the goal is never to merely substitute one addiction with another. Vicodin treatment is intended to help the patient reach a state of abstinence, which is the only real ‘cure’ for addiction.

    How bad is Vicodin addiction?

    All addictions are bad in a general sense. To say that Vicodin addiction is more or less serious than an addiction to another drug is to discount the personal nature of addiction. Yes, Vicodin addiction is bad. It is bad enough to require professional medical help to beat it.

    How bad your addiction might be (if you abuse Vicodin) would be subject to a variety of factors. They include your medical history, how long you’ve been using, any other substances you use, and more.

    How can Vicodin addiction be cured?

    As previously stated, the only true cure for addiction is permanent abstinence. Vicodin addiction is no different. Treatments are focused around the dual goals of detoxifying the body and equipping patients to live the rest of their lives without Vicodin.

    A person who stops Vicodin use (without relapse) for a year or more is considered ‘cured’. However, that state only lasts as long as the person continues to maintain abstinence. To that end, support group participation and private counselling are indispensable tools for preventing relapse.

    How can I help someone who is addicted to Vicodin?

    The best way to help a Vicodin addict is to offer love and support without enabling the addiction. You can provide a listening ear and a shoulder to cry on. You can seek out treatment options and then explain those options to your friend or loved one. You can even work with a therapist to conduct an intervention. The one thing you cannot do is force a Vicodin addict into treatment. Forced treatment rarely succeeds. Sometimes it makes an addiction problem worse.

    How can I spot tramadol Addiction?

    If you are worried that you have developed an addiction to tramadol, there are certain signs to look out for. Addiction usually causes a preoccupation with the drug. You might spend your days thinking about it or talking about it and you may begin to revolve your life around your use of it.

    If you are addicted, you will likely lose control over your use, and even if you know that you are likely to experience negative consequences when you use it, you will be unable to resist. You might also experience withdrawal symptoms whenever you try to quit or reduce your consumption. .

    What is the goal of tramadol addiction treatment?

    When you enter a programme of detox and rehabilitation for a tramadol addiction, the aim will be to help you quit the drug and learn how to live without it. Through a combination of medication, behavioural therapies, and holistic treatments, you will have the opportunity to put substance abuse behind you once and for all.

    How bad is tramadol addiction?

    Tramadol addiction is like any other addiction in that it can cause problems in many aspects of your life. Continued use of this mood-altering chemical could affect both your mental and physical health while other aspects of life will also suffer, namely your relationships with family members, friends, and work colleagues.

    If you are spending more and more of your time under the influence of tramadol, you will have little time for anything else. Your ability to work may be impaired and this can affect your income levels. You might also be tempted to mix tramadol with other substances or purchase street versions of the drug, which could put your life in danger.

    How to cure tramadol addiction?

    It is possible to overcome tramadol addiction and to move on to a substance-free life. However, addiction is not a curable illness. With an effective treatment programme, you will learn what triggers your addictive behaviour so that you can avoid it in the future. With ongoing maintenance, there is no reason why you cannot live a healthier and happier, clean, and sober life.

    How to help someone who is addicted to tramadol?

    If someone you love has a tramadol addiction, you will probably want to do everything you can to help him or her overcome it. What you should be aware of is that your loved one might not be ready to accept help or even to admit that the problem exists.

    The best thing you can do is to tackle the subject head-on. Even if you are met with angry denials, you should not give up. By forcing your loved one to face the issue, you will be holding him or her to account.

    Many people hope that the problem will go away if they do nothing, or they will beat around the bush, hinting instead of tackling it. This only allows the addict to pretend as if everything is okay and gives them the opportunity to carry on with the addictive behaviour.

    If you would like information or advice on how to help a loved one with a tramadol addiction, you can speak to us here at UKAT. You can also get help from your doctor or your local support group.

    How do drug abuse and addiction develop?

    Drug abuse begins when a person starts using one or more substances in ways they were not intended to be used. For example, taking more Vicodin than a prescription calls for. When abuse is left unchecked, it can lead to tolerance, dependence, and eventual addiction.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    Teens with drug problems manifest certain symptoms and warning signs that give them away. Learn the symptoms and warning signs. If you observe them in your teen, seek help for the child right away.

    Are heroin and Vicodin the same thing?

    No. While there is an opiate component to both, heroin and Vicodin are distinctly different drugs.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to Vicodin?

    The Vicodin addict will exhibit a range of physical, mental, and social warning signs.

    What does Vicodin treatment involve?

    Treatment varies based on the seriousness of the problem at hand. The Vicodin abuser may be fine with a bit of counselling and support group involvement. An addict is likely to require a more comprehensive treatment that begins with detox, follows with psychotherapeutic treatments, and concludes with aftercare services.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    Again, look for the warning signs and symptoms you learned from this guide. If your observation indicates that a problem exists, talk with your loved one about it. Offer your support and help, including researching treatment options. Encourage your loved one to get medical help as soon as possible.

    When to go to rehab for Vicodin addiction?

    A Vicodin addiction is not something to fool around with. As soon as a person recognises he or she is addicted, arrangements for treatment should begin. The earliest possible treatment offers the best chances of permanent recovery.

    How do drug abuse and addiction develop?

    When it comes to prescription drugs such as tramadol, drug abuse usually begins when tolerance takes hold. Once the medication becomes less effective, you may believe that upping the dose is the best solution. Unfortunately, doing so without instructions from your doctor is classed as abuse.

    If you continue to increase your dose of tramadol each time it loses its effectiveness, you will significantly increase your risk of both physical dependence and addiction. Drug addiction usually occurs when a person gets caught in a cycle of abuse and withdrawal. It is signified by an overwhelming need to use the substance, despite knowing it will result in harm.

    How to know when your teen has a drug problem?

    If you suspect your teen is dabbling in drugs, it is vital to remain alert to the early warning signs. A change in friends and a drop in school grades could signify something is not quite right. Similarly, if you notice a sudden change in behaviours, such as an increased need for privacy or a loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed, it might mean that he or she has a problem.

    You should also look out for symptoms such as mood swings, fatigue, constricted or dilated pupils, loss of appetite, and disorientation. If you are worried, speak to your doctor for advice about what the next steps are. Alternatively, call us here at UKAT for information on how to approach your teen.

    Are heroin and Tramadol the same thing?

    As heroin and tramadol both belong to the same family of drugs, you might be forgiven for thinking they are the same thing, but they are not. While both stimulate the same areas of the brain, heroin is a much stronger substance than tramadol. Tramadol is a prescription drug designed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain and is available via a medical professional. Heroin is a street drug that has no accepted medical benefits.

    How can you know if a family member is addicted to Tramadol?

    If someone you love is using tramadol for pain relief, you need to be alert to the signs of abuse and addiction. Drug use can quickly progress to drug abuse and then addiction without the user being fully aware of what is happening.

    Drug abuse tends to occur when a drug such as tramadol becomes less effective over time. This can lead some individuals to abuse the drug by increasing their dose without consulting a doctor. Tramadol addiction occurs when the use of the drug starts to interfere with normal everyday living. If your loved one’s behaviour has changed, and his or her ability to meet responsibilities and commitments is diminished, it might be due to tramadol addiction. If the affected individual continues to use the drug even though it is having a negative impact on daily life, it is time to seek help.

    What does Tramadol treatment involve?

    Tramadol treatment involves a detox in the first instance, typically followed by a programme of rehabilitation. Both are necessary if full recovery is to be achieved. Detox will help you to quit tramadol and get through the withdrawal process. You can then get started on the rest of your recovery journey with rehab, which will help you to learn more about why you became addicted.

    Rehab treatment involves both individual and group counselling sessions as well as other recovery-based activities that will help to heal your mind, body and spirit as well as teach you how to live a substance-free life going forward.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    If you are worried about someone you care about and believe that he or she has developed an addiction to tramadol, it is vital that you act immediately. Hoping that the problem will go away and hence doing nothing is a normal response, but it will not help anyone. All it will do is allow your loved one to continue with his or her addictive behaviour unchecked.

    If you are worried, it is unlikely to be without reason. Speak to the person in a calm manner and express your concerns. Do not get angry, even if he or she does. Remember that the individual may not yet be ready to admit that the addiction exists. However, by raising your concerns, you are doing the right thing and forcing him or her to consider the possibility that his or her tramadol use is out of control.

    When to go to rehab for Tramadol addiction?

    Many addicts are confused about when to get help as they believe they must reach a certain point before rehab is necessary. The reality is that if you have an addiction to tramadol, treatment is necessary. You do not have to wait until you are in danger of losing everything you hold dear before you get treatment. In fact, the sooner you get help, the sooner you can get your life back under control. Early intervention greatly improves your chances of a full recovery.

    What happens during Vicodin rehab?

    A comprehensive Vicodin rehab programme begins with medically-assisted detox. After detox, the patient enters a psychotherapeutic programme that can last from 3 to 12 weeks. During this time, the patient receives a number of different therapies that are mostly counselling based. Counselling can occur both one-on-one and in a group setting. It is often accompanied by 12-step work of some sort.

    Following rehab is a selection of aftercare services designed to help the patient get through the next year without relapsing. Aftercare is like an extension of rehab but with less rigid expectations.

    How long does Vicodin rehab last?

    The length of time required to complete inpatient treatment varies from one patient to the next. The shortest residential treatment programmes involving both detox and psychotherapy can run for as little as three weeks. On the longer side, they can run up to 12 weeks. The length of time any patient spends in rehab really depends on how well the person responds to the treatments received.

    Please note that outpatient rehab may take considerably longer. How long, we cannot say. Again, it depends on how well the patient responds. There are also wait times and other factors to consider with the outpatient model.

    Vicodin rehab: away from home or not?

    It is not uncommon for patients to choose a Vicodin treatment facility close to home. This keeps family close by and facilitates visits every now and again. Local treatment also makes post-rehab reintegration a bit easier as well.

    On the other hand, there are patients who do much better by being completely separated from the local environment. They choose a rehab facility in another city, another county, or even the other side of the country. The separation helps them better concentrate on recovery without the distractions of the local life they are used to.

    Why seek help for Vicodin addiction?

    Some Vicodin users may think they are strong enough to beat addiction on their own, but rare is the person who can actually accomplish it. We recommend seeking help for Vicodin addiction because we know how difficult it is to conquer otherwise. Remember that addiction is not just about the choices you make; it is about how Vicodin is affecting your brain.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    There are treatments apart from private, residential rehab. One option is to avail yourself of the free services provided by the NHS. Another option is to arrange for private counselling and combine it with medical care provided by your GP. Finally, you could join a local support group while simultaneously trying to wean yourself from Vicodin. Be careful should you choose the last option.

    What factors in the cost of addiction treatment?

    Most of the cost of private addiction treatment is wrapped up in accommodations and amenities. But beyond that, the fees you pay to go to cover staff salaries, equipment, medications, utilities, facility overhead, and the cost of the treatments themselves.

    Am I addicted to Vicodin?

    If you exhibit any of the signs or symptoms of addiction explained elsewhere on our site, there is a good chance you are addicted to Vicodin. However, there is no way for you to know for sure on your own. You need to speak with an experienced professional capable of performing an objective evaluation. A doctor, therapist, or counsellor can give you the answer you need.

    Why do people start taking Vicodin?

    Some Vicodin abusers start taking the drug after a doctor prescribes it for pain management. Others might start using it after a friend or relative with a prescription gives them a pill or two. Still, others learn about the pleasurable effects of Vicodin and decide to start taking in order to cope with something that’s bothering them. There really is no single reason that applies to every user.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    Some of the more common signs of addiction include tolerance, dependence, drug cravings, and an inability to say no to the substance being used. Addicts also tend to be secretive about what they are doing. If addiction involves Vicodin, it is quite common for the addict to doctor shop or attempt to buy the drug on the street or online.

    What happens during tramadol rehab?

    During rehab, you will tackle the issues that caused your addiction. It will be important to identify the reason you found yourself in the grip of a tramadol addiction so that you do not suffer the same fate in the future. You will also learn about how to live a healthy and productive sober life going forward and the strategies that will help you to prevent a relapse.

    How long does tramadol rehab last?

    The length of your tramadol rehab programme will depend on several factors. If you are having rehab in an inpatient clinic, for example, the programme will be shorter than an outpatient programme. However, inpatient programme durations depend on how complex your needs are and how you respond to treatment. While some individuals manage to overcome their addiction in just four weeks, others take much longer.

    Tramadol rehab: away from home or not?

    There are a few things to consider when choosing a rehab clinic, but the one many people worry about is whether they should choose a clinic that is close to home or one that is in a different town, city, or county. There are pros and cons to both and your choice is really all about preference and convenience.

    If your family members are hoping to be able to visit you or get involved in your treatment, then a clinic closer to home is probably the best option. However, if you are more concerned about others not finding out about your addiction, a clinic further away may be a better idea.

    Why seek help for tramadol addiction?

    There are so many great reasons for accessing help for a tramadol addiction. You should know that this is an illness that is not going to go away on its own. Addiction is a progressive illness and it tends to worsen over time.

    Even if you have not noticed any major health issues thus far, you can be sure that over a prolonged period your tramadol use will begin to affect both your mental and physical wellbeing. Your ability to live a normal life will be negatively affected and your relationships will be placed under immense strain. If you want to regain control of your life, it is important to get help as soon as possible. The sooner you start your recovery journey, the sooner you can start to enjoy life again.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    If you are worried about the cost of private inpatient treatment, you should know that other options are available in the UK. Free programmes are provided by both the NHS and local charities and can be accessed by contacting your doctor or through self-referral. You can find information on the programmes available in your area through online information databases.

    What factors in the cost of addiction treatment?

    The price of inpatient addiction treatment will depend on the duration of the programme and things such as the facility and its amenities. If you are having treatment in a state-of-the-art clinic that has a swimming pool, sauna, gym, and private en-suite bedrooms, the price you pay is obviously going to be higher than it would be for a smaller clinic offering shared accommodation.

    You can also expect to pay more for more complex treatment. If you are being treated for more than one type of addiction, or an addiction coupled with a mental health programme, your treatment is likely to take longer and will, therefore, cost more.

    Am I addicted to tramadol?

    Determining if you have an addiction to tramadol can be difficult, but you can usually tell by your use of the drug and how much control you have over it. If your use of tramadol is taking over your life and making it hard for you to take care of your responsibilities at home or at work, you may have a problem.

    If your relationships are suffering and if you are compelled to use the medication despite its negative consequences, it is highly likely that you have an addiction.

    Why do people start taking tramadol?

    Tramadol is a prescription drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. Most people begin taking it after being prescribed the drug by a doctor for a painful condition. However, there are those who deliberately abuse tramadol for its sedative and euphoric properties. Those who abuse tramadol often do so to change the way that they feel. Some are dealing with a stressful everyday life, while others are trying to escape painful memories from a past traumatic event.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    It is important that you can spot the signs of addiction in yourself or a loved one. A physical dependence causes withdrawal symptoms when the drug is stopped or reduced. However, addiction is a compelling need to use a drug despite negative consequences.

    Addiction causes a preoccupation with the drug where you will spend most of your time talking about it or thinking about using it. It will affect your ability to live a normal life and you may lose any motivation to do things that you used to enjoy. You might stop spending time with loved ones and you may become moody and withdrawn.

    How does Vicodin withdrawal affect my health?

    Vicodin withdrawal can affect you in the short term by causing withdrawal symptoms you might find uncomfortable. As long as those withdrawal symptoms remain minimal and controlled, the likelihood of developing long-term health consequences is minimal as well.

    More serious withdrawal symptoms can affect your health more adversely. For example, you could have seizures that result in an injury-inducing fall. You could experience Vicodin withdrawal psychosis to such a degree that you harm yourself.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Vicodin addiction treatment is both confidential and private. Any health information compiled by your caregivers remain under the secure protection of the treatment facility. It is not shared outside of the facility except for future treatments. Staff members within the facility are only given access to the information on an as-needed basis.

    The same goes for your personal information. The rehab clinic you choose will not share your personal information with outside sources. They also will not inform others of your treatment without your consent. You and your information remain secure at all times.

    Am I addicted?

    This is a question our counsellors get asked all the time. Any concern on your part would suggest that you call and speak with one of our counsellors. In the meantime, you can also do further research on our site to learn about the signs and symptoms of addiction.

    How serious is Vicodin detox?

    Almost all detox scenarios are considered medical emergencies. In the case of Vicodin detox, its seriousness is found in the high risk of respiratory and cardiac arrest. Both conditions could be fatal. There is Vicodin withdrawal psychosis to worry about as well. The risks are serious enough to suggest that you should not attempt to withdraw from Vicodin on your own.

    Can medications help me detox from Vicodin?

    Absolutely. Rehab clinics use prescription medications to stabilise patients and then slowly taper them off Vicodin. Additional prescription and over-the-counter medications can help control withdrawal symptoms so that they are not so intense and uncomfortable.

    Can I die from Vicodin withdrawal?

    Although death rarely occurs during Vicodin withdrawal, it is always a possibility. The risk of dying during withdrawal is greater for people who attempt to do so without medical assistance. So again, seek out a medically-assisted detox programme if you need to withdraw from Vicodin.

    How do I detox from Vicodin?

    You can detox from Vicodin gradually or cold turkey. Residential rehab facilities almost always go the gradual route as it is safer and less intense. To do this, you would have to get in touch with a rehab centre in your area. They would enrol you in a treatment programme that includes medically-assisted detox and follow-up therapies.

    If you are insistent on attempting to detox alone, please do so gradually. Do not stop taking Vicodin all at once. Gradually reduce your dosage until you’re no longer using it. Along the way, enlist the help of family members and friends willing to stay with you until you are done.

    How does tramadol withdrawal affect my health?

    Withdrawal from tramadol can cause a range of symptoms that may make you feel unwell. You might find it difficult to sleep and you could suffer from muscle aches, nausea, and vomiting. The good news is that your symptoms will pass and your overall health and well-being will improve.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    It is natural to want your information kept private when you are being treated for addiction. This is an illness that is viewed in a negative light and you might be worried about what others will think if they discover you are affected.

    Whoever is providing your care has a duty to protect your privacy and to keep your information confidential. Staff at rehab clinics are bound by strict confidentiality policies and will never share your details with a third party without your permission.

    Am I addicted?

    The first sign of abuse is an increased tolerance; increasing your dose of tramadol to achieve a certain level of satisfaction or pain relief could be the start of a cycle of abuse. When you develop a physical dependence on tramadol, you will almost certainly notice withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit or whenever the effects of the drug wear off.

    Many people spiral down the path of addiction when they get caught in a cycle of abuse while trying to avoid withdrawal symptoms. A sign that you might be addicted to tramadol is an overwhelming need to use the drug even when knowing that there are likely to be negative consequences if you do.

    How serious is tramadol detox?

    Tramadol detox is rarely life-threatening, but it can leave you feeling miserable. It is important therefore to seek professional help or you may find that you return to the drug to avoid the symptoms.
    However, a return to tramadol use after a period of abstinence can lead to a fatal overdose because your tolerance to the substance will have decreased significantly.

    Can medications help me detox from tramadol?

    Many types of medication are used during tramadol detox. These include substitute opioid drugs such as methadone and buprenorphine, or an opioid blocker like naltrexone. Naltrexone stops opioid drugs such as tramadol from having an effect.
    Other medications can be used to ease the symptoms you do experience, like mood enhancers, and medications to stop vomiting and diarrhoea.

    Can I die from tramadol withdrawal?

    It is highly unlikely that fatal complications will arise during the detox process, but if you were to return to tramadol after a period of abstinence, you could suffer an overdose. Your tolerance levels will drop dramatically even with just a couple of days of abstinence, so taking the same dose as you were using before you began your detox could be much more than you can handle and hence potentially lead to dire consequences.

    How do I detox from tramadol?

    There are several ways to detox from tramadol. Your care team will advise on the most appropriate method for you. You might be advised to stop taking tramadol completely, or a tapering schedule may be recommended. Some providers prefer to use opioid replacement therapy, where you will be given a substitute opioid drug while you withdraw from tramadol.

    What are the causes & risk factors of opiate addiction?

    There is no single cause of opiate addiction. There are actually a number of risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing it. For example, a family history of addiction can dramatically increase the chances of becoming addicted to a mood-altering substance such as opioid medication.

    Mental health disorders can also increase the risk for addiction as many people will abuse mood-altering chemicals to help relieve symptoms associated with their condition, such as anxiety or depression.

    While opiates are considered safe to use over a short period of time, regular use can increase the risk of dependence and addiction. Moreover, if you abuse your medication, your risk will also increase. Taking more medication than advised to or mixing it with other sedative substances can dramatically increase the risk for addiction.

    What does morphine treatment involve?

    The goals of morphine addiction treatment are to break physical and psychological dependence, educate the patient as to how addiction works, develop strategies for preventing relapse, and then integrate back into society while utilising aftercare treatments to prevent relapse.

    What to do if you are concerned for a loved one?

    The first thing to do is step back and observe. See if any of the warning signs and symptoms you learned about in this guide are present. If they are, talk to your loved one and share your concerns. Should you receive a positive response, you can then help that person get the necessary medical help.

    Should you receive a negative response, you cannot push. Still, offer your full love and support. In the meantime, start researching treatment options. There may come a day when your loved one makes the decision to get help. You want to be ready should that happen.

    When should someone go to rehab for morphine addiction?

    The best time to make arrangements for rehab is the moment one recognises the existence of a morphine addiction. The sooner the addict gets into rehab, the greater the chances of full and complete recovery. Delaying rehab only delays recovery. It also makes things harder.

    What happens during morphine rehab?

    Morphine rehab at a residential treatment facility is both medically supervised and assisted. Patients are put through a gradual detox using substitute medications, then transitioned to psychotherapeutic treatments. Throughout a patient’s entire treatment term, trained medical and support staff are on hand to provide the necessary medical care.

    How long does morphine rehab last?

    There is no set schedule or timeline that dictates how every patient is treated. Treatment length depends on individual circumstances, including how well a given patient responds to treatment. The shortest residential treatment programmes run about three weeks; the longest programmes can run 12 weeks or longer. Aftercare generally goes on for one year following treatment discharge.

    Outpatient treatments lengths vary even more. A patient could be through in a matter of weeks if he or she responds well to gradual withdrawal. On the other hand, outpatient rehab may continue for months – or longer.

    Morphine rehab: away from home or not?

    Patients have the opportunity to seek out treatment close to home or at a distance. Your choice would depend on your needs and preferences. You may choose to stay close to home so that your family can visit. You might also choose to stay close to home so that you can avail yourself of outpatient treatment.

    On the other hand, you might prefer to travel to the other side of the county – or even across the country – just to get away from the distractions of the local area. Travelling away from home might provide you with some much-needed motivation to work hard at getting well.

    Some patients looking for luxury rehab even choose to travel overseas. They do so to maximise privacy and confidentiality. In the end, whether treatment is local, across the country, or overseas is really up to the individual.

    Why seek help for morphine addiction?

    Morphine addiction is an illness of the brain that will not go away by itself. It is also a progressive illness, at least to the extent that continuing to use morphine will continue to negatively affect the brain. The whole point of seeking help for morphine addiction is to stop the damage. Treatment helps you stop using morphine so that your body can heal itself. It equips you to avoid starting up with morphine again in the future.

    What other options exist for someone who cannot afford treatment?

    The NHS offers drug addiction treatment by way of outpatient clinics and independent counsellors. That is one place to start if you cannot afford private treatment. You could also join a local support group or contact a private counsellor and arrange for a few sessions that fit your budget.

    What factors into the cost of addiction treatment?

    Addiction treatment provided by private clinics varies in price. The level of luxury of the clinic, the reputation of the provider, and the length of the programme all play a role in how much you end up paying for treatment.
    You may find that a smaller, intimate clinic with more one-on-one care is dearer than a larger facility with high numbers of staff and can accommodate many more patients at one time.

    Am I addicted to morphine?

    The only way to know for sure if you are suffering from an addiction disorder is to be physically and mentally evaluated by a trained professional. You may be addicted if you have noticed that you have to constantly take more morphine to feel good. Addiction is a real possibility if you find that morphine plays a central role in most of what you do.

    Why do people start taking morphine?

    Many people who end up addicted to morphine begin taking it as a legitimate prescription to control pain. Morphine is often prescribed following surgery. It is prescribed to control the pain of cancer treatment or during recovery from a significant injury. Still, others are prescribed morphine to deal with the chronic pain of osteoarthritis.

    Outside of prescription use, people often take morphine to enjoy the euphoric feelings it produces. Morphine helps them escape the realities of life they otherwise have trouble coping with.

    What are the signs of addiction?
    Morphine addiction presents with many different signs and symptoms:

    • Compulsive use of morphine
    • Introversion and social isolation
    • A loss of interest in family relationships
    • A loss of interest in personal appearance
    • A loss of performance at work or school
    • The defensiveness of one’s drug use
    • A need to continue taking larger doses of the drug.
    How does morphine withdrawal affect my health?

    In the short-term, morphine withdrawal will create a set of symptoms that will make you extremely uncomfortable. Some of those symptoms can result in long-lasting effects on your physical and mental health. For example, the shallow breathing associated with morphine withdrawal could lead to hypoxia and eventual brain damage. As long as morphine withdrawal is conducted in a medically supervised setting though, your risk of experiencing a long-term negative impact on your health is minimal.

    Will my information be kept confidential?

    Medically supervised treatments in the UK are kept confidential. Your medical information will be shared only among those clinicians and support staff who have a medically necessary reason to utilise it. No one outside the treatment clinic will know about your treatment unless you choose to inform them. As for any personal information collected for the purposes of treating you, it is kept safe and secure at all times.

    Am I addicted?

    You may be addicted to morphine if you demonstrate tolerance, physical dependence, and the compulsive desire to use the drug. If you use morphine without any regard to the damage it is causing, that is another sign of addiction. Unfortunately, an addiction cannot be diagnosed through a guide like this. You need a medical and psychological evaluation conducted by an experienced professional.

    How serious is morphine detox?

    Detoxing from any drug is considered a serious medical scenario. Morphine detox is especially serious because of the very real risk of hypoxia. Detoxing from morphine also carries with it the risk of a condition known as morphine withdrawal psychosis. This is a very serious condition that could lead to significant injury or death.

    Can medications help me detox from morphine?

    Yes, there are a number of medications treatment centres can use to help facilitate a gradual and less risky detox. Two of those drugs are opioid substitutes while a third is a completely different form of analgesic that is not even a controlled substance. In addition, there are both prescription and over-the-counter medications that can be administered to treat withdrawal symptoms.

    Can I die from morphine withdrawal?

    Although death is rare for morphine withdrawal, it is certainly not out of the question. Respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, and morphine withdrawal psychosis can all lead to critical medical conditions that eventually result in death. For this reason, it is never advised that a person attempting to withdraw from morphine do so outside of the supervision of medical professionals.

    How do I detox from morphine?

    The safest and most comfortable way to detox from morphine is through the tapering (i.e., gradual) method. This method utilises either lower doses of morphine or another substitute drug to gradually bring you through withdrawal. The goal is to continue tapering the amount of medication you receive until you are eventually drug-free.

    Is cocaine addiction physical or psychological?

    Addiction to mood-altering drugs usually involves both physical and psychological dependence. With some drugs, the addiction can be more of a physical problem, but in the case of cocaine, the psychological issues are the biggest concern. Having said that, those who abuse cocaine will usually experience both physical and psychological symptoms when they try to quit.

    Is cocaine addiction hard to beat?

    Cocaine addiction is notoriously difficult to beat, but not impossible. The intense cravings for the drug can often be a huge barrier to recovery as many affected individuals find it hard to resist the pull of the drug. To have the best chance of a long-term successful recovery, it is important to engage in a good programme of detoxification and rehabilitation with support from fully-trained individuals. By committing to a programme and making necessary changes, you can overcome your addiction once and for all.

    How is cocaine addiction treated?

    Cocaine addiction is treated with a detox and rehabilitation programme. Detox will help to break the cycle of drug abuse while rehabilitation deals with the underlying emotional and psychological issues that may have caused the illness in the first place.
    Through behavioural therapies, you can learn how to quit cocaine for good and develop new healthier strategies for dealing with life situations going forward.

    What medications are used for cocaine addiction?

    There are no medications approved for use in the treatment of cocaine withdrawal and addiction, but there are many that are currently being trialled for their efficacy. During treatment for cocaine addiction, medications that could help to curb cravings and reduce symptoms associated with withdrawal such as depression and anxiety may be used.

    How does cocaine addiction start?

    Cocaine addiction starts with abuse of the drug. As cocaine is a Class A illegal drug here in the UK, any use of it is classed as abuse. However, not everyone who uses the drug will develop an addiction. Those who do tend to start by increasing their use of the substance when they develop a tolerance to it.
    With frequent use, you will need to increase the dose to achieve the desired level of satisfaction. If this trend continues, you are likely to develop both a physical and psychological dependence, which will increase the chances of you becoming addicted.

    How can you overcome a cocaine addiction?

    The best way to overcome cocaine addiction is to commit to a programme of recovery. Think about the reasons you want to quit the drug and seek help from your doctor. There are many options for treatment in the UK, including NHS-run programmes and those provided by charity organisations and private clinics.
    Committing to a programme of recovery means deciding to quit cocaine and doing everything required to achieve full sobriety. You will need to complete a programme of detoxification and rehabilitation to get your life back on track. With a good programme of care and support, you can say goodbye to cocaine abuse for good.

    How bad is cocaine addiction?

    Just like with any other addiction to a mood-altering drug, a cocaine addiction can have negative consequences for many aspects of your life. Without treatment, your mental and physical health will be affected and your ability to live a normal life will be impaired.
    You should also be aware that you risk an overdose every time you take the drug because there is no way to tell how pure it is just by looking at it. It is important, therefore, that you seek help for your addiction as soon as possible.

    Can cocaine addiction kill you?

    Because there is a risk of overdose with cocaine abuse, your addiction could result in fatal consequences. You can also run the risk of developing life-threatening conditions such as heart, liver, and kidney damage if you continue to abuse the drug.

    Can you recover from cocaine addiction?

    While cocaine addiction might be difficult to beat, it is not impossible. Provided you are ready to get better and are prepared to make the necessary lifestyle changes, you can achieve a full recovery from a cocaine addiction.

    What is crack cocaine addiction like?

    Crack cocaine addiction is characterised by compulsively seeking and using the drug in increasingly higher doses. Addicts will typically exhibit the following symptoms:
    • Difficulty controlling usage
    • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you don’t use crack (or take a smaller dose)
    • Spending more time and/or money trying to acquire crack cocaine
    • Experiencing cravings for crack cocaine
    • Continued use of crack, despite experiencing health issues
    • Development of risky behaviours, such as using crack whilst driving
    • Neglecting personal hygiene and physical appearance
    • Loss of interest in personal and professional responsibilities

    How Can Crack Cocaine Affect Appearance

    Severe crack cocaine use typically results in undernourishment, with individuals paying little attention to personal hygiene. Typically, yellow teeth, tooth decay and burnt lips result from frequent crack cocaine use.

    Why is crack cocaine highly addictive?

    This drug is highly addictive because of its intense, but short-lived pleasurable effects, which drive an abuser to use it repeatedly over a short period of time. The drug’s powerful effect on the brain’s dopamine regulation also contributes to its addictiveness.

    Is there such a thing as an addictive personality?

    There is such a thing as an addictive personality, as there are certain individuals who are more likely to become addicted to crack cocaine, such as those with a pre-existing mental disorder.

    Where else can I find help?

    You should never try to beat a crack addiction on your own, as this can be dangerous. Instead, seek help in a private rehab facility or try to access addiction treatment via the NHS.

    How does crack cocaine addiction start?

    The first and most crucial sign of crack addiction is an increased tolerance to the drug. Using crack in any amount is dangerous, but if you find yourself needing higher and higher doses of the drug to achieve the desired effects, this means you’re one step closer to becoming an addict.

    How can I help someone who is addicted to crack cocaine?

    If you want to help a loved one overcome a crack cocaine addiction, you need to first of all stop enabling their habit. Next, you’ll need to convince them to seek professional help by staging an intervention.

    What causes crack cocaine addiction?

    The cause of crack cocaine addiction can be traced to your system adapting to the influence of the drug on your mind and body – especially in terms of your body’s production of dopamine. Continued use of the drug will result in your body depending on crack to produce high amounts of dopamine, which your body will not be able to achieve when you quit using the drug. In the absence of crack cocaine in your system, dopamine levels will drop and you will begin to experience withdrawal symptoms.

    How is ecstasy bad for you?

    The use of ecstasy carries the risk of various negative side effects, both physical and psychological. These effects range in severity from mild headaches to complications that could result in death. Frequent use of ecstasy can lead you to become dependent on the drug, which leads to withdrawal symptoms when you attempt to quit. In addition, the build-up of neurotransmitters due to the frequent use of the drug can lead to nerve and brain damage.

    How is ecstasy different from molly?

    Molly is a term used to describe the unadulterated form of MDMA. Molly is often sold as a powder in capsules, while ecstasy is sold in tablet form. While Molly is still considered cheap to obtain, it is often sold at a higher price. Drug tests have shown that many of the products sold as Molly are actually mixed with other chemicals, with a low estimate of 13% being actual unadulterated MDMA.

    Is ecstasy linked to schizophrenia?

    Psychosis, one of the symptoms of ecstasy abuse, is often confused with schizophrenia. There are no studies so far that show any links between ecstasy abuse and the development of schizophrenia. Some have reported that ecstasy helps them cope with symptoms of schizophrenia; this has not been proven by scientific research. Thus, those with mental disorders, including schizophrenia, are strongly advised not to consume ecstasy in any form.

    Is ecstasy illegal?

    Ecstasy is illegal in the UK. It is classified as a Class A drug alongside heroin, cocaine, methadone, meth, mushrooms, and LSD. Class A drugs are considered highly dangerous. If you are caught in possession of ecstasy, you may face up to 7 years in prison plus a fine. A supply charge carries a maximum sentence of life imprisonment plus a fine.

    Does ecstasy cause hallucinations?

    Ecstasy has been shown to cause hallucinations. Not everyone who abuses the drug will experience hallucinations, and those who do may not experience full hallucinatory trips. Most users report some visual hallucinations. Factors such as dosage, type of ecstasy, impurities, and your own physiology contribute to whether or not you experience hallucinatory effects.

    How do antibiotics affect ecstasy?

    Antibiotics do not react chemically with ecstasy. However, most of the pills sold as ecstasy are more likely to be laced with other chemicals, such as cocaine, which does react with antibiotics. You are most likely taking antibiotics to cure an illness and as such, it is important for you to focus on recovering completely from your illness and avoid illicit drugs in the process.

    A friend is abusing ecstasy. How can i help them?

    If your friend has reached out to you for help, it is important that you provide as much support as you can give. You can assist in making appointments with health professionals, researching treatment facilities (for cases of dependence or addiction), accompanying them to their appointments if need be, and providing a positive environment for them. If your friend is resistant to help, you can try to convince them to seek a professional opinion. You can also gather information on ecstasy abuse and leave it for your friend to go through.

    Why is heroin addiction hard to beat?

    Heroin is an extremely addictive substance, both physically and psychologically. The body becomes dependent upon heroin in order to function “normally”, while psychologically the user becomes almost entirely focused on the acquisition and consumption of the drug and loses sight of everything else which previously made life enjoyable. Stopping taking the drug usually results in very unpleasant withdrawal symptoms which many users are terrified of undergoing.

    Can heroin addiction be cured?

    Yes, it is possible to live a happy, successful life after a heroin addiction. Treatment – possibly at a residential rehab – usually involves a combination of detoxification and therapy, and the latter may need to be sustained for a long time (possibly alongside attendance at support groups) if the addict is to avoid relapsing; however, with dedication and perseverance even the most deeply entrenched heroin addiction can be beaten and the user can go on to have a wonderful, drug-free life.

    Can heroin abuse cause diabetes?

    Some research implies that regular consumption of heroin can have an impact upon the pancreas which can cause hyperglycaemia; more studies are underway in order to establish the nature of this relationship.

    Can heroin abuse cause brain damage?

    Yes: long-term heroin use can cause neurological damage, while overdose can result in significant brain damage amongst survivors if they are starved of oxygen for protracted periods.

    How has heroin abuse become an epidemic?

    Heroin’s ready availability and comparative affordability mean that it tempts users all over the UK, many of whom become addicted.

    Why is heroin abuse rising?

    Heroin abuse is often associated with financial deprivation, and in the wake of the financial crisis many parts of Britain are significantly underperforming economically. At the same time, as a result of various conflicts in the Middle East and Central Asia (especially the war in Afghanistan, where much of the world’s opium is produced) there is now much more heroin available on the market than was the case even a decade or so ago. The result is a “perfect storm” of poverty and addiction which is ruining countless lives.

    What causes addiction?

    There is a multitude of reasons why you could become addicted to drugs. Scientists have narrowed it down to a combination of risk factors such as having a parent who abused drugs, living in an area where drug use is normal, mental health issues, peer pressure and family problems such as divorce.

    How can addiction affect you?

    The impact of addiction depends on the substance in question and the way in which it was consumed. Cannabis addiction is not physical, but affects your mind, altering your perception of reality, affecting your ability to learn or remember things, as well as inducing hallucinations and even psychosis in some situations.

    Is cannabis truly addictive?

    While some people believe that cannabis isn’t addictive, the truth is that you could develop a psychological dependence if you take it over a long period of time. It is officially diagnosed as a substance use disorder in the DSM-V.

    At what point does cannabis use require intervention?

    If cannabis affects your relationships, leads to health-related problems or makes it impossible for you to meet the major responsibilities in your life, you’ll need to seek treatment for addiction.

    What does a cannabis addiction programme look like?

    Cannabis addiction clinics in the UK usually feature a rehab centre, where you can safely wean yourself off the drug. There are medical professionals on site all day and night to supervise you. Meals are freshly prepared by a chef, while you’ll be expected to follow a schedule that guides daily activities in the rehab centre, as well as take part in certain recovery programmes.

    What are the effects of cannabis on perception and thinking?

    Long-term cannabis abuse affects your ability to complete memory-related tasks and decreases your motivation for daily activities. It also intensifies schizophrenia and could lead to psychosis – especially given the potency what’s currently available on the streets.

    Is there any advice for the family?

    The first thing to do if you suspect your loved one is abusing cannabis is to educate yourself about the signs and symptoms of the addiction. If they exhibit any of these symptoms, encourage them to get help, but do not feed their drug habit in any way. Detach yourself from the addict’s behaviour, but let them know that you’re there for them whenever they need you. If they refuse to get help after a while, you might have to hire a professional interventionist to help.

    Can PTSD and ecstasy addiction be treated simultaneously?

    In certain cases, there are mental disorders that may be occurring alongside addiction to ecstasy. Cases such as PTSD can cause you to use ecstasy to ease your suffering. However, ecstasy isn’t an ideal remedy for this condition and will end up worsening your episodes, especially when withdrawal sets in. This case is known as a dual diagnosis and there are expert therapists that can treat both issues simultaneously to ensure you recover properly.

    How to know if someone I know is using ecstasy?

    Addiction to ecstasy come with different signs that show a person is abusing the drug compulsively. While these signs can be different from person to person, you can identify an ecstasy addiction in someone close to you if you know what to look for. Some signs of abuse and addiction include an abnormally heightened sensation of pleasure when touched; unusually long periods without sleep; change in social circles and excessive partying; decreased sensation of pain; not meeting appointments; and financial and legal problems.

    Who should I call if I am afraid I will relapse?

    The recovery journey is fraught with challenges and temptations that may mean you find it difficult to maintain your sobriety. This is why you need to surround yourself with a support network that will keep you on your feet when you’re vulnerable. Members of your family and close friends who have been supporting you to get sober can be a first port of call whenever you feel like using again. You can also contact members of your support group (it’s important that you join one) as they can also be of tremendous help during this time. Also, you can contact your therapist to guide you through this phase.

    Are there any risks regarding rehab?

    Rehab is safe to go through compared to self-medicating at home. However, there can be risks of going through an outpatient programme as you’ll likely be faced with relapse triggers because you’ll be in your usual environment, which isn’t trigger-free, unlike an inpatient programme.

    Can I heal depression with ecstasy?

    While ecstasy can reduce the effects and symptoms of depression for a short period, it can worsen your condition in the long run. There are no approved medical uses for ecstasy and it is never recommended to use the drug as a palliative measure for your depression. You should consult a doctor or psychologist if you’re suffering from depression.

    Why is ecstasy so addictive?

    Ecstasy’s addictive nature stems from the way it interacts with the brain. The drug triggers a release of certain neurochemicals that are responsible for mood regulation, pleasure, euphoria, pain, and sleep. This explains why you get the rush of energy and excitement whenever you take the drug, causing you to use repeated doses to induce these unnatural feelings over and over.

    How long is rehab?

    The ideal duration of rehab varies from person to person. The amount of time you’ll spend receiving treatment will depend on a lot of factors surrounding your addiction, as well as your personal preference. If your addiction to ecstasy is chronic, it’ll be recommended that you stay in rehab for as long as possible. While the 28-day duration is the common length, research has found that staying up to 90 days in rehab will yield the best result.

    What happens during rehab?

    During rehab, you will probably be required to undergo detox in order to flush out the remaining toxins from your system. This is usually followed by therapy and other methods of treatment, aimed at helping you achieve recovery.

    How long does rehab take?

    The length of rehab depends on several factors, including how long you’ve used heroin and how much of the substance is in your system.

    What factors affect the cost of heroin rehab?
    The cost of heroin rehab usually depends on the location of the facility, length of treatment, amenities provided and type of treatments provided, amongst other factors. You can read more on the cost of rehab in our guide and getting in touch with our friendly admission team.
    Do I need rehab?

    Rehab is almost always necessary when you’re struggling with long-term abuse and addiction to heroin and other mind-altering substances.

    What are the signs of addiction?

    The most common signs of addiction include anxiety, irritability, depression, cravings and loss of self-control.

    What causes addiction?

    The main causes of addiction are unknown, but how your body reacts to the presence of certain addictive substances can eventually lead to addiction.

    Am I addicted?

    If you regularly use drugs and have difficulty staying away from them for a period of time, you could be addicted.

    How do I know when someone needs help?

    Your loved one may need help if they’re showing different warning signs of addiction or if you find drug apparatus in their possession.

    What are the benefits of private rehab?

    Some of the major benefits of private rehab include same day intake, rapid access to support when you need it, privacy from the public, personalised treatment plan, peer support, training and education, relapse prevention and aftercare support.

    How can I find treatment for crack cocaine addiction in my area?

    The easiest way to find a rehab centre in your area is to call an addiction helpline and a counsellor will guide you to the nearest crack addiction centre that caters to your needs.

    How long does rehab last for crack cocaine addiction?

    There is no defined time frame for rehab, although the recommended length is two to three months. Crack is a powerful substance and it’s easy to become addicted. Depending on the severity of your addiction, likely presence of a co-occurring disorder and any medical conditions, your doctor might recommend a 90 day stay for comprehensive treatment.

    Will I get any counselling after rehab?

    Yes. When you undergo treatment at a private rehab centre in the UK, this doesn’t end after your residential stay is over. You will receive follow-up care that includes individual counselling, group counselling, 12-step programmes, peer support and Cocaine Anonymous support group meetings.

    What’s the difference between crack cocaine and cocaine?

    Physically, they both differ in appearance, as cocaine comes in powder form, while crack resembles a rock – usually coloured light brown, white or cream. Cocaine is snorted, while crack is lit up and smoked through a pipe or melted and injected directly into the bloodstream. The intensity of the ‘high’ you feel when you take crack is more than the powder form and it takes a longer time for the effects of the drug to wear off.

    What are the signs that you’re addicted to crack cocaine?

    Physical signs of crack cocaine addiction include nosebleeds, insomnia, dilated pupils, weight loss and twitching. Psychological signs include volatile mood swings, prioritising crack above everything else in your life, persistent thoughts about smoking crack, paranoia and an inability to quit.

    How much does crack cocaine rehab cost?
    The cost of rehab treatment depends on the duration of your stay, the location of the rehab centre, the severity of your addiction and the presence of any co-occurring disorders. Standard rehab centres in the UK usually charge between £1,300 to £1,500 per week for treatment and up to £8,000 per month. Meanwhile, executive and luxury rehab centres charge up to £15,000 per week for crack cocaine addiction treatment.
    How quickly does cannabis leave the body?

    The body metabolises cannabis rapidly, but traces of metabolites can linger. The amount of time it takes to break down cannabis products (and other active ingredients) depends on the amount consumed and how often the user does so. Though you might experience the effects of cannabis for a while longer, any traces can be detected via the appropriate tests. Certain THC metabolites can be found in the body after 20 hours, though some can be stored in body fat for as long as 13 days.

    How long will cannabis show up on drug tests?

    Blood tests can sometimes be unreliable for detecting the presence of cannabis in the body because the substance leaves the bloodstream very quickly. Most experts have found that cannabis can be detected after 13 days of consumption via a urine test. However, urine tests can only show how recently someone has used the drug, rather than the level of intoxication (unlike blood tests).

    Why is detoxing at home potentially harmful?

    Undergoing medical detox without the guidance of an addiction expert can be harmful, due to the accompanying withdrawal symptoms. In cases where you’ve abused cannabis alongside other substances such as tobacco, cocaine, alcohol and other harmful drugs, health complications could arise that require professional help to tackle. Therefore, always ensure you check in with a medical expert whenever you want to undergo detox.

    Are there any cannabis detox methods that don’t work?

    There is a lot of information circulating about detox ‘shortcuts’ for cannabis, which bear promises that can evict every trace of THC from your system in a very short amount of time. These methods are mere hoaxes and will leave you disappointed if pinning all your hopes on them. They include:
    Excessive water consumption: consuming large amounts of water days prior to your drug test will do you little good, as water doesn’t have any effect on the accumulated THC in fat cells.
    Cranberry Juice: being a diuretic, cranberry juice only makes you urinate more, without having any effect on cannabis residues in your body.
    Vinegar: this can only help in the long-term, but isn’t a quick fix by any means. Taking vinegar over a long period of time is also risky, as it comes with a number of health issues.
    Niacin detox: it’s possible for Niacin to work as a detox measure, but it isn’t a quick miracle solution as it’s sometimes touted to be. It could work for 10 days or more; however, there are many contributing factors that are complex to pinpoint.

    Is detoxing from cannabis dangerous?

    Detox can be dangerous if you attempt it on your own and if you have a chronic case of addiction. Abusing other harmful substances alongside cannabis can also put you at risk if you don’t have expert help.

    How long does cannabis stay in your system?

    The amount of time cannabis stays in your system after consumption depends on how much of the substance you’ve consumed and how long you’ve been ingesting or smoking it. Cannabis is known to be present in the bloodstream for just a short period but can stay in fat cells for 13 days, where it can be detected by a urine test.

    Can you outrun addiction?

    Exercising can help during your recovery process – especially if you can run and subsequently burn some fat. Experts also recommend exercising during detox, particularly when you’re doing so on an outpatient basis.

    What causes heroin addiction?

    Heroin addiction usually stems from abuse of the drug. Those who abuse it have assorted reasons for doing so, such as forgetting about painful memories, peer pressure, for recreational purposes, or just out of curiosity.
    Nonetheless, not everyone who abuses heroin will go on to develop an addiction. Those who do often have a number of risk factors for the illness, such as a family history of addiction, unresolved traumatic experiences, environmental influences, a history of mental health problems, or early exposure to the drug.

    Addiction usually develops when a person builds up a tolerance to heroin and then continues to abuse it but in higher doses. This often results in a dependence on the drug, which can be quickly followed by addiction.

    Is heroin withdrawal dangerous?

    Heroin withdrawal can lead to dangerous complications including seizures and convulsions if not managed effectively. Because symptoms such as diarrhoea and vomiting can result in dehydration, it is important to stay hydrated throughout.

    The best place to detox in terms of ensuring comfort and safety is in a detox facility under the supervision of trained medical professionals.

    What detox programme is right for me?

    Your personal circumstances will determine which type of detox is right for you. You have the option of detoxing in an inpatient clinic or at home with regular visits to an outpatient facility. If you have a severe addiction, it may be wise to detox in an inpatient facility. You are likely to experience strong cravings for heroin during withdrawal so being in a secure facility where there are no temptations might help prevent a return to drug use, which could prolong your withdrawal or result in an accidental overdose.

    Can heroin withdrawal kill you?

    Death during heroin withdrawal is rare but there is the risk of complications, so it is important that you are carefully monitored at all times. It is also important to remember that your tolerance levels will drop quite dramatically when you quit heroin. Should you return to the drug during detox after a period of abstinence, you will risk an accidental overdose that could have fatal consequences.

    What does heroin withdrawal feel like?

    Most people who experience heroin withdrawal will liken it to having the flu. If you experience the gamut of possible symptoms, you are likely to have a low-grade fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, muscle aches, and chills.

    The worst of the symptoms will occur during the first two to three days when they will peak and begin to subside. During that time, you will likely feel very unwell and you may experience strong cravings for heroin. The good news is that there are medications and psychological interventions that can help to relieve the symptoms.

    How can you ease heroin withdrawal?

    The symptoms associated with heroin withdrawal are very unpleasant and can cause you to feel very unwell. However, with over-the-counter medications and psychological interventions such as meditation and mindfulness, any discomfort you are experiencing can be eased.

    How long does a withdrawal from ecstasy last?

    Withdrawal symptoms are different for everyone, but usually, peak within one to four days after your last dose and last for seven to ten days. However, post-acute symptoms such as cravings, insomnia and depression might linger for up to a few months after withdrawal.

    How can I manage withdrawal at home?

    There is no definitive way to manage Ecstasy withdrawal from home. Withdrawal symptoms are unpredictable and could prove fatal if a medical emergency occurs without immediate access to treatment. So, remain safe by enrolling in a medical programme, where you’ll be surrounded by healthcare professionals.

    Can I take Xanax whilst withdrawing from ecstasy?

    The only medications you should take when withdrawing from Ecstasy are those prescribed by your doctor, psychiatrist or medical professional.

    Is there an ecstasy withdrawal kit I can buy?

    Specific detox kits for ecstasy are unavailable at present; however, there are some drug detox kits available, whose prices vary. They are ineffective, unsafe and impersonal though. For instance, they don’t consider your personal needs, take into account any co-occurring disorders or provide medical care in case of complications.

    What can I eat whilst withdrawing from ecstasy?

    At a rehab centre, the nutritional deficiencies from your specific addiction will be taken into consideration. To get back on track, you should eat balanced meals that include Omega-3, fish, eggs, dairy products and canola oil. They each help with depression and reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Can I drink alcohol whilst detoxing from ecstasy?

    No. Alcohol is an addictive substance. You mustn’t take any mood-altering substances whilst in detox. Such an interaction could lead to a fatal overdose or cause brain damage.

    Can you detox from crack?

    Yes, your body will naturally make an attempt to eliminate the toxic remnants in your system after a while without the drug. However, the process of detoxing from crack can be turbulent and challenging, because unpleasant withdrawal symptoms will flare up during this time and compel you to use again. However, you can detox safely from the drug if you go through the process under medical supervision. It is never advised to undergo detox on your own due to the dangerous hazards associated with crack withdrawal. If you or a relative have made the decision to quit, please endeavour to seek help immediately.

    Is crack detox medication dangerous?

    If you’re to undergo detox in an addiction treatment facility, you’ll be put through different medication therapies to help ease the detox process and keep your body safe from the dangers that come with withdrawal. Certain medications will be administered to soften severe withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety, depression, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and a host of others that may appear.

    While these medications play a vital role during the detox process, some possess addictive properties of their own, albeit lesser than crack. This means that you should never self-medicate with these drugs as you may be exchanging one danger for another, or you may be putting yourself at more risk.

    How long does crack cocaine withdrawal last?

    Crack addiction affects everyone differently and, as such, people have different experiences going through withdrawal. The onset and longevity of each individual’s withdrawal will depend on many factors including their level of tolerance, how much crack they have consumed, how long they have been using, as well as their mental and physical health. Physical symptoms of withdrawal may be present for 1-3 months, although the severity of these symptoms tends to reduce as time goes on. Psychological symptoms may last for 6 months depending on the user’s condition.

    Are there any home remedies for crack withdrawal?

    You can take measures to ease your withdrawal from home but it is critical that you seek professional help whenever you want to quit. Do not attempt to self-medicate as this could be dangerous to your health.

    What is the waiting time for crack cocaine detox clinics?

    The best way to put an end to your crack abuse is by starting a safe and detox process in a facility dedicated to this purpose. There are competent detox clinics in the UK that can help you achieve this and see you get on the right track to recovery. However, some detox clinics have long waiting times that may make it frustrating for you. At UKAT, we have clinics that can admit you in as little as 24 hours, with an option for immediate intake also available.

    How long does crack cocaine stay in your system?

    Despite the short-acting nature of crack, it tends to stay in the body long after its effects have worn off. The body absorbs crack very quickly, but it can linger in different areas, such as the hair and bodily fluids for days or weeks. The drug can be detected after a long while depending on the method of testing used. Crack can be detected in the blood after 8 hours of use and this period can be as low as 2 hours in some individuals. In urine, the drug is generally known to last about 1-4 days, but this duration can be longer or shorter depending on the level of crack abuse. Crack cocaine stays the longest in hair samples where it can be detected months after use.

    Helping Someone Overcome Addiction to Weed

    Addicts generally go through emotional problems alongside their physical challenges due to their addiction to substances like cannabis. While some are hooked on the pleasurable effects of marijuana, others are willing to quit but can’t get themselves to face the task due to lack of help and other factors such as withdrawal. If you have a loved one going through the ordeal of cannabis addiction, please call them and let them know that you understand their situation and that there is help available. If you can’t do this on your own, you can stage an intervention with other close relatives and friends or with the help of a professional interventionist.

    What causes addictions?

    Addictions are caused by a range of factors which vary from person to person. Causes can be attributed to peer influence or keeping company that encourages the abuse of illicit drugs; environmental conditions where an individual is exposed to drug and alcohol misuse from a young age; the need to quell emotional tension sometimes leading to misuse of harmful substances; and in some cases, drug abuse stems from a legitimate prescription that involved drugs with high abuse potentials such as amphetamines, sleeping pills, and cannabis. Research has found that there are genetic factors linked with addiction where an individual will have a high risk of becoming an addict if they had a parent or relative that has been addicted in the past.

    How addictions can affect you?

    Addiction to a substance such as cannabis can impact different aspects of your life or those of your loved one. The most dangerous in the long run are serious health effects that can lead to death. You can also suffer difficulties in other areas of your life such as legal issues, financial difficulties, housing issues, a breakdown in relationships, as well as employment challenges. If you’re a parent and are abusing marijuana, this will have consequences for your children as well as other loved ones and family members close to you. It is important that you make the effort to quit as soon as you realise that your use of this substance is getting out of control.

    How marijuana addiction develops?

    Marijuana is known to produce pleasurable effects in users who smoke it or ingest it through other means. These effects or highs produced by the drug cause users to repeatedly take the substance which results in tolerance, dependence, and ultimately, addiction. The changes caused by the substance in the body makes the brain get used to its presence and gradually adjust to it. This will lead to dependence on cannabis to initiate the feelings of pleasure in the body. Over time, the body will begin to demand more of the substance, as the usual amount will become inadequate for maintaining the effects. When you get to this point, you’ll begin to compulsively take the drug, going to great lengths to make sure you consume over and over. At this point, you’re addicted and will need urgent professional help to break free.

    Can you get addicted to weed?

    While some people may deny the addictive nature of cannabis, addiction to the substance is real. Numerous studies have found that, though less addictive than some other drugs, cannabis can cause an addiction in months of using it and can also lead to dangerous health consequences. If you have misused this substance over a long period, your likelihood of staying hooked on it is high.

    Withdrawal symptoms can begin to take place after a long period of cannabis addiction. While marijuana is addictive, you can also break free from this problem with proper help. A lot of people have fallen victim to cannabis addiction, but with professional assistance, they’ve been able to pick themselves up and forge a new, healthy lifestyle for themselves.

    Possible effects on teens

    Teenagers are a demographic that is more prone to using marijuana and is more exposed to the substance. According to research, individuals who start to use weed before they are 18 have a higher likelihood of developing a cannabis use disorder than those who begin to use the drug later in life. The effects of the substance on teens spread to different aspects of their lives, from their relationships with others to their academics and careers. Tell-tale signs of cannabis addiction in teens can be easily spotted if you pay close attention as a parent, guardian, or close relative. It’s vital that you stay on the look-out, as weed can leave the life of a teenager unmanageable if help is not provided on time.

    How does crack cocaine affect my brain?

    Crack is typically smoked, which means it gets to the brain very quickly after being absorbed from the lungs into the bloodstream. When it’s introduced to the brain, it induces a spike in the levels of dopamine, thereby increasing sensations of pleasure and euphoria in a very short time. The effects of crack only last for about 5-10 minutes, causing users to repeatedly take the drug. When the brain gets used to the presence of crack, it begins to rely on the drug to recreate these feelings and reactions causing you to become dependent. With more doses, you’ll end up becoming fully addicted to the drug.

    What are crack withdrawal symptoms?

    Anyone who’s addicted to crack cocaine has become dependent on the drug. This means that if they stop taking the drug for a while, their body functions may go out of control. This is signalled by the intense withdrawal symptoms that occur whenever an addict attempts to quit using or doesn’t have access to the drug for a while. Due to the high potency of crack, its withdrawal symptoms are more powerful than that of cocaine and, without proper care, dangerous health complications may occur. Some symptoms of crack cocaine withdrawal include:

    • Emotional outbursts
    • Inability to feel pleasure
    • Agitation
    • Irritability
    • Difficulty sleeping
    • Exhaustion
    • Mood swings
    What should I do if a friend overdoses on crack cocaine?

    The short effects of crack easily put users at risk of overdosing on crack because they want to feel “high” for as long as possible. Any case of overdose is very dangerous and may kill someone. If you have a friend that is a constant crack user, there’s a high chance that they may fall victim to an overdose. Whenever you’re faced with this situation, call for medical help immediately. Before help arrives, you should take safety measures by keeping them away from harmful objects if they’re experiencing seizures, make efforts to keep their body temperature low with cold compresses and stay with them till help arrives.

    Does crack cocaine affect my kidneys?

    Crack cocaine has dangerous health effects on different organs of the body including the kidneys. While heart conditions have been attributed to crack and other cocaine forms, connection to dangerous renal issues have surfaced. According to research, the most common form of the crack-induced renal disease is rhabdomyolysis, which is a serious kidney issue that, coupled with crack use, has a high mortality rate.

    Will my boss notice I’m using crack cocaine?

    Drug abuse, especially illicit drugs like crack, are illegal and attract severe punishment in workplaces. In most situations, you may outrightly lose your job if your drug abuse is found out. While you may try very hard to conceal your drug use, continued use of crack will ultimately expose your addiction through your performance, lack of concentration, and change in behavioural traits. You should seek help immediately if you notice that you can’t control your use of crack anymore.

    How do I know if I need detox?

    Ecstasy disrupts the brain’s chemistry and can cause damaging health conditions if use isn’t discontinued in time. To get free from an addiction to ecstasy, the drug has to be flushed out of the system at the beginning of treatment through detoxification to help the body regain its chemical balance and function normally again.

    Ideally, you’ll need to detox the moment ecstasy is introduced to your body. It’s safe to stop using after your last dose, in the event that you’ve taken it for the first time. However, if you’ve been taking the drug in large doses over a long period, please endeavour to see an addictions expert to help you with a detox plan that will safely remove the drug from your system.

    How to tell my family I am addicted to ecstasy?

    If you’ve been using ecstasy for a while and are exhibiting signs of abuse, chances are, your family may be nursing suspicions or may already be aware of your addiction. Being addicted to ecstasy means you need all the help you can get to break free from your addiction and lead a normal life. And, with the help of your family members and loved ones, you’ll have a higher chance of achieving recovery.

    While it’s understandable that you may feel like you’ve let them down and don’t have the courage to face them, they’re most likely concerned about your situation and safety and will be willing to help you get your life back on track. You can approach those you’re closest to in an apologetic manner, stating how aware you are of your behaviour and the impact it has had on your life, as well as your willingness to get help and turn over a new leaf.

    How to tell if my teen is hiding their ecstasy use?

    Due to the common use of ecstasy in clubs, music festivals, and parties, teens are one of the demographics that are most affected by ecstasy abuse and addiction. There are various signs and behavioural changes that will point to your teens’ use of this drug. Some of the signs that you should look out for include:

    Absenteeism at school: skipping classes is a general indication that something is wrong. If your teen is no longer attending school, there’s something drawing them away and you shouldn’t omit drug use from the possible reasons.

    Irritability: this is a common sign in teenagers who have used ecstasy the previous day.

    Difficulty sleeping: ecstasy increases energy to abnormal levels, causing lack of sleep in those that use. If you notice that your teens’ sleep pattern has become abnormal, this can be a sign of ecstasy use.

    Late nights: ecstasy is often found at nightclubs or parties. As a parent, you should keep an eye on your teen if they often sneak out at night.

    Why is ecstasy dangerous?

    The psychoactive and addictive effects of ecstasy make the drug potentially lethal to the body if taken for a considerably long time. In fact, most susceptible users are faced with immediate toxicity which can lead to life-threatening health effects after taking a single dose.

    Can I drive after having taken ecstasy?

    The UK’s Drug Driving Law prohibits driving under the influence of certain prescription drugs and other substances, including ecstasy, which can impair the motor skills and the reaction of the driver. The penalty for driving even after a day of ecstasy use is the same as drink driving.

    What is the legal status of ecstasy?

    Ecstasy is an illegal substance in the UK and is categorised as a Class A substance alongside drugs like crack cocaine, cocaine, methadone, and heroin. You can get a prison sentence of 7 years or an unlimited fine or both for possession alone, with the penalty for supply and production attracting a steeper sentence of life imprisonment, a fine or both.

    Why is my use affecting my relationships?

    Ecstasy use and addiction can hurt your relationship with others as you’ll begin to place more priority on your use of the drug over other responsibilities in your life such as your commitment to these relationships. You’ll also begin to go absent during appointments and will disappoint in carrying out certain tasks. Essentially, your relationships will be affected because your use of ecstasy will turn you into a completely different person.

    Is heroin addiction physical or psychological?

    Heroin is extremely addictive – both physically and psychologically. Repeated use of heroin will lead to a psychological dependence, whereby the user feels the need to take the drug all the time to induce euphoria or just to fend off depression and cravings that come from not taking it. Physical dependence also builds with continued use of the drug; typically, just a few hours after last taking heroin, the user feels the physical symptoms of withdrawal, which are extremely unpleasant and can only be kept at bay by taking more heroin.

    Is heroin addiction difficult to overcome?

    Yes. It is very difficult to overcome heroin addiction – especially if the abuser has no one to turn to for help. It is dangerous and almost impossible to overcome heroin all by one’s self, because of the intense withdrawal symptoms an addict will face. However, with professional help, it’s easier and safer to break the habit and kick the addiction.

    How is heroin addiction treated?

    There is a wide range of treatment approaches to tackle heroin addiction. The most effective course is a combination of residential rehab, prescribed medications and therapy. Detoxification is also a necessary step, while medication makes withdrawal easier and therapy addresses the root cause of the addiction.

    What medications are used for heroin addiction?

    There are a number of medications used to fight heroin addiction. Some of them include Methadone, Buprenorphine, Suboxone and other various medications which act as sedatives, antipsychotics and antidepressants. These are only used in accordance with a doctor’s instructions.

    How does heroin addiction start?

    Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs anyone can take. Addiction is brought about by repeated abuse of the drug. Even after only a few doses, a user can start to build a dependence on heroin. When this happens, addiction can quickly develop and a person becomes dependent on the drug.

    How can you overcome heroin addiction?

    Heroin addiction can be overcome by first admitting you have a problem and seeking professional help. You can’t beat this disease alone, so open up to a loved one and seek professional guidance.
    If possible, register with a rehab centre to help you overcome this addiction.

    How bad is heroin addiction?

    Heroin addiction is a major risk factor for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and other diseases. It has many health risks associated with it and is potentially fatal.

    Can heroin addiction kill you?

    Yes. Heroin addicts suffer the risk of experiencing a fatal overdose, resulting in death.

    Can you recover from heroin addiction?

    Yes. You can recover from heroin addiction if you seek treatment and professional help and adhere to the instructions of your physician and therapist. However, the first step to recovery is reaching out for help.

    How do I know if I have a drug problem?

    While this may be a cliché it is also undeniably true: if you need to ask yourself that question, the answer is probably yes. Recreational drug use on the odd occasion tends not to prompt such thoughts: if you are concerned that you have a problem is usually because you feel you are taking drugs to excess or, even more worryingly, you have tried and failed to stop taking drugs. At this point – and especially if you develop any withdrawal symptoms after not taking the drug for a day or two – you should recognise that you have a problem.

    When is it time to seek help?

    Simply put, the earlier you can reach out for help the better. As soon you recognise you have a problem, try and stop taking drugs: if you manage to do so by yourself, without experiencing significant withdrawal symptoms and cravings, then you are not addicted and simply need to make sure you do not resume your drug consumption (however if you are unable to resist doing so, you are addicted). If you cannot stop taking drugs then contact an addiction specialist immediately so you can get into treatment before the problem gets any worse.

    How do I stage an intervention?

    An intervention is an extremely risky procedure in terms of its potential to cause great rifts between the addict and their loved ones, so getting it right is essential. With this in mind if you are contemplating putting an intervention in place, it’s important that you contact an addiction specialist for advice rather than simply going it alone without any experience: things can go very wrong, with long-term implications for everyone involved.

    Who is at risk of drug addiction?

    Although scientists and doctors have not yet been able precisely to identify the specific causes of addiction, it’s clear that both environmental and genetic factors play roles, and as a result people with certain experiences – for example, childhood abuse or repeated trauma – are more likely than others both to engage in substance abuse and subsequently to develop addiction. However, there is no hard and fast rule, and one person may become addicted while another with exactly the same experiences may not. Effectively, anyone taking addictive substances repeatedly over any length of time is at risk of developing an addiction to them, regardless of background.

    What are the common signs of substance abuse?

    There are a great many different signs and symptoms of drug abuse – different drugs have different signs associated with them, while different people may react differently to drug use and abuse. Typically, drug consumption may result in the manifestation of signs and symptoms including, but not limited to: dilated pupils; impaired motor control, cognitive functions, communication skills and decision-making; mood swings; sweating; nausea; dizziness; drowsiness; lethargy; extreme exuberance; hyper-sexualisation; irritability; aggression; depression; flulike symptoms; euphoria; heightened empathy; and many more.

    What are the risk factors associated with drug addiction?

    There are a broad range of risk factors, both environmental and genetic, associated with drug addiction. Some of the most prominent include childhood abuse and repeated trauma; exposure to substances of abuse in the home was growing up; a peer group amongst whom drug abuse is common; poverty; early exposure to alcohol; a member of the family with a substance abuse disorder.

    How long does withdrawal last?

    The precise duration of withdrawal will depend on various factors such as the physiology of the addict, the substance of abuse, the dosages consumed and the methods of consumption. Generally speaking withdrawal will last between one and two weeks, with symptoms peaking after two or three days; however some symptoms may persist for much longer.

    What can I expect from physical withdrawal?

    Physical withdrawal from a substance of abuse is usually accompanied by nausea and vomiting; insomnia; restlessness; agitation; muscle cramps and spasms; diarrhoea and other digestive problems; flulike symptoms including fever, sore throat, and runny nose; sweating; shivering; aggression; mood swings; and depression. Every case is unique and some addicts may experience few or none of the above; however most are likely to have at least some at some stage of withdrawal.

    What is psychological withdrawal?

    Psychological withdrawal is the process of readjusting mentally to a life without drugs (specifically from the substance of abuse to which you have become addicted). Psychological withdrawal symptoms often include insomnia; paranoia; mood swings; depression; aggression; irritability; and nightmares. In extreme cases psychosis may also manifest.

    When is detox necessary?

    Detox is necessary whenever someone has become dependent – either psychologically or physically – upon a substance of abuse and wishes to stop taking that substance permanently. It is a necessary preparatory step for later phases of recovery including therapy.

    Which medications are used during detox?

    The medications used during medically assisted detox will depend upon the substance of abuse and the nature of the withdrawal symptoms being experienced. Antidepressants may be prescribed for depression; hypnotics and sedatives may address insomnia, mood swings and aggression; benzodiazepines may be given as antianxiety medication and also to address dangerous symptoms of withdrawal from alcohol; meanwhile some opioids such as methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone may be given as a substitute for heroin or other stronger and more addictive opioids. Other drugs may be prescribed on a case-by-case basis.

    What are the most common drug withdrawal symptoms?

    Withdrawal symptoms differ from one case to another but the most common include insomnia; paranoia; mood swings; depression; aggression; irritability; nightmares; nausea and vomiting; restlessness; agitation; muscle cramps and spasms; diarrhoea and other digestive problems; flulike symptoms including fever, sore throat, and runny nose; sweating; shivering; and psychosis.

    How long does a drug detox last for?

    Every case of addiction and withdrawal is unique, and people experience withdrawal symptoms differently and for varying lengths of time. Typically, detox will last between one and two weeks with most symptoms declining in the second week until the addict’s system is free of substances of abuse. In some cases post-acute withdrawal syndrome may develop which may require long-term therapy.

    Is it possible to complete a home drug detox?

    Various home drug detox options are available, especially marketed online; however it is strongly recommended never to go through detox and withdrawal without medical assistance as to do so can be fatal. Some home detox kits are not medically approved and may contain substances which may interact dangerously with your substance of abuse, or to which you may be allergic.

    What are the benefits of a drug detox?

    The benefits of a drug detox are to cleanse an addict’s system of substances of abuse so they no longer feel the immediate pressure from their own body and mind to consume drugs, and can move on to therapy as the next phase in a permanent recovery.

    Can drug withdrawal cause seizures?

    Yes: withdrawal from some substances – most notably alcohol and benzodiazepines – can cause seizures which can be fatal without medical assistance.

    What causes addiction?

    Addiction is not caused by one single thing. For some people, it can be one event or lifestyle choice that triggers an addiction while for others it can be a combination of factors. The cause of addiction is not the same for everyone, so it can be impossible to predict who will and who will not be affected. Nevertheless, there are certain risk factors that can increase the chances of a person developing an addiction. These include things such as unresolved trauma, a family history of addiction, the presence of mental health problems, and early exposure to mood-altering chemicals.

    Having more than one risk factor increases the chance of addiction developing, but it does not guarantee it. There are some individuals who have no risk factors who still become addicted to a mood-altering substance; there are others with every risk factor but never have a problem.

    How to get help for addiction?

    If you are struggling with an addiction, it is important that you get help as soon as possible. The sooner you reach out for help, the sooner you can put your days of substance abuse behind you. Your doctor may be able to provide information on how to get help or refer you to your local treatment service.

    You can also get in touch with a local support group; you can find details of those in your area through an online information database. For information on private inpatient programmes, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us here at UKAT.

    Am I addicted?

    It is not uncommon for those addicted to drugs such as cocaine to be living in denial. It is easier to pretend that everything is okay rather than having to face up to the reality of addiction and needing treatment. Some are hoping that by doing nothing their illness will pass on its own, but this is never the case.

    It is a good idea to take a close look at your substance use to determine if you have an addiction. If you are taking more drugs than you did when you first began using them, it is probably because you have developed a tolerance. This happens quite quickly with mood altering substances as your brain adjusts to them. However, if you have a compulsive need for a drug such as cocaine and are powerless to resist this urge, it is highly likely that you are addicted.

    How do people get addicted?

    Addiction usually occurs after a tolerance to a drug develops. When you begin abusing more of the drug in response to it becoming less effective, your risk of a physical or psychological dependence will increase.
    A drug dependency means that you are almost certainly going to experience withdrawal symptoms when you try to quit, or even significantly cut down on your use. If you continue using drugs to avoid the onset of these symptoms, your risk of addiction will increase.

    How does cocaine impact the mind and the body?

    Cocaine has a profound effect on the mind and body. It stimulates the brain’s pleasure centre, which results in a surge of feel-good chemicals, known as dopamine, being released. Cocaine also prevents the brain from reabsorbing the dopamine, which it normally does when it is released naturally. This then causes an accumulation of these chemicals in the brain and the euphoric feelings associated with use of the drug.

    Cocaine is a stimulant drug that causes the central nervous system to speed up. This can lead to a raised temperature and a rapid heartbeat, among other things. Users of the drug tend to feel alert and confident, but the effects do not last for very long and are typically followed by a crashing comedown. Some will feel as though they have the flu as their body adjusts to the stimulant effects wearing off.

    How to know when someone needs help?

    Helping someone with an addiction to cocaine can be a challenge as most addicts are not willing to see themselves as such – at least not initially. It can be hard to tell if your suspicions are correct if the person you love is deliberately trying to hide his or her drug use. Nonetheless, there are signs that you can look out for, such as extreme mood swings, paranoia, and over-confidence.

    Your loved one might also be displaying behavioural signs such as a lack of interest in hobbies or activities that were once enjoyed or becoming increasingly isolated and withdrawn. If you believe that someone you care about is addicted to cocaine, you should speak to them about getting help.

    Should rehab be away from home or not?

    The issue of where to get help for addiction is one that most addicts face. As there are so many treatment providers offering excellent programmes across the UK, you will have plenty of choice about where to complete your recovery.

    Where the clinic is located may be important to you, but it is all about preference and convenience. You might like the idea of a remote location where you can recover in quiet, peaceful surroundings, so this could mean choosing a clinic located in another town. However, if you want your family members and friends to be able to visit you or attend family therapy sessions, then choosing a clinic closer to home is more appropriate.

    What free options are there?

    Private rehabilitation programmes come with a fee, but not everyone can afford such treatment for addiction. The good news is that outpatient programmes provided by the NHS and charity organisations are free.

    You can also access free care and support through local groups such as Cocaine or Narcotics Anonymous. For information on the free options in your area, consult your doctor or check an online information database.

    How to find a detox programme?

    Not knowing where to look for a suitable detox programme is often that which prevents people from getting the help needed for their addictions. The good news is that there are many options available in the UK. To get help finding a detox programme, speak to your doctor who can recommend a suitable provider.
    It is also possible to find information on detox programmes online via an information database. If you would like to know more about our detox programmes, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us. Our advisors can provide information on our clinics and the detox programmes we provide.

    What causes addiction?

    It is not possible to pinpoint an exact cause of addiction. In fact, there can be many reasons someone will develop an addiction while others will not. What it has been possible to do is identify the various risk factors that make it more likely for one person to become addicted than someone else.
    It is thought that family genetics and a family history of addiction increases the risk, as does the presence of an unresolved trauma. Other risk factors include environmental influences, mental health problems, and early exposure to substance abuse.

    Is cocaine withdrawal dangerous?

    While the symptoms associated with cocaine withdrawal are rarely life-threatening, complications can arise, particularly in those who have been abusing more than one substance. Dangerous complications can also occur when a person withdraws from cocaine while having underlying medical issues.

    There is also the risk of overdose if cocaine addicts return to the drug after a period of abstinence. Using the same amount of cocaine that was used before the detox began could cause a fatal overdose due to the individual’s tolerance for the drug dropping dramatically while not using.

    How severe is cocaine withdrawal?

    The severity of a cocaine withdrawal will depend on how much of the drug was being abused before the detox started. Symptoms tend to be mostly psychological, but they can make you feel unwell. It is likely that you will struggle to feel pleasure and you may experience depression and anxiety. When cocaine withdrawals are severe, they can lead to vivid nightmares and even suicidal thoughts.

    How can you reduce harm when you use cocaine?

    Cocaine is a dangerous drug and there is a risk of overdose in those who use it. The best way to reduce harm is to avoid using it completely, but this is easier said than done in those with an addiction.
    If you are a cocaine user, you should avoid bingeing on the drug as this can increase your risk for addiction. Because the effects of cocaine wear off quite quickly, you may be tempted to continue using it to prolong the high. Nevertheless, this is dangerous and can increase the severity of the crash that you will inevitably experience.

    Abuse of cocaine with other drugs or alcohol is also something that you should avoid as this can also increase the risk of overdose. It is crucial that you are aware of the signs of overdose and that you know what to do should you or someone you are with experience them after taking too much of the drug or mixing it with another substance. Seeking help immediately can prevent serious complications.

    Is there a link between cocaine and depression?

    Those who abuse cocaine usually experience a surge in pleasure for a short period of time. It stimulates the central nervous system and causes the brain to release a flood of dopamine, which is the body’s natural feel-good chemical. When the effects of cocaine wear off, it is followed by a crash, where users tend to feel very unhappy or depressed.

    Over time, tolerance to the drug develops and more cocaine is required to achieve the same level of pleasure. But continued use of cocaine can cause the body’s natural production of dopamine to drop. This makes it harder for the user to feel pleasure without cocaine and can result in the onset of major depressive disorder. Depression is caused by an imbalance of chemicals in the brain, and this can occur with prolonged regular use of cocaine.

    What recovery programme is right for me?

    With so many options available in terms of cocaine recovery, it can be difficult to know which programme is going to be the right one for you. Overcoming addiction to a drug such as cocaine is about finding a programme that is right for you.

    It is important that you take a number of factors into consideration before choosing a particular programme. For example, inpatient programmes are ideally suited to those with a severe addiction, but if you have commitments at home or at work, they may not be appropriate for your individual situation.

    On the other hand, you may not like the idea of being away from home while you recover, but if you are likely to struggle with staying sober in the real world, outpatient treatment might not be the best fit.
    To find a recovery programme that is right for you, you will need to consider how severe your illness is, what commitments you have at home or at work, your individual preferences, and your budget. Assessing all these factors will ensure that you find a programme that works effectively for you and your needs.

    Which treatments work for cocaine addiction?

    Cocaine addiction is difficult to treat, but talking therapies tend to work well. Cognitive behavioural therapy can help you to learn more about why you became addicted in the first place and help you to recognise the negative thoughts that drive your behaviour.
    Incentive therapy such as contingency management is also useful. This type of therapy provides rewards for good behaviour and consequences for bad behaviour.

    Does treatment for cocaine addiction work?

    Treatments used for cocaine addiction tend to be based on the needs of the individual. Every person will be given a bespoke treatment plan that is expected to work effectively for them. However, for treatment to work, you must be fully committed to the programme and have a fervent desire to get clean and stay clean.

    How does cocaine affect the brain?

    Cocaine has a profound effect on the brain. It causes a surge of pleasure when it is taken because it encourages the production of the brain’s natural feel-good chemical dopamine.
    Dopamine is normally released by the brain naturally in response to possible rewards such as the smell or sight of nice food. The dopamine that is produced naturally is then absorbed back by the brain.

    The difference with cocaine is that the feel-good chemicals released when the drug is taken is not reabsorbed back into the brain. This causes it to build up and induces intense feelings of euphoria.

    What are the other health effects of cocaine use?

    Cocaine use can lead to many health problems. In the short term it can affect sleep patterns and appetite, but if use of the drug continues, it can result in insomnia, exhaustion, and malnutrition. There is also an increased risk of heart problems due to the stimulant effects of the drug while many other organs can also suffer long-term damage including the lungs, kidneys, and liver.
    As well as the impact on physical health, continued regular abuse of cocaine can cause mental health problems such as paranoia, schizophrenia, and psychosis.

    What is cross addiction?

    Cocaine users regularly use other substances to enhance the effects of each or to take the edge off the jitteriness and agitation that can occur with cocaine use. Alcohol and other sedative drugs might be used, which can then lead to cross addiction, where the user is struggling with a dependence on both substances.

    Treatment for cross addiction is much more complex and usually requires a longer rehab programme as both illnesses need to be treated at the same time. During detox, each substance must be withdrawn completely to prevent complications with withdrawal.

    What to do when you recognise signs of addiction?

    If you believe that you may have developed an addiction to cocaine, it is important that you seek help immediately. Addiction is a progressive illness and doing nothing at this point could cause your situation to deteriorate further.

    For advice on how to get your life back under control, speak to your doctor who can then refer you to a local drug treatment service. You may also find the information you need via an online information database. You can then self-refer if you prefer.

    If you have questions regarding your situation and would like answers before speaking to a doctor, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us here at UKAT. We would be happy to assist by providing a comprehensive assessment of your situation. This will give you a clearer picture of what you are dealing with. We can also provide information about the programmes that are available through our many clinics if you are interested in inpatient care.

    Am I addicted?

    It is hard to come to terms with the fact that you may have developed an addiction to cocaine, but it is important to look honestly at your use of the drug. An addiction is characterised by a compulsive need for a substance and a failure to stop using it even when it is interfering with your ability to live a normal life.
    If you have been abusing cocaine despite it causing harm to yourself or others, it may be the case that you have an addiction. If you have promised yourself or the people you love that you would stop using cocaine but were unable to resist the cravings, it is time to seek help.

    Knowing when someone needs help?

    Just as it is important to be able to recognise the signs of addiction in yourself, it is equally important to be alert to the signs in someone you love. You may notice changes in the behaviour of a loved one if an addiction to cocaine becomes an issue.
    Addiction often results in individuals losing interest in those around them and they may also lose all motivation to do things that they once enjoyed. If your loved one has started to act strangely and you suspect that cocaine abuse may be to blame, it is important to address the issue head on.

    Does cocaine have any legitimate medical uses?

    Although a highly addictive drug, there are some medical uses for cocaine. Topical cocaine such as TAC (tetracaine, adrenaline and cocaine) was developed in 1980 and is used as a topical anaesthetic for paediatric use. It can be used as a local anaesthetic in paediatric patients being treated for skin lacerations. Cocaine can also be used for certain eye and nasal surgeries.
    Although still occasionally used in medicine, cocaine is used less frequently now because of its addictive properties and because other alternative substances have subsequently been developed.

    Are there dangerous hidden ingredients in cocaine?

    Cocaine sold on the streets is rarely pure and unscrupulous dealers often mix it with other substances to maximise their profits. Unfortunately, some cocaine batches can be mixed with dangerous ingredients.
    For example, a drug that is used for the treatment of livestock that have parasitic worms, known as levamisole, may be mixed with cocaine in order to add weight to the drug. When used in humans, levamisole attacks white blood cells and can weaken the immune system. This can lead to infections, some of which could end up being deadly.

    Cocaine can also be combined with anaesthetics such as lidocaine and benzocaine. But when these anaesthetics are mixed with cocaine, complications often arise. The lungs, heart and brain can be particularly affected.

    What causes cannabis addiction?

    Using cannabis over a prolonged period of time and in increasing doses leads to addiction. You can also become addicted to cannabis if you’re generally prone to addiction, due to certain environmental or genetic factors.

    Some risk factors which could predispose you or a loved one to addiction include ready access to cannabis; close affiliation with peers who use cannabis; dropping out of school; poor parenting; emotional distress; and frequent use at a young age, amongst others. Studies have found adolescents and people with mental health conditions to be at greater risk of developing a cannabis addiction.

    How can I stop cannabis addiction?

    Recovering from cannabis addiction takes time, but it can be done. Everyone is different and so your brain is bound to change in a different manner from that of someone else. In certain cases, recovery won’t take as long as it might in most other cases.
    If you or a loved one have tried to stop cannabis addiction several times with no success, your best bet is to speak to an expert and enrol in a rehabilitation facility, where you can receive adequate professional treatment.

    How can I beat cannabis addiction?

    The best way to beat cannabis addiction is to stop, even before it begins. This means discontinuing cannabis abuse while you still have control over your life. However, it may be too late before you even realise the need to beat addiction..

    In order to beat addiction for good, you can seek professional help via a social worker, counsellor or psychotherapist. In addition, holistic practices can also help as you focus on trying to improve yourself physically, spiritually and mentally. These include mindfulness, meditation, eating healthily and exercising.

    How can I manage cannabis addiction?

    Cannabis addiction can be difficult not only for the addict to deal with but also for their family. However, addiction has to be managed whilst seeking treatment – especially as cannabis addiction can take years to treat.

    You can start by delaying the urge to smoke and doing your best to de-stress using other methods. In addition to averting stress, avoid other possible triggers for cannabis use. Educating yourself about addiction can also be a great help, as well as finding a healthy distraction to engage yourself with.

    Where can I help for cannabis addiction?

    UKAT offers world-class addiction treatment in various facilities across the UK. All our rehab centres are fully equipped to handle cannabis addiction, so whether you’re in Banbury or Essex, you’re bound to find a UKAT rehab centre close to you. Our treatment team comprises experts who have worked in the addiction treatment sphere for years, so rest assured you’re in good hands.

    What is the most addictive drug?

    How addictive a drug is depends very much on the person taking it, who may be predisposed towards addiction of one form or another. However, some drugs including opioids such as heroin, and benzodiazepines, are not only psychologically addictive but creative physical dependency as well: that is, the addict’s body becomes reliant upon the presence of the drug in their system, as well as their mind craving the drug to feel “normal”. Most specialists and medical professionals would consider heroin to be the most addictive drug, but really any substance can be addictive if you are inclined in a particular way.

    How can I help a drug addict?

    There are many ways to help a drug addict but they invariably boil down to helping them to help themselves: only they can take the first crucial step of acknowledging their addiction and reaching out for help. Speak to a trained addiction specialist to discuss a specific situation and get advice on how to help a particular person; do not do anything that places you or anyone else in any danger.

    Am I addicted to drugs?

    It is a cliché, but usually if you have to ask if you are addicted to drugs, you usually are. The key sign is if you have tried to stop using drugs but have been unable to do so – or even if you haven’t tried to stop using, if you have been unable to get hold of your particular drug of choice for a day or two and have started to show various withdrawal symptoms then you are certainly dependent. The bottom line is that typically a person becomes addicted a while before they are aware of it: therefore, by the time you come to ask yourself that question, it is usually too late. Contact an addiction specialist to discuss your situation in full.

    Where can I get help for drug addiction?

    Treatment facilities for drug addiction can be found right across the UK; speak with your GP or with an addiction specialist to discuss options available near you.

    Can hypnosis cure drug addiction?

    Hypnosis is a little understood phenomenon that many people associate with miracle cure. It is certainly true that some people have found themselves benefiting from hypnosis; it is also unfortunately true that many people suffer detrimental psychological effects after going through hypnosis. Consult an addiction specialist before embarking on any kind of treatment; in the case of hypnosis you should also speak with your GP to discuss whether or not your personal situation would be helped by that type of approach, and if there is any danger in doing so.

    How can I break my drug addiction?

    The best course of treatment for drug addiction is residential rehabilitation (“rehab”) which combines medically assisted detox with a range of therapy models in an attractive, peaceful, and wholly confidential environment.

    What causes relapse?

    Relapse can be caused by a huge variety of “triggers” – events, people, images and a host of other drivers which prompt thoughts of drug abuse in the mind of the recovering addict and which, if the addict is not suitably prepared with psychological safety mechanisms developed in therapy, may lead to a resumption of the consumption of drugs. Each individual addict as his or her own triggers, so it is impossible to say conclusively what causes relapse; however, it is generally accepted that only therapy can give a recovering addict the defence mechanisms they need to resist the temptation to relapse.

    What is drug rehab?

    Drug rehab – short for ” rehabilitation” – is the provision of drug addiction treatment at a dedicated secure facility away from the temptations and distractions of the outside world, and in particular the environment in which an addict has become accustomed to indulging in substance abuse. At rehab an addict has access to highly experienced medical care 24/7, as well as to a variety of therapies through which they can come to understand the nature and underlying causes of their addiction. Rehab is also, crucially, highly confidential, allowing the addict to remain confident that their condition will not become common knowledge outside the facility.

    How much does rehab cost?

    The cost of rehab varies considerably from one facility to the next and depends on the specific treatment which an addict requires. Moreover, logically the longer a person spends in rehab the more the process will cost. As a result it’s impossible to put a price on rehab which will apply to every given circumstance, though roughly speaking patients should typically expect to pay somewhere around £3,000 per week – which compared with the long-term cost of most addictions should be considered one of the most valuable investments you could ever make.

    How do I pay for private rehab?

    Patients can either pay for rehab treatment privately, or through medical insurance, and some patients receive funding through their national health insurer – in the United Kingdom this is the NHS or the local authority.

    How does drug rehab work?

    Drug rehab invariably begins with the process of detoxification – “detox” – whereby the addict’s system is cleansed of substances of abuse (and during which they may experience withdrawal symptoms, which may be ameliorated with medication); following detox, they move into a therapy phase during which the underlying causes of their addiction are investigated and defence mechanisms put in place to enable them to resist relapse once they leave the facility.

    Pros and cons of NHS versus private rehab?

    NHS treatment is of a very high quality, and is of course free at the point of service, while private rehab does come with a significant cost attached. However with NHS budgets strained to bursting, and with so many addicts competing for such limited space, there is no guarantee that you will get a referral at all, and even if you do waiting times can be extremely long – which in a tragically high number of cases has meant the difference between life and death. Private rehab are able to admit addicts immediately so that they can begin getting the help they need straightaway.

    What is a medical drug detox?

    A medical detox involves the provision of drugs to treat symptoms of withdrawal, or to substitute less harmful and addictive drugs on a temporary basis for the substances to which an individual has been addicted; they are then able to be weaned off the substitute substance whilst experiencing less severe withdrawal symptoms.

    What type of drugs does rehab treat?

    The drugs treated will vary from one rehab to another, with some specialising in certain substances and others catering for many or all types of addiction. Most rehabs will have experience in treating addiction to prominent drugs including cocaine, heroin, amphetamines (including ecstasy) and cannabis, as well as alcohol. Speak with an addiction specialist to find out which rehab facilities have experience in treating specific drugs – or contact the facilities directly.

    How long does rehab take?

    How long a person stays in rehab will vary case-by-case, but a typical stay will last 28 days, with some programmes designed to be of much shorter duration and, at the other extreme, with some addicts choosing to stay for significantly longer, even several months, if they do not feel able to return to daily life after one month.

    How to stay drug free after rehab?

    Remaining drug-free after you leave rehab is an ongoing challenge; however alongside the defence mechanisms you will be given during therapy in rehab, you may benefit from attending fellowship group meetings or having ongoing therapy, as well as taking advantage of any aftercare provided by your rehab.

    Is drug rehab covered by private insurance?

    Some health insurance does cover private rehab; contact your insurer to check whether this applies to your policy specifically.

    Which comes first: mental illness or alcohol abuse?
    There is no black and white answer to this question. In some cases, one disorder definitely precedes the other. But there are plenty of cases in which the two disorders begin manifesting themselves around the same time.
    What is the between alcohol abuse and mental health?
    There is a definite link between alcohol abuse and mental health. Exactly what that link is has not yet been established. There is some speculation that there is a common trigger that may lead to co-occurring disorders.
    Why is it important to treat both the mood disorder and the alcohol use?
    Dual diagnosis treatments make a point of treating both disorders simultaneously so as to avoid the potential consequences of treating only one. Treating just one could make the other worse.
    When does alcohol addiction mean a dual diagnosis?
    Alcohol addiction can indicate a dual diagnosis when it is accompanied by symptoms of an underlying mental disorder such as depression, anxiety, etc.
    How is a dual diagnosis treated?
    Dual diagnosis scenarios are treated by combining alcohol treatments with the best method for treating the particular mental disorder as chosen by the doctor. The goal is to alleviate the alcohol problem so that more attention can be paid to the mental disorder.
    How common is dual diagnosis?
    Dual diagnosis is more common than most people know. As many as 50% of those suffering from mental health issues are prone to using drugs or alcohol.
    My Friend Refuses to Seek Treatment – What Should I do?
    The truth is, that if your friend is refusing to seek treatment, there isn’t really much that you can do other than support them 100% until they do decide what they want to do. You can’t force them to do anything that they aren’t willing to do. What you can do if it is really badly affecting you, is seek treatment yourself, or access a 12 step group for family and loved ones of addicts and alcoholics. Al-Anon for example host groups that ‘provide support to anyone whose life is, or has been, affected by someone else’s drinking.’ Al-Anon has meetings in most large towns and cities. To find a comprehensive list of meetings locally to you, go to their website: https://www.al-anonuk.org.uk/
    Can I Force my Friend into Treatment?
    As mentioned in the previous question – we can’t force our loved ones to do anything that they don’t want to do, and the truth is, even if we could, it would be pointless as recovery from addiction can only really start once the alcoholic has a true desire to stop drinking. You friend may really want to stop drinking to stop hurting you and the rest of their family and loved ones, but until they want to stop drinking for themselves, no treatment centre will really be able to make that much difference to their sobriety long term.
    My daughter refuses to seek treatment – What should I do?
    If your daughter is refusing to seek treatment try not to panic. The first thing you can do is make sure that you are fully educated around addiction and what your daughter is going through. Make sure that you are still offering support to your daughter, don’t withdraw it or try to force your daughter to seek treatment with threats or guilt trips as it won’t work. As hard as it might be, try to positively encourage them to do the right thing. If you are really worried about your daughter, discuss the option of an intervention with other family members.
    Can I force my daughter into treatment?
    The simple truth is, no – you can’t force your daughter into treatment, and even if you could, it wouldn’t necessarily help. One of the key ingredients to a successful treatment programme is a desire to get sober. Without it, you may put your daughter through a process which is costly and time consuming but won’t work. Unless your daughter can admit that she has a problem, and wants to do something about it, it is unlikely that any rehab will be able to help her long-term.
    Support Workers
    Support Workers required to work in our substance misuse rehabilitation centres across the UK, in the following regions:

    • Halton
    • Bradford
    • Essex
    • West Sussex
    • Surrey
    • Bedfordshire
    • Oxfordshire

    Zero hours contracts across all of the Group’s centres within the UK.

    Benefits:

    • 28 days paid holiday per year
    • Full training programme
    • Pension benefits

    We require experienced individuals to fulfil the role of a Support Worker at our private addiction treatment centres.

    Applicants must be fully experienced and familiar with this type of setting.

    Duties will include all aspects of medications administration, facilitating new admissions and providing general support to a high standard for the client group.

    Applicants must be able to multi-task and work on their own initiative while adhering to UK Addiction Treatment Limited’s Policies and Procedures within a very demanding setting. This is an exciting opportunity for the right person.

    General Responsibilities

    • To engage effectively with the client group
    • To prepare and distribute medication to clients
    • To meet the needs of UKAT’s premises/property security
    • To liaise effectively and cooperatively with colleagues
    • To have completed the induction process
    • To be working towards Level 3 Health and Social Care
    • To undertake regular training and supervision sessions in-house and externally
    • To comply with UKAT’s policies, procedures and terms and conditions
    • To have good time keeping and attendance
    • To have good general and overall conduct and presentation
    • To carry out all tasks with professionalism and in accordance with UKAT’s policies, particularly those on Equality, Diversity and Confidentiality.
    • Any other duties and responsibilities expressed and implied which arise from the nature and character of the post within the Organisation.
    • Light cleaning duties
    • Escorting clients off site to meetings and appointments
    • Supervising clients when they are out

    Core Responsibilities:

    Client work

    • To provide appropriate support to clients in accordance with therapists’ instructions
    • To answer the phone when required and ensure all messages are passed on to relevant colleagues
    • To ensure all client medication and prescriptions are dealt with appropriately and to give medication to clients as required following company guidelines.
    • To have an enhanced DBS clearance

    Networking and Liaison

    • To develop and maintain supportive working relationships with colleagues and promote a team working approach at all times

    House Duties

    • To perform overnight duties according to weekly rotas
    • To carry out light cleaning and tidying duties as necessary

    General Duties

    • To maintain the working environment in line with health and safety requirements (fire drills and cut off points)
    • To take part in staff meetings and supervision sessions as required by the manager
    • To actively participate in training, development and supervision
    • To work within a team context, recognising the dynamics and responsibilities of each team member
    • To undertake any other duties that may from time to time reasonably be requested
    • To be computer literate
    • To read all Company policies within 28 days of your commencement of employment

    Person Specification

    Essential

    • Relevant qualification
    • Proven experience
    • A flexible open approach and proven communication skills
    • Administration skills
    • Confidence to work on own initiative as well as part of the team
    • Knowledge of health and safety, including assessing high-risk situations for clients
    • An empathic and non-judgmental attitude
    • A commitment to support UKAT’s values and mission
    • An ability to effectively work with people regardless of their ethnic, cultural
    • and social backgrounds, their gender, age, religious belief, disability and sexual orientation

    Personal Qualities

    • Ability to work as part of a team
    • Full clean driving license
    • Good communication skills
    • Ability to respond flexibly to the demands of the post
    • Ability to make a personal investment in the development and success of UKAT

    Salary: Dependent on experience

    Apply to become a UKAT Support Worker

    Therapists
    UK Addiction Treatment Group Limited are looking for substance misuse therapists to join our expanding teams across the UK, in the following regions:

    • Halton
    • Bradford
    • Essex
    • West Sussex
    • Surrey
    • Bedfordshire
    • Oxfordshire

    Zero hours contracts across all of the Group’s centres within the UK.

    Person Specification

    The day-to-day delivery of high quality therapeutic support to substance misusing clients who access our centres via statutory or self referral.

    Role Purpose:

    • To provide counselling, support in relations to substance misuse.
    • To communicate UKAT’s vision and deliver its mission
    • To provide direct client services by way of group and key work
    • To meet key service objectives in line with UKAT’s policies, procedures and data collection systems.

    Main Duties and Responsibilities:

    • To contribute to assessments of clients within agreed timescales
    • To deliver a structured therapeutic support programme through group-work sessions and one to one interventions
    • To contribute to regular reviews of the client with probation (where appropriate) and health workers or other relevant agencies
    • To counsel individuals about their substance use using recognised theoretical models
    • To help individuals address their substance use and offending behaviour through an agreed action plan
    • To maintain records of the client attendance and participation in the group programme
    • To explore, implement and supervise a range of approaches, activities and exercises, which are designed to promote health and support individuals through detoxification/stabilisation
    • To utilise recording and statistical systems to collect and collate data and to ensure that all administration, case recording, written reports etc are maintained to agreed standards
    • To utilise a flexible approach and where required participate in activities and tasks which directly respond to client need
    • To uphold all UKAT’s policies and procedures and actively promote equality of opportunity in the course of your work
    • To maintain a safe and welcoming environment ensuring health and safety standards are adhered to
    • Ensure regular consultation with service users and promote their equality, diversity and rights
    • To contribute positively to relevant internal and external forums
    • To collaborate effectively with partner agencies and bring a proactive approach to partnership work
    • To undertake any other duties as instructed by the Senior Therapist and Directors that will contribute to fulfilling UKAT’s aims

    General Terms of Reference

    In carrying out the above duties the therapist will:

    • Work closely with partner agencies.
    • Work flexibly within agreed hours to maintain the level of service provision.
    • Participate in regular training, supervision and appraisal to improve their performance.
    • Keep abreast of developments in services, legislation and practice relevant to the client group.

    Confidentiality

    Ensure confidentiality at all times, only releasing confidential information obtained during the course of employment to those acting in an official capacity.

    Essential criteria

    • Counselling Diploma
    • Experience of direct work with substance misusing clients
    • Two years’ experience of direct client work with at least one years’ experience of working with substance misusers in a therapeutic setting
    • Experience of developing and delivering therapeutic support programmes
    • Experience of providing direct client services particularly assessment & group-work.
    • A flexible open approach and proven communication skills in the management of sessional staff, volunteers and clients.
    • Experience of working in partnership with a range of statutory and non-statutory agencies
    • Proven skills in planning and administration.
    • Ability and willingness to develop the treatment programme to suit client need.
    • Confidence to work on own initiative as well as part of a team.
    • Understanding of the importance of upholding quality standards, performance monitoring and collating appropriate statistical information for purchasers.
    • Knowledge of health and safety, including assessing high-risk situations for clients.
    • Organised and have excellent time management skills
    • An empathic and non-judgmental attitude.
    • Demonstrate the ability to effectively work with people regardless of their ethnic, cultural, social backgrounds, their gender, age, religious belief, disability and sexual orientation
    • Commitment to support UKAT ’s values and mission.

    Personal qualities:

    • Ability to work as part of a team
    • Good communication and interpersonal skills
    • Ability to respond flexibly to the demands of the post
    • Ability to make a personal investment in the development and success of UKAT.

    Desirable criteria:

    • A professional qualification in substance misuse and or counselling.
    • Experience of providing training to fellow professionals.
    • Computer Literacy.

    Salary: Dependent on experience

    Apply to become a UKAT Therapist

    Volunteers
    If you want to give something back to the community, we need you.

    The UK Addiction Treatment Group has residential rehabilitation facilities in the following areas:

    • Halton
    • Bradford
    • Essex
    • West Sussex
    • Surrey
    • Bedfordshire
    • Oxfordshire

    If you are fit and healthy and are keen to help us in any way that you can, then we want to hear from you!

    To get in touch, email us on jobs@ukat.co.uk

    Are rehabs open in London during the Coronavirus outbreak?
    Rehabilitation centres are operating during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics in London, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.

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    Does free alcohol rehab in London exist?
    There are a number of free clinics in London which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, there are no inpatient options. Rehabilitation centres are not free, so for residential rehab your best option is to opt for private treatment.

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    How do I pay for rehab?
    A deposit will be accepted at the beginning of the process and full payment taken a few days later, once you have started your programme.

    Many private rehabilitation companies, including UKAT, accept BUPA insurance. However, be sure to check with your insurance company that your claim is covered.

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    Can I get funding through the NHS?
    Although funding through the NHS is available, it can be a lengthy and emotional process and many applications are turned down.

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    Can you force someone to go to rehab?
    You cannot force someone to go into rehab; it must be their choice. However, you can organise an intervention if you are worried about someone. This involves sitting and talking to your loved one with the help of a professional, in the hope they will listen and follow your advice.

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    What types of drugs can I be treated for in rehab?
    You can be treated for any drug that you have formed a psychological or physical dependence to. Our private rehab clinics specialise in prescription drugs, opiates, benzodiazepines, stimulants and illegal drugs, such as cocaine and cannabis.

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    How long should I go to rehab for?
    The recommended duration of rehab depends on the severity of your addiction and you will be advised by a professional during your admissions process.

    The longer the length of stay in rehab the higher the success rate for staying sober, as you spend more quality time in therapy and in a sober environment, away from temptation.

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    Is rehab confidential?
    If you seek treatment through the NHS, the referral will sit on your medical records. However, employers cannot access these records unless under specific circumstances. So, there is a limited chance of them finding out.

    Private rehabilitation is completely confidential and does not sit on your medical records.

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    Can I visit a loved one during rehab?
    You can visit your loved one for an hour every Sunday at our private centres. However, to prevent the spread of Covid-19 you will not be permitted to visit loved ones during the lockdown.

    Family support groups take place every week at each of our centres and anyone who has a close connection to the patient can join. Not all rehabilitation centres offer this option, so this needs to be checked on their website.

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    Which drug addictions can be treated in rehab?
    Addictions to any of the following drugs can be treated in a rehabilitation clinic: cocaine rehab, crack cocaine rehab, heroin rehab, cannabis rehab, ecstasy rehab and prescription drugs rehab, including benzodiazepines rehab and opiates rehab.

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    How do you test your child for drugs at home?
    Home test kits are available to buy online; however, testing your child for drugs comes across as untrusting. It’s best to observe their behaviour for signs of substance abuse and talk to them openly if you suspect anything.
    How do you talk to your child about drugs and alcohol?
    Dedicate time to broach the subject openly and ask them as many questions as you can think of, including them in the conversation rather than turning it into a lecture.
    How can you tell if your child is on drugs?
    If your child experiences hallucinations, becomes distant and withdrawn, loses interest in hobbies, socialising or personal hygiene, lies about their whereabouts or experiences withdrawal symptoms, they may be abusing drugs.
    How do you protect your child from drugs?
    A child will only be protected from drugs if they are educated on the risks. Explain to them the possible side-effects of drugs and the feasibility of becoming addicted.
    How should you confront your child when you find drugs?
    Calmly talk to them about it by asking questions and having an open conversation. If you are angry or upset, ensure you wind down before bringing up the subject, as lecturing a child about drugs will reduce the likelihood of them listening to your advice.
    How do you explain drug addiction to a child?
    Understanding the consequences of addiction is just as crucial to those under 18 as it is for adults. Children are receptive to honesty, so ask them questions about how much they know about drugs and addiction and explain the possibility of them experiencing the risks listed in this page.
    Step 1: Acceptance
    “We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.”

    Step 1 marks the day we decided to stop drinking and start celebrating our potential.

    Step 2: Trust
    “Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.”

    Step 2 is the moment we realised that we had the resources to overcome the control addiction had on us.

    Step 3: Liberation
    “Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.”

    Step 3 allowed us to let go of anxiety and welcome positive change.

    Step 4: Understanding
    “Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.”

    Step 4 is the action we took to embrace our inner confidence.

    Step 5: Acknowledgement
    “Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.”

    Step 5 marks the achievement of visiting difficult memories and seeing them from new perspectives.

    Step 6: Freedom
    “We’re entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.”

    Step 6 led us toward our higher power (be it personal or religious) and allowed it to help us thrive.

    Step 7: Growth
    “Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.”

    Step 7 gave us the tools to accept guidance from others.

    Step 8: Reflection
    “Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.”

    Step 8 inspired us to reflect on mistakes without dwelling on the past.

    Step 9: Forgiveness
    “Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.”

    Step 9 gave us the opportunity to make peace with those whom we had wronged.

    Step 10: Continuity
    “Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.”

    Step 10 motivated us to continue making positive progress.

    Step 11: Connection
    “Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.”

    Step 11 is the stage we made eternal connection, to persevere through difficult times.

    Step 12: Helping others
    “Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs.”

    Step 12 encouraged us to pass on our wisdom, helping others to achieve their recovery story

    Are rehabs open in Bradford during Coronavirus lockdown?
    Rehabilitation centres in Bradford are open during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are classed as essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.
    How much does an alcohol/drug rehab cost in Bradford?
    Depending on the provider you choose, the cost of rehab for a standard 28-day treatment can cost between £4,000 and £13,500. The price range is based on the quality of the provider and the range of services the programme offers. Shorter and longer programmes are also available in some centres. On specific insurance policies, this is covered by private insurance.
    How do you sign up to a rehab?
    To sign up for private rehab, you need to contact your chosen centre, who will discuss your needs and organise the details for you. For NHS rehab, you must contact your GP, who will make a referral if you meet the requirements.
    How can I pay for a rehab?
    Rehab can be funded privately, or subsidised through private insurance in some cases. Check with your provider to determine which rehab options are covered.
    What rehab programmes are there?
    The 12-step method is the most common programme, which is used by the majority of providers. However, some companies offer a mixture of holistic therapies, such as yoga, mindfulness, CBT and others, alongside the 12-step sessions, for the opportunity to trial a range of recovery tactics.
    Can you force someone to go to rehab?
    You cannot force someone to go to rehab; it must be their choice. However, there are ways of encouraging someone to attend rehab, including honest discussions, visiting the centre before committing to treatment and organising interventions.
    Can I sign up for rehab for someone else?
    You cannot sign up for rehab on someone else’s behalf. For recovery to be successful, the person must be willing to accept help and be open to thinking of addictive substances in a different way. Unless they are open to change, rehab will not be successful.
    How long does a rehab process take?
    Treatment programmes often last from four to twelve weeks, although it is generally acknowledged that the longer a person stays in rehab, the easier it is to stay sober.
    Shorter stays are available, but a minimum of four weeks is usually recommended.
    What is treated in rehabs?
    Rehab can treat anything an individual is addicted to, including alcohol, drugs, gambling, gaming, porn, internet, sex and food. UKAT also treats eating disorders and handles dual-diagnosis and codependency.
    Which drug addictions can be treated in rehab?
    Any drug addiction can be treated in rehab. This includes all illegal drugs, prescription drugs, legal highs, sleeping pills, stimulants and alcohol.
    Is rehab confidential?
    Privately funded rehab is entirely confidential. Free treatment through the NHS will require admittance through your GP, which means it will sit on your medical record. However, this cannot be accessed by anyone outside the medical field without permission.
    Can I visit a person who is in rehab?
    At UKAT, visits are organised every Sunday for those that wish to see loved ones. However, during the Covid-19 pandemic, visiting hours have been put on hold to prevent the risk of the virus spreading into our centres. We are in the process of reintroducing these sessions as safely and quickly as possible.
    Are there free rehabs in Bradford?
    There are a number of free clinics in Bradford which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, these are predominantly outpatient programmes, which mean you cannot stay within the centre during the recovery process.
    Can I get rehab funding through the NHS?
    It is possible to receive rehab funding through the NHS, although it is a lengthy process in which many applications are denied. Applications can be made through discussions with a GP.
    Why is going to a rehab important?
    Rehab provides each individual with the tools to tackle their addiction and remain sober, which is both difficult and dangerous to do alone. Private rehab also introduces you to lifelong contacts and aftercare that will support you through a successful recovery process in the long-term.
    What is the difference between rehab and detox?
    Detox deals with the physical aspect of dependence, whereas rehabilitation works with a person’s attitude towards addiction.

    Detox is the process of withdrawing the body from any harmful substances, such as drugs and alcohol. Rehab involves therapy and recovery principles to help someone change the way they think about addictive substances and prevent them from using.

    Are rehabs open in Liverpool during Coronavirus lockdown?
    Rehabilitation centres in Liverpool are open during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are classed as essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.
    How much does an alcohol/drug rehab cost in Liverpool?
    Depending on the provider you choose, the cost of rehab for a standard 28-day treatment can be between £4,000 and £13,500. The price range is based on the quality of the provider and the range of services the programme offers. Shorter and longer programmes are also available in some centres. On specific insurance policies, this is covered by private insurance.
    Are there free rehabs in Liverpool?
    There are a number of free clinics in Liverpool which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, these are predominantly outpatient programmes, which mean you cannot stay within the centre during the recovery process.
    Are rehabs open in Newcastle during Coronavirus lockdown?
    Rehabilitation centres in Newcastle are open during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are classed as essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.
    How much does an alcohol/drug rehab cost in Newcastle?
    Depending on the provider you choose, cost of rehab for a standard 28-day treatment can vary between £4,000 and £13,500. The price range is based on the quality of the provider and the range of services the programme offers. Shorter and longer programmes are also available in some centres. On specific insurance policies, this is covered by private insurance.
    Are there free rehabs in Newcastle?
    There are a number of free clinics in Newcastle which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, these are predominantly outpatient programmes, which mean you cannot stay within the centre during the recovery process.
    Cannabis
    Extracted from the cannabis plant, this drug comes in the form of green leaves, black resin or brown nuggets. Side-effects vary from lethargy, relaxation, talkativeness, laughter, happiness, paranoia and confusion, based on the user’s state of mind at the time of use. Cannabis can be smoked, eaten or vaped.
    Cocaine
    Cocaine is a stimulant which comes in the form of white or crystalised powder or small rocks. This drug can be injected, smoked or snorted through the nose, to give the feeling of confidence, excitement and alertness. It also increases heart rate, suppresses hunger and causes paranoia.
    Ecstasy
    Ecstasy is a pill which is swallowed to induce feelings of happiness and affection. It is also available in a powder form, which is known as MDMA, and is rubbed on the gums.
    Heroin
    Heroin is made from the poppy plant and is a form of morphine – a painkiller used in hospitals. It can be snorted, smoked or injected to give a feeling of euphoria. Heroin is the most lethal illegal drug in the UK, as it is easy to overdose, especially when injected.
    Alcohol
    Alcohol, otherwise known as ethanol, is a liquid which comes in many different forms of drink. Although legal in the UK, alcohol is the most dangerous and addictive drug available, which contributes to alcohol poisoning, heart attacks, violence, dependency, injuries, cholesterol and liver damage.
    LSD
    LSD is a hallucinogenic drug which comes either in liquid form or as small tabs of paper, and swallowed either directly or in food or drink. The effect of the drug depends on the user’s mood and imagination, but common responses include laughter, empathy, awe, confusion and suspicion.
    What happens after an assessment?
    The Oasis Admissions Manager will liaise with the Oasis Centre Manager and/or Doctor whether or not Oasis are able to meet your service users’ needs. Once an outcome has been decided, the admissions manager will contact you to discuss the next course of action.
    How soon can a service user be admitted for treatment?
    Oasis aim to confirm admission decisions within 72 hours of assessment however, the actual admission date depends on the availability of rooms at the service users’ chosen service.
    How will service users get to the centre?
    Service users can travel to the centre either by themselves, by a family member or by the referring agency. If the service user is travelling by public transport contact your Oasis Admissions Manager who will make arrangements for them to be met at the local train or bus station.
    What will the service user need to take into treatment?
    Please advise your service user to bring sensible clothes, appropriate footwear, toiletries, towels, tobacco (if a smoker), and a small amount of money for occasional purchases.
    Will service users have their own room?
    Single room requests are accepted, the Oasis Centre Manager will confirm if we’re able to meet this request. However, we need to make clear that if the Oasis Centre Manager, the clients focal Counsellor (to be confirmed) and the rest of the therapeutic team decide it would be in the interest of your client to be in a shared room we may require them to move.
    What happens about meals?
    Oasis Runcorn and Oasis Bradford are fully catered and all meals are provided. Clients can purchase confectionary items and tobacco on a regular basis from the local shop.
    Are service users able to bring laptop/kindle/tablet etc?
    Please advise your service user not bring any electronic equipment and/or valuable items with them.
    Will service users be able to have a mobile phone?
    Mobile phones are not allowed at the start of treatment at any of our Centres. Mobile phones are returned to service users after 10 weeks at Oasis Runcorn. At Oasis Bradford mobile phones are not permitted. Clients can make phone calls from our phones during the time that they are not allowed their mobile phones.
    When can family and friends visit?
    At Oasis Runcorn, service user families and friends can visit after 4 weeks. At Oasis Bradford, family can visit from week one. Visits are by appointment with the centre. Visits are usually on a Saturday or Sunday.
    Will service users need to bring prescribed medication with them?
    Yes. They will need to bring enough medication for the duration of their treatment and/or repeat prescriptions.
    Does free alcohol rehab in West Yorkshire exist?
    There are a number of free clinics in West Yorkshire which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, there are no inpatient options. Rehabilitation centres are not free, so for residential rehab your best option is to opt for private treatment.

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    Does free alcohol rehab in Bedfordshire exist?
    There are a number of free clinics in Bedfordshire which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, there are no inpatient options. Rehabilitation centres are not free, so for residential rehab your best option is to opt for private treatment.

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    Does free alcohol rehab in Lancashire exist?
    There are a number of free clinics in Lancashire which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, there are no inpatient options. Rehabilitation centres are not free, so for residential rehab your best option is to opt for private treatment.

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    Does free alcohol rehab in Hertfordshire exist?
    There are a number of free clinics in Hertfordshire which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, there are no inpatient options. Rehabilitation centres are not free, so for residential rehab your best option is to opt for private treatment.

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    Does free alcohol rehab in Berkshire exist?
    There are a number of free clinics in Berkshire which can help you with alcohol or drug abuse. However, there are no inpatient options. Rehabilitation centres are not free, so for residential rehab your best option is to opt for private treatment.

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    Are rehabs open in West Yorkshire during the Coronavirus outbreak?
    Rehabilitation centres are operating during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics in West Yorkshire, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.

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    Are rehabs open in Bedfordshire during the Coronavirus outbreak?
    Rehabilitation centres are operating during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics in Bedfordshire, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.

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    Are rehabs open in Lancashire during the Coronavirus outbreak?
    Rehabilitation centres are operating during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics in Lancashire, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.

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    Are rehabs open in Hertfordshire during the Coronavirus outbreak?
    Rehabilitation centres are operating during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics in Hertfordshire, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.

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    Are rehabs open in Berkshire during the Coronavirus outbreak?
    Rehabilitation centres are operating during the Coronavirus outbreak, as healthcare facilities are essential businesses. This includes private rehab clinics in Berkshire, provided they follow the safety regulations implemented by the government.

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    Step 12 – Helping others
    “Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs.”
    Step 1 – Acceptance
    “We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.”
    Step 2 – Trust
    “Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.”
    Step 3 – Liberation
    “Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.”
    Step 4 – Understanding
    “Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.”
    Step 6 – Freedom
    “We’re entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.”
    Step 5 – Acknowledgement
    “Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.”
    Step 7 – Growth
    “Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.”
    Step 8 – Reflection
    “Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.”
    Step 9 – Forgiveness
    “Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.”
    Step 10 – Continuity
    “Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.”
    Step 11 – Connection
    “Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.”
    1-3 hours after use
    Cocaine has a short-lived effect of around one and a half hours, resulting in withdrawal symptoms appearing within a few hours.

    • Irritability
    • Anxiety
    • Headaches
    • Changes in appetite
    • Severe fatigue
    3 – 5 days after use
    This is commonly the most physically testing time of detox; if you can manage these short few days, you are well on your way to recovery. Be sure to consume enough water and other healthy drinks to avoid dehydration.

    • Increased cocaine cravings
    • Depression
    • Body tremors and chills
    • Vomiting
    • Insomnia and nightmares
    1 – 2 weeks after use
    This phase is physically less demanding yet still mentally taxing. It is particularly important to have emotional support during this period, as you are likely to experience a lack of motivation to stay clean, along with continued cocaine cravings. This week is the last phase of detox before your body and mind start to heal themselves, making it crucial to hold on tight and push through.

    • Exhaustion
    • Lack of motivation
    • Feelings of anhedonia (lack of pleasure)
    • Dissatisfaction
    • Some cocaine cravings
    5 – 10 weeks after use
    Withdrawal symptoms will start to dissipate as your physical and mental state start to heal. Some cocaine cravings still occur, and common anxiety can be prevalent.
    Once you have conquered the withdrawal phase, you’ll be well on to the recovery process.
    What are the side effects of cocaine?
    Side effects of cocaine include feelings of euphoria, increased alertness, talkativeness, paranoia and feelings of anxiousness. Long term use can lead to heart attacks, strokes, seizures and organ damage, and in some cases, depression and chronic anxiety.
    What are the signs of cocaine addiction?
    Although the signs of cocaine addiction are difficult to spot, the biggest warning signs are taking larger volumes of the drug in order to experience a high, and being unable to stop taking cocaine due to physical withdrawal or anxiety.

    Other signs include lying to people about your cocaine use, a loss of interest in activities, and personal relationships being affected.

    How do you treat cocaine addiction?
    Cocaine addiction can only be treated by identifying the root causes of the addiction and practising healthy coping mechanisms to deal with cravings. This is achieved at a rehabilitation centre, where you will also detox from cocaine safely before starting your programme.
    Why is alcohol addictive?
    Alcohol is both physically and psychologically addictive. The brain produces chemical stimulants to balance out alcohol’s depressant effects. If you stop drinking, there will be an excess of these stimulants, which causes unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.
    Alcohol is often used as a coping mechanism to deal with trauma. An addiction develops when you are unable to cope with the symptoms of those conditions without alcohol.
    What is considered an alcoholic?
    There is no specific number of alcohol units per day or week that define a person as an alcoholic. Rather, an alcoholic is a person who drinks compulsively and is unable to stop even though their alcohol abuse is causing serious negative consequences in their life.
    What causes alcoholism?
    There are various environmental factors that can cause or contribute to alcoholism, including trauma, being exposed to alcohol from a young age, regular binge drinking and extreme stress at work or home.
    What are alcohol withdrawal symptoms?
    There are various withdrawal effects which you may experience when you stop drinking, which vary in severity based on the extent of your drinking, your general health and your reaction to detox.

    Mild alcohol withdrawal symptoms include:

    • excessive sweating
    • tremors
    • difficulty sleeping
    • nausea

    More severe alcohol symptoms may include:

    • rapid heart rate
    • hallucinations
    • seizures
    Is alcohol detox dangerous?
    Alcohol detox can be highly dangerous because withdrawal symptoms can be severe. If you have been using alcohol excessively for a long time, alcohol detox should always be done with medical guidance and supervision.
    How do I remove alcohol from my system?
    The only way to safely remove alcohol from your system is by undergoing a comprehensive alcohol detox programme.
    How much does alcohol rehab cost?
    The cost of rehab varies depending on the alcohol rehab centre you choose and the length of your stay. However, some private insurance policies cover some or all of the costs of rehab so you should check with your provider to see what assistance they can provide.
    When should you go to alcohol rehab?
    You should go to alcohol rehab if you are unable to stop drinking or you compulsively drink even though it is causing negative consequences to your health, work, school life or relationships. If you are worried about yourself or a loved one, you should get in touch with an alcohol rehab centre as soon as possible.
    How quickly can rehab help you recover from alcohol?
    When you stop drinking, the physical cravings for alcohol will subside within a couple of weeks, but you may still experience mental cravings for months or years after you finish treatment. Alcohol rehab will provide you with the tools you need to deal with these cravings so that you don’t need to use alcohol as a coping mechanism.
    What is the most addictive drug?
    While alcohol is the most widely accessible drug, and therefore the most commonly abused, all illicit drugs and many prescription drugs can be highly addictive. That is why treatment for both illicit and prescription drugs is offered at rehab.
    What are the signs of drug addiction?
    There are various physical signs of drug addiction to look out for in yourself and others These include withdrawal symptoms when you stop taking drugs, a compulsive need to take drugs even though they are causing negative consequences in your life, changes in mood and personality, and hiding drug use from others.
    What addictions are treated at drug rehab?
    Drug rehab treats a wide range of illicit and prescription drug addictions. These include cannabis addiction, ecstasy addiction, heroin addiction, cocaine addiction, opiates addiction, benzodiazepines addiction and addiction to volatile substances.
    How do I pay for drug rehab?
    Private rehab is paid for by the patient or family members. However, some private insurance policies will cover some or all of the cost of rehab treatment.
    How long does drug rehab take?
    The recommended length of rehab varies from person to person, but thirty days is the minimum time required to complete the first steps in a 12-step programme.
    Is shopping addiction a mental illness?
    Like all addictions, shopping addiction is both a mental illness in its own right and a symptom of another mental health condition. Some people compulsively shop to help try to deal with depression or anxiety, while others may use it as a way to temporarily forget about a traumatic memory or experience.
    How do I stop a shopping addiction?
    The most effective way to recover from shopping addiction is by attending a professional addiction treatment centre. There the experts will be able to help you understand the underlying causes of your shopping addiction and give you the tools you need to overcome it.
    What is considered a shopping addiction?
    Shopping addiction is a compulsive need to keep buying things or spending money even though it leads to negative consequences in your life. These may be financial difficulties, problems in your relationships or detrimental effects on your mental health.
    How do you detox from prescription medication?
    The best way to detox from prescription medication is at a professional detox centre. There, you will receive guidance and support from medical professionals who will ensure you are safe and comfortable throughout the process. Find out more about our treatment centres.
    How does prescription drug detox work?
    The only way to clear your system of prescription drugs is to stop taking them. To prevent a dangerous reaction, medical professionals at a drug detox centre will monitor your progress. They may also administer medication to help you deal with the withdrawal symptoms; this will depend on what prescription drugs you are detoxing from and your body’s reaction to detox.
    Why is crack cocaine so highly addictive?
    Crack produces a rapid and intense high by affecting the neurotransmitters in your brain, namely dopamine. Dopamine stimulates the reward system, leading the brain to associate crack with pleasure. This positive association can quickly develop into dependency on the drug and structural changes to the brain.
    Can a person die from crack addiction?
    The risk of overdose from crack is high, with most cases of overdose resulting in seizures, organ failure, and sudden death if urgent medical help is not sought. Not only is the risk of overdose high, but crack users often engage in risky behaviour which increases their likelihood of contracting HIV.
    How do you treat crack cocaine addiction?
    If you are struggling with this drug, crack cocaine rehab and addiction therapy can provide you with the tools and skills to stay sober long-term and avoid relapsing. There are a number of different treatment options available depending on the severity of your addiction or your personal preference.
    Can you accidentally abuse Methadone?
    Using Methadone with other medications increases the risk of contracting the side effects from the other medicines and could, in some cases, lead to an overdose.
    Is Methadone addiction guaranteed?
    Methadone is just as addictive as heroin. This means that Methadone addiction is likely to occur after using it for the first few times, and in some cases, the first time.
    Is Methadone safe?
    Providing a doctor has prescribed it, and with a doctor’s supervision, Methadone is safe to use for specific ailments in a hospital where medical health professionals are available to monitor the drug and your reaction to it. They will also ensure that you do not get enough dosage to render you a Methadone abuser or invoke Methadone addiction.
    What do I do if someone is showing symptoms of Methadone addiction?
    The first thing to do is consult a professional. If you are at a loss for what you should do after you have recognised the behavioural or physical symptoms, contacting an addiction professional will be the best way to ensure you get personalised care and advice for your particular situation.
    How to know when your teen is abusing tramadol?
    If you suspect your teen is dabbling in drugs, it is vital to remain alert to the early warning signs. A sudden change in behaviour or a loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities may mean that there is a problem. If you are worried, call us here at UKAT for information on how to approach your teen.
    Are heroin and tramadol the same thing?
    As heroin and tramadol both belong to the same family of drugs, you might be forgiven for thinking they are the same thing, but they are not. While both stimulate the same areas of the brain, heroin is a much stronger substance than tramadol. Tramadol is a prescription drug designed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain and is available via a medical professional. Heroin is a street drug that has no accepted medical benefits.
    What to do if you are concerned a loved one may be addicted to tramadol?
    If you are worried about someone you care about and believe that he or she has developed an addiction to tramadol, it is vital that you act immediately. Speak to the person in a calm manner and express your concerns. Remember that your loved one may not yet be ready to admit that the addiction exists. However, by raising your concerns, they may at least start to consider the possibility that their tramadol use is out of control.
    Is gambling a mental health issue?
    Gambling addiction is a behavioural addiction, which is a mental health disorder.
    How do I stop gambling?
    Reaching out to a loved one, GP or support group to pursue help for your struggle is the first step you can take to stopping your gambling addiction.
    What are the signs of gambling addiction?
    Feeling as if gambling is consuming your life, increasing your bets beyond what you can afford, being unable to stop yourself from gambling, withdrawing loans to continue gambling and accumulating overwhelming sums of debt, are all common signs of gambling addiction.
    How do I tell my family I’m addicted to ecstasy?
    If you’ve been using ecstasy for a while and are exhibiting signs of abuse, chances are, your family may be nursing suspicions or may already be aware of your addiction. Being addicted to ecstasy means you need all the help you can get to break free from your addiction and lead a normal life – with the help of your family members and loved ones, you’ll have a higher chance of achieving recovery.

    While it’s understandable that you may feel like you’ve let them down and don’t have the courage to face them, they’re most likely concerned about your situation and safety and will be willing to help you get your life back on track. You can approach those you’re closest to in an apologetic manner, stating how aware you are of your behaviour and the impact it has had on your life, as well as your willingness to seek help and turn over a new leaf.

    Why is my use of ecstasy affecting my relationships?
    Ecstasy use and addiction can hurt your relationship with others as you’ll begin to prioritise the drug over other responsibilities in your life, such as your commitment to these relationships. You may begin to miss appointments and not follow through with commitments. Essentially, your relationships may be affected because your use of ecstasy will turn you into a completely different person.
    My friend is abusing ecstasy – how can I help them?
    If your friend has reached out to you for help, it is important that you provide as much support as you can give. You can assist in making appointments with health professionals, researching treatment facilities (for cases of dependence or addiction), accompanying them to their appointments if need be, and providing a positive environment for them. If your friend is resistant to help, you can try to convince them to seek a professional opinion. You can also gather information and share it with your friend.
    What is the best treatment for gambling addiction?
    Psychoanalytic therapies including DBT (Dialectical Behaviour Therapy) and CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) are often effective treatments for gambling addiction. Discussing your struggle with a therapist can provide insight into the underlying mental health issues that have developed into gambling addiction.
    Is Ativan addiction fatal?
    Unfortunately, addiction can cause judgement impediment, where the drug can be taken irresponsibly enough to cause a negative reaction with another substance. It can also cause an overdose, which could be fatal.
    How should I approach an Ativan addict?
    You should always be empathetic and understanding when talking to an addict about their addiction. However, it’s important to also set clear boundaries on what you will and will not tolerate, to keep you safe and encourage your loved one to recognise damaging behaviour.
    Is Ativan addiction worse than other addictions?
    Addictions are not worse or better than one another. As a collective, addictions are unhealthy coping mechanisms that should be remedied by eliminating the substance and working through the underlying issue. This is no different in the case of Ativan addiction.
    What is the average time for rehab?
    The more time you can commit to drug or alcohol addiction treatment, the better your chances of recovery. However, different people have different levels of addiction, so many rehab centres offer different lengths of treatment programmes. Typically, most people spend between 28 and 90 days in rehab with a further aftercare programme when they leave.
    Is rehab the same as recovery?
    While the two terms are sometimes used synonymously, they are not the same thing. Rehab, or rehabilitation, is the name given to both the addiction treatment process and the facility where that treatment takes place. Similarly, drug and alcohol recovery is a process where a person works to overcome an addiction or improve their life or health, but it does not necessarily involve going to rehab.
    What is the most effective rehab treatment programme?
    The most effective treatment for addiction is through a programme that is tailored to your specific needs. This means being provided with a range of different therapies and activities which address your unique underlying causes, such as those offered at UKAT.
    How do I choose the right rehab for me?
    Choosing the best rehab to match your specific needs can seem daunting, especially if you have unique requirements that need to be taken into consideration. For example, some facilities provide tailored services such as LGBTQ rehab, rehab for professionals and rehab for veterans. If you require any more information about specialised rehabs, you can consult with our site or contact a member of our admissions team to learn more.

     

    How do I get rid of cannabis addiction?
    It is highly advised to surround yourself with a strong support group at an addiction recovery clinic. Professional guidance from those that can offer first-hand advice helps you to implement routine and reinforces that you are not alone and can recover from the psychological effects of cannabis addiction.
    Is cannabis bad for you?
    Cannabis is a powerful substance that introduces artificial chemicals to your brain. The psychological effects of the excess chemicals could have lasting effects on your cognitive performance, detrimental to functions such as concentration, memory and decision making.
    Are there health benefits of cannabis?
    Cannabis contains two main cannabinoids, namely THC and CBD. THC is the component that is commonly associated with cannabis. THC is intoxicating and induces pleasurable feelings. CBD on the other hand is a non-intoxicating and non-euphoric component of cannabis, which has a medical purpose. CBD is used to treat pain, anxiety and diabetes.
    How can I manage cannabis addiction?
    Cannabis addiction, just as any other substance addiction, can be all-consuming. A cannabis addiction will dictate your thoughts and actions, which makes it important to seek professional medical help when quitting cannabis to ensure your comfort and safety. It is ill advised to treat your cannabis addiction without the help of a medical professional.
    Where can I get help for cannabis addiction?
    The UK has an array of experienced and highly trained treatment facilities all over the country, which give you the best possible chance of making a successful recovery in a safe and comfortable environment. UKAT has helped thousands of people overcome cannabis addiction and continues to do so today. find out more about our centres and what is the best rehab for you.
    How long is the 12-step programme?
    Some people may take three to six months to complete their 12 steps to recovery, but others may take a year or longer. It is not a race, and everybody’s recovery journey moves at a different pace. The most important thing is that you give yourself the time to accept your past and reconcile with others so that you can begin to make healthier, happier life choices.
    Where can I access the 12-step programme?
    All eight UKAT rehabilitation centres located around England integrate the 12 steps into our holistic treatment programmes. We combine detox with psychoanalytic therapy to provide clients with the best chance of recovery. Alternatively, you can access the 12-step programme at your local addiction support group such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA).
    Is the 12-step programme international?
    Yes. The 12 steps programme is implemented around the world by many addiction support workers. This treatment was created by American psychologists, and has since gained traction through mutual aid fellowships such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA).
    Are there alternatives to the 12 steps to recovery?
    Yes. Should you wish to not participate in the 12-steps programme during your inpatient rehab treatment at a UKAT rehab clinic, you can choose to partake in the Strengths model programme which is designed to address past traumas and triggers.
    Is addiction a mental health issue?
    Yes, addiction comes under the umbrella of mental health, and it needs to be treated with the same level of seriousness as any other mental health condition.
    What are the different types of addiction?
    Addiction appears in many forms; the most common type of addiction is substance addiction. This is when a person has both a physical and psychological dependence on either drugs, alcohol, or food. There are also behavioural addictions, which entails people frequently repeating various habits to achieve a short-lived “high”. Such addictions include gambling, porn, love, shopping, or internet addictions.
    What are the effects of addiction?
    Addiction’s sole aim is to isolate people. It can cause them to become detached from their loved ones, their work and society in general. When people become isolated, they suffer an enormous amount of painful consequences. Without treatment, addiction may also cause severe physical health problems that, in some cases, can be fatal.
    How do I avoid a Halcion addiction?
    To minimise the risk of Halcion addiction, it should only be consumed as the doctor prescribed. When taking Halcion in therapeutic doses over a short period, it is considered a safe drug. The potential for Halcion addiction exists if you are abusing it or taking it for an extended period. This can result in physical dependence and Halcion addiction.
    Is Halcion safe?
    Halcion is a drug and should be treated just like any other pharmaceutical or illicit drug. Consuming drugs of any kind always presents risks, rarely making it safe. It is important to understand what Halcion abuse is and to avoid it at all costs, as Halcion addiction can quickly ensue.
    Do you need treatment for Halcion addiction?
    Physically you’ll need medical treatment to safely overcome the withdrawal symptoms of Halcion addiction. Psychologically, it’s highly advised to surround yourself with a strong support group at a Halcion rehab clinic. Professional guidance from those that can offer first-hand advice helps you to implement routine and reinforces that you are not alone and can recover from the psychological and physical effects of Halcion addiction.
    Is heroin addiction physical or psychological?
    Heroin is extremely addictive – both physically and psychologically. Physical dependence builds with continued use of the drug. This leads to unpleasant physical symptoms just a few hours after taking it, that can only be kept at bay by taking more heroin. Repeated use will eventually lead to psychological dependence. The user may feel the need to take the drug all the time to induce euphoria or just to fend off depression and cravings that come from not taking it.
    How can I overcome heroin addiction?
    Heroin addiction can be overcome by first admitting you have a problem and then seeking professional help. You can’t beat this illness alone, so open up to a loved one and seek professional guidance.
    What causes food addiction?
    The causes of food addiction are complex and varied, often involving stress, poor self-image, past traumas, additional mental health disorders or personality disorders. At UKAT, our highly trained teams recognise how these symptoms manifest and just how difficult asking for help can be. You can take your first step towards recovery today by getting in touch with us for a free consultation session.
    Can you cure food addiction?
    Food addiction cannot be cured with medicine or therapy, but you can begin recovery by reaching out to eating disorder charities, support groups or inpatient treatment centres.
    How much time does it take to break a food addiction?
    It can take anywhere between a few weeks and several months to break the cycle of food addiction. Ending the negative cycle of guilt and trauma that fuels food addiction typically depends on the nature of the addictive food (sugar, salt etc.), genetics and your constitution. People form new habits and lifestyle routines at different rates, and everyone has their own unique timeline for food addiction recovery.
    Can I stop a food addiction by myself?
    You can take the adequate steps to remove addictive foods from your diet, but it can be difficult to maintain a long-term recovery from food addiction with no support. Receiving the support of a healthcare professional, such as one of our addiction support workers, will help you to confront the psychological factors of food addiction and learn how to manage cravings.
    What risk factors increase the chance of opioid addiction?
    There are a variety of factors that increase the likelihood of an opioid addiction developing. Family history, where people have grown up around others who have an addiction, is highly correlated. Some people also have a genetic predisposition. It’s very common for those with addictions to also have mental health conditions and histories of trauma.
    Is opiate addiction physical or psychological?
    Opiates are both physically and psychologically addictive. Using opiates illegally or taking them outside of medical guidelines can cause severe withdrawal symptoms. Psychological withdrawal will cause the user to feel they need opiates to manage their moods and cravings. Physical withdrawal leads to felt symptoms in the body such as shaking, sickness and diarrhoea and severe pain.
    How to tell if your teen is abusing opiates?
    It can be difficult to know when teenagers are abusing opiates because the signs and symptoms associated with drug abuse are also considered ‘normal’ behaviour for teenagers going through emotional and physical changes.

    Keep an eye out for a change in performance at school, new friends, mood swings and a sudden lack of interest in hobbies. If behavioural changes are coupled with physical symptoms such as constricted pupils, changes in appetite and fatigue, your child may be suffering from opiate addiction, and it’s important to act quickly.

    Are benzodiazepines safe?
    You should always consume any drug carefully, whether that is pharmaceutical or illicit drugs, as they all present a great health risk. If you vigilantly follow the doctors’ instructions, abide by your prescribed dosage and never consume it for a long period, benzodiazepine consumption can be safe.
    How can I manage a benzodiazepine addiction?
    Benzodiazepine addiction is all-consuming and will dictate your thoughts and actions, making it dangerous to manage alone. Benzodiazepine addiction will have you acting out of character, continuously placing yourself at risk. When you have decided to take control, you will require professional medical help to secure your mental and physical health.
    Where can I get help for benzodiazepine addiction?
    Fortunately, you have the best possible chance of making a successful recovery right here in the UK. Blessed with experienced professional medical staff, the facilities in the UK offer safe and comfortable treatment. UKAT has helped thousands of people overcome benzodiazepine addiction and continues to do so today, read on to find the best rehab centre for you.
    Is codeine addictive if bought over the counter?
    Yes, over-the-counter codeine is an opiate and can be highly addictive. That is why you should always follow the recommended dosage and seek medical advice if you are unsure about how much to take.
    Is codeine addiction dangerous?
    Codeine addiction can be very dangerous as it can cause a number of health issues. Also, because codeine is an opiate, it can sometimes act as a pathway to the abuse and addiction of other opiates, including heroin.
    How does codeine make a person feel?
    In addition to its pain-relieving qualities, codeine can give you a general sense of calm and help you feel less anxious or stressed. However, you can develop a tolerance very quickly, which means you need to take more and more codeine to maintain its effects.
    How does codeine addiction affect your mental health?
    Codeine addiction can lead to a number of mental health issues, including acute anxiety and depression. If you stop taking codeine after prolonged use, these feelings can be extreme and, in the most serious cases, can result in chronic depression, self-harm and suicidal thoughts.
    Who gets addicted to Xanax?
    Xanax addiction does not discriminate. Anyone who uses the drug for more than six weeks is at substantial risk of developing an addiction. You could become addicted to Xanax regardless of your sex, ethnicity, education level, socioeconomic status, religion or creed.
    Is Xanax addictive in low doses?
    Yes. Even in low doses, Xanax interferes with how GABA and its associated receptor work. There is significant evidence to show that, in some cases, the body never fully recovers from this drug. As there is no way to know how your body would respond to Xanax, the best precaution is to not take the chance.
    How do I help someone who is addicted to Xanax?
    You cannot force anyone into addiction treatment. The best thing you can do is offer your support and, in the meantime, look for treatment options so that you’re ready should the person make a decision to seek treatment. If you would like to try to encourage a treatment decision, consider conducting an intervention.
    Do environmental factors contribute to temazepam addiction?
    One of the main contributing factors to temazepam addiction is genetics, as addictive genetic traits are passed from generation to generation. It is important to take note of environmental factors that can encourage a temazepam addiction, with the most common contributing environmental factors being peer pressure, especially prevalent amongst children, being unemployed and having a low socioeconomic status. These are the most common environmental factors contributing to temazepam addiction.
    Is temazepam safe?
    It is important to understand temazepam is still a drug and should be treated as such. Using drugs always presents risks, rarely making it safe. Even prescription drugs have risks if not used properly. Always strictly follow the doctor’s orders and never consume more than the prescription states.
    Do I need help for a temazepam addiction?
    Like many Benzo addictions, temazepam addiction is a serious medical condition which requires professional medical assistance. When you decide to quit abusing temazepam, especially after long-term abuse, you will experience severe withdrawal symptoms. These withdrawal symptoms will have a devastating impact on your physical and psychological health if left untreated. Before attempting to quit abusing temazepam, it is highly advised to seek help from your local GP doctor first, as he would be able to provide you with a list of treatment options in your area.
    How to avoid a temazepam addiction?
    The most obvious and easiest way to avoid a temazepam addiction is to never consume the drug. If you have been prescribed the drug by a medical professional, you can safely consume temazepam by strictly following the dosage instructions and not self-medicating. Always contact your medical professional before increasing your dosage. Avoid a temazepam addiction by never consuming temazepam for a long period and using it for no longer than two weeks at a time.
    Can you overdose on morphine?
    Morphine abuse can easily result in an overdose. Signs of overdose can include slurred speech, drowsiness, high blood pressure and lack of responsiveness. It is important to seek help if you ever notice these signs yourself or a loved one.
    What happens if I stop taking morphine?
    A sudden withdrawal from morphine can be very dangerous, so it is important to seek professional help when wanting to become free of morphine. Some common withdrawal symptoms include sickness, confusion, hallucinations, and headaches.
    Can I overcome morphine addiction?
    Yes. By seeking the right support and making lifestyle changes, you can make a healthy recovery by completing morphine detox and morphine rehab. There are many people who have broken free from morphine addiction and dramatically changed their lives for the better.
    Is nitrazepam the same as Mogadon?
    Yes. Mogadon is one of many brand names for nitrazepam, a drug of the benzodiazepine class used to provide relief from insomnia and severe anxiety.
    Who is most likely to develop Mogadon addiction?
    Medications like Mogadon have a high potential for dependence, and anyone who is prescribed the drug runs the highest risk of developing an addiction. However, anyone who takes Mogadon recreationally can fall victim to Mogadon addiction, as they may develop a tolerance after just a few uses.
    What happens if you overdose on nitrazepam?
    Overdosing on nitrazepam can cause a range of symptoms, such as difficulty breathing and intense drowsiness. In the most serious cases, results can be far more severe, with the possibility of serious diseases developing, and, in some cases, even death.
    Can you overdose on Librium?
    Librium poses a threat of overdose, especially when used concurrently with alcohol, opioids or other benzodiazepines. Librium is just as dangerous as any other illicit drug and should only be used as the doctor prescribed.
    Is Librium used recreationally?
    Librium is taken recreationally in the UK, as many seek the high it offers. Librium is a potent sedative drug, offering recreational users an escape from their reality or pain.
    For how long can I take Librium before it becomes addictive?
    Librium is an extremely addictive drug that you can safely consume for a short period of up to four weeks. Using it for longer than four weeks vastly improves the odds of developing Librium addiction.
    Can I go through detox by myself?
    It is possible to detox alone. However, we advise against this. Attempting to wean your body off harmful substances is a serious process, and with your brain accustomed to the drugs in your system, stopping your intake without warning can lead to significant health consequences without the appropriate medical intervention.
    Is detox dangerous?
    The process of detoxification can be dangerous without the right help. As well as psychological risks, there are physical withdrawal symptoms to be mindful of, such as seizures, vomiting and Delirium Tremens, which can prove severe. Access to around-the-clock medical support is highly recommended, as it will ensure the safest possible experience.
    When do I need to detox?
    A common misconception of detox is that your addiction needs to be unmanageable before it is time to consider treatment. However, if you feel that your illness is interfering with your quality of life and you wish to make a change, whatever stage in your journey, there is never a wrong time to detox.
    Can you take OxyContin without developing addiction?
    OxyContin should be consumed carefully, just as the doctor instructed; otherwise, it can be as dangerous as illicit drugs. When taking OxyContin in therapeutic doses over a short period, it is considered safe. However, tolerance to OxyContin develops quickly and can result in OxyContin addiction if abused or consumed for longer periods.
    Is OxyContin safe?
    If you strictly follow the doctor’s advice and never consume more than the prescription states, OxyContin can be considered safe.
    How do I avoid OxyContin addiction?
    The easiest way to avoid an OxyContin addiction is to avoid consuming the drug. If a medical professional prescribes you OxyContin, only consume it for a short period and never in excess. If you feel as if you may be developing a tolerance, seek professional support straight away.
    How do you get addicted to Klonopin?
    Klonopin addiction is an issue across all socio-economic spheres in the UK. Using Klonopin for an extended period commonly induces Klonopin addiction, making it vitally important to consume Klonopin exactly as the doctor prescribed and never for an extended period.
    Is Klonopin safe?
    The consumption of pharmaceutical drugs carries health risks, especially when you abuse them. People commonly perceive Klonopin as safe, as prescribed to them by a medical professional, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Klonopin consumption places you at risk of Klonopin addiction because it is so highly addictive, so it’s important to understand the dangers.
    Is taking Klonopin once a week addictive?
    Taking Klonopin once a week can be considered safe, as a Klonopin addiction is unlikely to develop if it is consumed so rarely.
    How can I prevent Klonopin addiction?
    Consuming a drug, whether it be a legal or illegal substance, places you at risk of addiction. The risk of Klonopin addiction is serious but can be prevented if you follow the doctor’s instructions on dosage and never use it for recreation purposes.
    Can you overdose on Valium?
    If you use Valium more frequently or in larger doses than recommended by the doctor, you are placing yourself at risk of overdose. If you want to increase your dosage, always first seek professional medical advice before starting to self-medicate.
    Is Valium safe?
    Valium can be safe when used as prescribed by a medical professional. However, it is highly addictive, so it’s important to understand the dangers of Valium addiction, which can be as damaging as any other illicit drug. Consuming any drug poses risks, rarely making it safe.
    What’s the difference between Valium and diazepam?
    Diazepam is a type of drug, whereas Valium is a brand name for this substance. Valium is the most popular diazepam drug around the world, offering its users relief from severe anxiety.
    Is Fentanyl medication safe?
    Fentanyl is safe when used for a short period in small doses. However, using any drug presents risks, and Fentanyl is no exception. There are severe health risks to abusing Fentanyl, so it’s important to take Fentanyl as the doctor instructed.
    How can I manage Fentanyl addiction?
    As with all substance addictions, Fentanyl addiction can be all-consuming. Your addiction to Fentanyl will have you acting in ways out of your control, so we advise that you seek professional medical treatment when dealing with Fentanyl addiction to secure your safety and comfort.
    Where can I get help for Fentanyl addiction?
    You can seek support for Fentanyl addiction at rehab centres, addiction support groups and by talking to friends and family. Overcoming a Fentanyl addiction alone is extremely difficult and requires support from those that have been in your shoes. We have experience treating Fentanyl addiction and can help support you through your recovery journey.
    How common is dual diagnosis?
    Dual diagnosis is more common than most people know, with as many as 50% of those suffering from mental health issues being prone to using drugs or alcohol.
    How does a dual diagnosis affect a person?
    Dual diagnosis affects different people in different ways. In most cases, however, the co-occurring disorders are made worse the longer they are ignored, making it vital to seek medical treatment if you suspect you or a loved one is suffering from a dual diagnosis. Dual diagnosis negatively affects both your mental and physical health, commonly inducing more psychiatric symptoms and physical health problems.
    Which comes first, mental illness or addiction?
    There is no black and white answer to this question. In some cases, one disorder precedes the other. But there are plenty of cases in which the two disorders begin manifesting themselves around the same time.
    How long does Vicodin addiction last?
    Like all other addictions, the effects of Vicodin addiction will, unfortunately, grow increasingly more powerful over time. However, if the correct steps are taken, and you seek help at Vicodin rehab, the addiction can be controlled.
    What is the difference between Vicodin abuse and addiction?
    Vicodin abuse is the general misuse of Vicodin or overly using the drug in times other than those prescribed. Vicodin addiction is the dependency on Vicodin physically and mentally.
    Could Vicodin be safe?
    If prescribed by a doctor, the combination of Hydrocodone and Paracetamol would be safe to use as prescribed. However, without a prescription, this is dangerous and would be considered Vicodin abuse.
    What are the side effects of cocaine?
    Side effects of cocaine include feelings of euphoria, increased alertness, talkativeness, paranoia and feelings of anxiousness. Long term use can lead to heart attacks, strokes, seizures and organ damage, and in some cases, depression and chronic anxiety.
    What are the signs of cocaine addiction?
    Although the signs of cocaine addiction are difficult to spot, the biggest warning signs are taking larger volumes of the drug in order to experience a high, and being unable to stop taking cocaine due to physical withdrawal or anxiety.
    Other signs include lying to people about your cocaine use, a loss of interest in activities, and personal relationships being affected.
    How do you treat cocaine addiction?
    Cocaine addiction can only be treated by identifying the root causes of the addiction and practising healthy coping mechanisms to deal with cravings. This is achieved at a rehabilitation centre, where you will also detox from cocaine safely before starting your programme.
    Is cocaine withdrawal dangerous?
    While the symptoms associated with cocaine withdrawal are rarely life-threatening, complications can arise, particularly in those who have been abusing more than one substance. Dangerous complications can also occur when a person withdraws from cocaine while having underlying medical issues.

    There is also the risk of overdose if cocaine addicts return to the drug after a period of abstinence. Using the same amount of cocaine that was used before the detox began could cause a fatal overdose due to the individual’s tolerance for the drug dropping dramatically while not using.

    How severe is cocaine withdrawal?
    The severity of a cocaine withdrawal will depend on how much of the drug was being abused before the detox started. Symptoms tend to be mostly psychological, but they can make you feel unwell. It is likely that you will struggle to feel pleasure and you may experience depression and anxiety. When cocaine withdrawals are severe, they can lead to vivid nightmares and even suicidal thoughts.
    When should you go to cocaine rehab?
    If you are struggling to stop taking cocaine, cocaine use is starting to interfere with your work or personal life, or loved ones have commented on your addictive behaviour, then we advise you to reach out for support at a rehabilitation centre.
    Does treatment for cocaine addiction work?
    Treatments used for cocaine addiction tend to be based on the needs of the individual. Every person will be given a bespoke treatment plan that is expected to work effectively for them. However, for treatment to work, you must be fully committed to the programme and have a fervent desire to get clean and stay clean.
    How much does rehab treatment cost?
    The cost of rehab can vary depending on the area and the type of treatment you require. However, it is usually priced at around £1,500 – £3,000 per week, although luxury rehab may cost a little more. If you are thinking about attending a private rehab facility and would like to find out specific costings, get in touch. We will be able to provide you with this information on alcohol rehab or drug rehab to aid you in making a decision.

     

    Can I choose a rehab treatment in a different county?
    Depending on the service type there are no issues with seeking treatment in a different county, the only exception would be NHS services which require a referral and GPs would refer you to the nearest service in your area. Private rehab, counselling services and support groups can all be taken up in a different area if you would prefer. When decided on a course of action you must consider:

    • Travelling distance and cost of travel – Especially for those with families or work commitments
    • Level of care – Some counties do not have private rehabs or counsellors who are trained in the field of addiction
    • Triggers – If staying at home or around your area brings about temptation, seeking treatment in a different area may discourage such triggers

    UKAT provides a number of private rehab facilities throughout the UK so if private treatment is a consideration, feel free to get in touch with one of our team so that they can suitably place you.

    What should I do before making a decision on rehab treatment options?
    Always speak to your GP before making any decisions on treatment, as depending on your circumstances they may decide a drug detox or alcohol detox is appropriate before treatment commences. Our private rehabs offer a full medical detox and fully integrated programme, taking the edge off any concerns you may have regarding the safety of your recovery. NHS rehab is an available option although they sometimes require a long waiting period and don’t offer the same quality of care.

    We always recommend that as part of any long-term recovery programme, attending regular AA (Alcoholic Anonymous) or NA (Narcotic Anonymous) meetings will help you abstain from relapse and help to build long-lasting, meaningful friendships.

    Which medications can I take to alleviate fentanyl withdrawal symptoms?
    The most commonly used medications to treat patients when undergoing a medically assisted detox are medicines such as Clonidine, Methadone, and Buprenorphine – all highly effective in alleviating those more uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms.
    Why is it dangerous to detox at home?
    Trying to quit fentanyl without the appropriate medical supervision can be very dangerous. Given the severity of symptoms, it is recommended that you consult with a trained professional who can arrange a gradual withdrawal plan (or ‘taper’) to alleviate withdrawal symptoms and get you well as soon as possible. Without this support, there is a higher possibility of complications occurring.
    How can I help a loved one detox from fentanyl?
    Possibly the most important way to support your loved one during detox is by radiating love and understanding. Expecting recovery but also being prepared for the possibility of relapse will help make you ready for any outcome. It can be difficult to watch someone you love under the grips of addiction, but we would ask that you try not to take it personally. Detox is a very strenuous process, and your loved one will need all the support they can get.
    Is Mogadon withdrawal dangerous?
    Mogadon withdrawal can be dangerous, particularly if you try to detox at home without medical supervision. Sudden withdrawal can lead to severe symptoms such as seizures, which can be life-threatening.
    What does Mogadon withdrawal feel like?
    Unassisted withdrawal can make you feel awful, with symptoms including anxiety, insomnia, sweating, nausea and vomiting. You may also experience mental and psychological symptoms such as depression, irritability and mood swings. Medical detox can help ease these symptoms.
    Where can I access Mogadon detox programmes?
    UKAT offers detox programmes in treatment centres across the UK that can help you to safely and effectively withdraw from Mogadon. We have a team of experienced medical professionals who will support you through every step of the process.
    How can I support a loved one through a crack cocaine detox?
    It’s essential to learn about the signs of crack cocaine withdrawal and allow yourself to be prepared for the various symptoms your loved one may exhibit. Arguments can happen as irritability is a common symptom. Plus, if they are tempted to relapse, it can feel frustrating for you to watch. The best way to support a loved one is to encourage them to detox with professional help.
    Can I undergo crack cocaine detox at home?
    You can undergo a crack cocaine detox at home, but it would be challenging. It would be best to have sufficient support around you; you’ll experience mental and physical symptoms that could cloud your judgement, and it may feel tough to get through without relapsing. To prevent this, it is recommended that you detox under the guidance of professionals and in a safe and secure environment.
    Is detoxing enough to overcome crack cocaine abuse?
    Detoxing is the first and most vital step to take to cleanse your mind and body of crack cocaine. It’s not an easy process, but it is worth it; once detox is complete and you have been through the worst withdrawal symptoms, you will regain your strength and clarity of thinking. Although this is a positive start, it is highly advised to seek therapy treatment to understand how your dependency started and learn the best coping mechanisms to avoid future relapse.
    How many hours of gaming constitutes addiction?
    There is no definitive answer to this question as it depends on the individual. Some people can play games for hours without any problems, while others may develop an addiction after only a few hours of gaming.
    What are the most addictive games on the market?
    Again, there is no definitive answer to this question as different people can become addicted to different games. Some of the most commonly cited examples include “World of Warcraft”, “Fortnite”, “Call of Duty” and “Minecraft” but as these are the most popular games, it would follow that they are also the ones that more people are addicted to.
    Do I need rehab for gaming addiction?
    Rehab is the best way to treat gaming addiction because it provides you with a safe and structured environment in which to recover where you can focus on getting better.
    Is internet addiction worse for teenagers?
    It would appear that young people are at a higher risk of falling victim to internet addiction. Research shows that, among 18–24-year-olds, 78% will check their phones whilst dining out, 81% will do so at work, and 92% will do so while in bed.
    What types of internet addiction are there?
    Internet addiction is an umbrella term that can extend to all compulsions which are driven by internet use, and it is important to note that we can become addicted to any behaviour involving excessive internet consumption, such as gaming addiction, cyber-relational addiction, and social media addiction. Internet addiction can also take many forms. For example, while one individual might be addicted solely to social media, another might split their time between social media and gaming. Such variations are what make treating internet addiction so complex.
    How can I spot internet addiction in a loved one?
    Internet addiction can be challenging to spot, but it helps to recognise the symptoms. For example, if you asked your loved one to step away from their device, would this make them upset or aggressive? Have you noticed physical symptoms, such as fatigue or a change in physical appearance due to their internet use? These are all factors to consider when asking if your loved one is addicted to the internet.
    Does UKAT provide internet addiction treatment?
    Yes. At UKAT, we provide a range of treatment programmes for internet addiction across all of our centres. If you would like any more information about rehab for internet addiction and putting you on the road to life-long recovery, please contact a member of our team right away.
    Is internet addiction a mental illness?
    Internet addiction falls under the category of ‘behavioural addictions’, which are considered by medical professionals as mental illnesses.
    Will I be put on medication for my internet addiction?
    Although medications can be used to manage some of the symptoms associated with internet addiction, professional intervention and therapy is essential for overcoming an addiction, and this is what we would recommend.
    Where can I get help for internet addiction?
    You can access treatment for internet addiction at inpatient or outpatient addiction rehabs and local support groups. UKAT has eight treatment centres across the UK which can help you on the road to recovery.
    How can I support a loved one who is affected by sex and love addiction?
    The most important thing is to be patient, understanding and non-judgemental. Your loved one may be embarrassed about their addiction or even in denial. Speak to your loved one about your feelings and concerns and reassure them that you will be there to support them whatever happens.
    Why are sex addiction and love addiction grouped together?
    Sex and love addiction are often grouped together due to both the connection between love and sex and the shared characteristics of the two conditions. Both are intimacy disorders which can affect yourself and others, particularly romantic and sexual partners.
    Does UKAT provide rehab for sex and love addiction?
    Yes, UKAT provides rehab for sex and love addiction and we have helped many people overcome the conditions. We have a number of rehab centres across the UK which can provide the treatment you need. Get in touch with us today for more information about how we can help.
    What constitutes an eating disorder?
    Eating disorders are a type of behavioural addiction characterised by severe and consistent disturbance in eating patterns that bring about highly distressing thoughts and emotions. Eating disorders can create long-lasting physical, psychological, and social harm if these problems aren’t addressed.
    What’s the most serious eating disorder?
    All eating disorders are considered severe since they can significantly damage a person’s mental, emotional, and physical well-being. However, anorexia is the most common eating disorder with the highest mortality rate; this could be due to the effects immediate starvation has on the body.
    Do I need rehab to recover from an eating disorder?
    Rehab will help people physically recover from the effects of each eating disorder. Although this could be done at home, it will not address the underlying reasons behind the eating disorder. To fix a problem, we need to establish its roots, and rehab is the most effective way. When we have addressed the root cause of eating disorders, we can help you recover permanently.
    How long does it take to recover from an eating disorder?
    There is no specific time frame that you can expect to recover from eating disorders. Every person is different and their recovery will reflect this. The road to recovery won’t always be smooth either; some people will face relapse, although we hope this won’t be a substantial set-back, it is not impossible. Also, it’s important to note that recovery is a lifelong process and the mechanisms you learn in rehab will be deployed throughout your life.
    Why are eating disorders more common in teenagers?
    Around 4% of teenagers suffer from some form of eating disorder. There are many reasons for this. One notable reason is the pressure on society to meet conventional beauty standards. Teenagers are often more self-conscious with their physical appearance and up to 69% of teenage girls are motivated by images of unrealistic beauty conventions from the media.
    What are the initial warning signs of an eating disorder?
    If someone is making dramatic changes to their diet and if they are constantly thinking about food and counting calories it could indicate the start of an eating disorder. This may be further exacerbated by refusing meals or lying about having eaten meals. Another indication is when a person’s emotions become dependent on what they have or haven’t eaten eg., if they become anxious or withdrawn after eating, or obsessively weigh or measure themselves.
    What is the most common prescription drug addiction?
    Opiates, opioids and benzodiazepines are among some of the most commonly abused prescription drugs. These drugs are highly addictive and can overproduce pleasure-enhancing chemicals such as GABA and dopamine. This can result in prescription drug addiction.
    How can you tell if someone is addicted to prescription drugs?
    Although some people may attempt to hide their prescription drug abuse, some giveaway signs and symptoms include social isolation, mood swings, nausea, paranoia, dizziness, low mood, slurred speech, slow breathing, appetite changes and digestive issues.
    What amount of prescription medication causes addiction?
    If you take prescription medication in the prescribed dosage, you are consuming your medication in moderate and safe quantities. However, if you take higher dosages than your prescription, you can develop a prescription drug addiction.
    Which prescribed medications are addictive?
    Many different prescription medications have addictive qualities. Prescription drug addiction can include abuse of painkillers, stimulants, opiates, benzodiazepines and Z-drugs (sleeping pills). Any drug can become psychologically addictive if you become dependent on it for your emotional stability and wellbeing.
    How long does it take to get addicted to prescription drugs?
    Depending on the substance, you can develop a prescription drug addiction within several weeks or months if you are chronically abusing a prescription drug.
    How can I support a loved one during heroin withdrawal and detox?
    The best thing you can do for a loved one is to support them during their detox process and be there for them. It is important to remember that they are going through a difficult time and that heroin withdrawal can affect their moods, actions and ability to think clearly. Try to be understanding and patient with them and offer help and assistance where you can.
    Where can I get a heroin detox treatment?
    UKAT has a number of industry-leading heroin detox and recovery centres located all around the UK. These include:

    Can I die from heroin withdrawal?
    Yes, heroin withdrawal can be dangerous and, in some cases, it can lead to death. The risk of death is dramatically increased if you have pre-existing health conditions or if you try to detox from heroin at home without medical supervision.
    How long does morphine rehab last?
    Treatment length depends on individual circumstances, including how well a given client responds to treatment. The shortest residential treatment programmes at UKAT usually run for just four days but during Covid time this has risen to two weeks due to the need to isolate. The longest programmes can run twelve weeks or longer with aftercare generally going on for one year following treatment discharge.
    How much does inpatient morphine rehab cost?
    Addiction treatment provided by private clinics varies in price. The level of luxury of the clinic, the reputation of the provider, and the length of the programme all play a role in how much you end up paying for treatment. Get in touch with our friendly admission team to know more about rehab cost and the options available
    Can I get free morphine addiction treatment?
    The NHS offers drug addiction treatment by way of outpatient clinics and independent counsellors. You can also get in touch with the charity Turning Point, which may be able to assist you in paying for private morphine rehab.
    Can I die from codeine withdrawal?
    Deaths from codeine withdrawal are extremely rare, but going back to codeine after a period of abstinence can be very dangerous because tolerance reduces significantly. This means that if you then take a large amount of codeine, you could be at risk of a fatal overdose.
    Will my information be kept confidential?
    At UKAT, your personal and medical information will be kept completely private both during your detox and afterwards. It is natural to worry about others finding out that you are in treatment, but you can rest assured that your details and information will not be shared with a third party without your permission.
    How bad is volatile substance abuse in the UK?
    Studies have shown that 57,000 adults (aged 16+) have used glues, solvents, gas, or aerosols in the past. A recent study also showed that 2.4% of adults have used laughing gas, with use highest among 16 – 24 year olds. Solvent abuse is the most common form of substance abuse in teenagers, with 4.2% of 11 – 15 year olds reported having used glue, gas, aerosols, or solvents. These statistics sadly represent a clear ongoing issue with volatile substance abuse in the UK, which is especially prevalent among young people.
    Do I need rehab for volatile substance abuse?
    If you have found yourself trapped in a harmful cycle of volatile substance abuse and are unable to stop, rehab can help you to break free. Despite common misconceptions, volatile substances can be highly addictive, and you may find it difficult to quit without the professional help you can find in a rehab programme. Don’t wait for volatile substances to cause irreparable damage to your health and wellbeing – our team is here to guide you.
    How can I tell if someone is abusing volatile substances?
    Volatile substance abuse can be particularly tricky to spot – you will not find typical drug paraphernalia, but instead regular household items. The signs related to volatile substance abuse may appear similar to alcohol abuse, for example, slurred speech, un-coordinated, dizzy, and feeling nauseous. It is possible that you will find empty aerosol containers, empty nitrous oxide containers and balloons, or other items associated with volatile substance abuse.
    How long does OxyContin addiction treatment last?
    There is no set length of time that applies to OxyContin rehab as the treatment lasts as long as necessary. We usually advise you to spend between three and twelve weeks in rehab but this may be longer in the most severe cases.
    Where can I find an OxyContin rehab programme?
    UKAT has a number of rehab centres around the UK offering OxyContin treatment. These include:

    How much does oxycodone rehab cost?
    There are lots of factors that go into determining the cost of rehab, beginning with the length of stay. Facilities and treatment options will also factor in. At UKAT, our OxyContin programmes range from around £4,000 to £13,500 depending on the length of stay and other factors.
    What is the average time for codeine rehab?
    Typically, a twenty-eight-day treatment programme is recommended for individuals undergoing codeine rehab. It is important to stay for the duration of your treatment programme so that you may reap both the physical and psychological benefits. For particularly acute cases, a longer treatment programme may be advisable.
    What types of therapies/treatments are used in codeine rehab?
    There are several different methods used in the treatment of codeine abuse. Your treatment provider might utilise a combination of medication, cognitive and behavioural therapies, and holistic treatments. A combined approach is preferable as it helps to treat the mind, body, and spirit of the affected person as a whole instead of treating just the illness itself.
    How do I support a loved one during codeine rehab?
    You may be experiencing a rollercoaster of emotions if you have a loved one going through codeine rehab. In order to help them, you should educate yourself on addiction so that you may have a better understanding of what they’re going through. It is also important to participate in family counselling and remain supportive throughout their recovery.
    How much does codeine rehab cost?
    The cost of codeine rehab may vary depending on several factors, including the type and location of the facility and the length of your treatment programme. On average, a 4-6-week programme is likely to cost anywhere between £4,000 and £13,500. Get in touch with our friendly admission team to know more about rehab cost and the options available.
    Where can I find a codeine rehab programme?
    Our nationwide UKAT facilities all offer a calm and therapeutic environment designed to meet your needs. If you would like to discuss your treatment options, contact us via phone or live chat for more details.
    How long does ecstasy rehab take?
    Treatment plans may vary depending on the severity of your drug abuse and your own personal needs, but typically we recommend a twenty-eight-day rehab programme. This allows you to fully establish new habits and gives you a better chance of success.
    Where can I find ecstasy rehab programmes?
    UKAT has a number of rehab treatment centres nationwide, all with a wealth of expertise in ecstasy addiction treatment. Contact us today on 0808 258 0864 to find your nearest clinic.
    Are there any risks regarding ecstasy rehab?
    There are always risks involved with any drug detox and rehabilitation. However, taking part in an inpatient programme under the supervision of medical professionals minimises risks and ensures a comfortable, safe, and most importantly, successful experience.
    What is the success rate for ecstasy rehab?
    It is a common misconception that completing ecstasy rehab means the individual is “cured”. Recovery is, in fact, a lifelong journey that can include both ups and downs. Ecstasy rehab is successful in providing the tools needed to improve many aspects of your life and teaches lessons you can take forward as you continue your recovery.
    How do I know if I need ecstasy rehab?
    Perhaps your ecstasy use is causing problems with your health, relationships, finances, or employment. If so, ecstasy rehab is the right decision for you. If you are finding yourself unable to cut back, or continue taking ecstasy regardless of the negative consequences it is causing then it is time to seek professional help.
    Does rehab treat opiate addiction withdrawal?
    Yes, opiate rehab treats your withdrawal symptoms during your detox. The medical team will provide medication and support to alleviate the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.
    How much does opiate rehab cost?
    Inpatient opiate rehab can vary in cost depending on your treatment plan and the length of your stay. For an accurate quote on the cost of rehab treatment, get in touch with a member of our friendly and professional admissions team.
    When to go to opiate rehab?
    You should go to opiate rehab as soon as you feel ready to make a change and start living your life without being dependent on opiates or opioids. Opiate addiction treatment offers you the opportunity to remove opiates from your system and gain a new perspective on life, encouraging you to pursue your dreams and life goals.
    Where can I find a tramadol rehab centre?
    UKAT has a number of tramadol rehab centres across the UK which are easily accessible from anywhere in the country. They include:

    How do I support a loved one during tramadol rehab?
    If you have a loved one in tramadol rehab, the best thing you can do is to support their decision to get help and be there for them during this difficult time. When they finish rehab, try to create a home environment that is conducive to recovery. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for help yourself if you are struggling to cope.
    How long does tramadol rehab last?
    Tramadol rehab can take anywhere from 28 days to several months depending on the severity of the addiction and other factors such as mental health issues and whether the person is in a residential or outpatient programme.
    What type of therapies are used in rehab for veterans?
    UKAT rehab clinics provide veterans in rehab with various therapy types, including trauma therapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and 12-step therapy, alongside group and private therapy to encourage connection and support in recovery. However, different private and public rehabs will offer different treatments.
    Does UKAT provide rehab treatment programmes specifically for veterans?
    No, UKAT does not have a rehab programme specifically for veterans. However, we are in contact with certain Armed Forces charities that offer discounted rates to rehab programmes for veterans that tackle substance abuse, drug abuse, anxiety disorders and traumas that have resulted from time in service. We also have various substance and drug rehab programmes that are very welcoming to veterans.
    What happens after veterans attend rehab?
    UKAT offers one year’s free aftercare and access our Alumni Community so veterans will be able to live a healthy lifestyle while also being continually supported by those on the same journey. They can also attend support groups to build a more solid support network.
    Where can I find a heroin rehab centre?
    Heroin rehab centres can be found all over the UK, and UKAT has eight centres to choose from. You will also be able to find support groups near you that will help you come to terms with the difficult situation that you are in. Support groups near you may be able to point you towards a tried and tested heroin rehab centre.
    Are medications used during heroin rehab treatment?
    Carefully measured and scientifically approved medication, such as small amounts of heroin and additional pain killers, are used in the detox segment of heroin rehab to mitigate the detrimental effects of withdrawal.
    Why is heroin rehab important?
    Heroin is, unfortunately, an extremely dangerous opiate that can and has countlessly resulted in fatalities by overdose. Eliminating your reliance on heroin and the risk associated with its use is extremely important for your well-being.
    Is heroin rehab treatment really effective?
    When treating the underlying psychological reasons behind heroin abuse, in addition to the physical withdrawal symptoms that come with heroin treatment, you can be sure that the impact of heroin rehab treatment can last for a long time. However, it will always come down to you first and foremost, as you hold the power to stay clean or choose heroin as a coping mechanism.
    What therapies or treatments are used in heroin rehab?
    UKAT uses holistic approach treatments such as acupuncture and music therapy in addition to group and individual therapy in our heroin rehab treatment.
    Can I have a heroin treatment at home?
    You can undergo heroin treatment at home. However, it is risky and can put your loved one’s life in danger. Since heroin causes physical and psychological dependence, the sudden discontinuation of its intake can cause your system to go into shock and can render the detox process potentially fatal.
    How can I get into an NHS rehab?
    You need to contact your GP for advice about seeking addiction treatment. Alternatively, there are various organisations that specialise in assisting people struggling with an addiction, and there will likely be treatment services in your local area that can offer support.
    Are there any other organisations that offer free treatment besides the NHS?
    Yes. With a number of charities that specialise in helping those who suffer from addiction, those within the local community are a great resource to get you on the road to recovery. While this will be dependent on where you live and what treatment you seek, you can find organisations that may help.
    Does the NHS offer inpatient treatment?
    While outpatient addiction treatment is available for free through the NHS, they offer inpatient treatment for services like medical detox, and residential rehabilitation is only available through referral to other private addiction centres.
    How will I know if I’m experiencing Valium withdrawal?
    Physical dependence on Valium can occur when this substance is abused. If you stop taking Valium and begin to experience symptoms such as anxiety, mood swings, headaches, and nausea, it is likely that you are experiencing withdrawal.
    Is Valium withdrawal dangerous?
    Valium withdrawal can cause significant danger to your health if you begin to experience severe withdrawal symptoms. Sadly, symptoms such as respiratory distress and seizures can sometimes be fatal. This is why you should never attempt Valium detox alone. Always seek professional medical assistance to detox from Valium safely.
    Does Valium withdrawal cause depression?
    There are many different symptoms associated with Valium withdrawal, depression being one of them. This can be the result of the sudden drop in GABA, the neurotransmitter that your brain has become dependent upon for feelings of calmness and contentment. Depression can also be a Valium withdrawal symptom for those who experience PAWS, as they often feel as if there is no end to their symptoms.
    How do I minimise Valium withdrawal symptoms?
    The best way to minimise Valium withdrawal is to gradually reduce your dosage over time. Sudden cessation of Valium can be extremely dangerous and cause severe withdrawal symptoms. Tapering your dose slowly over the course of several weeks or months will help prevent severe symptoms from occurring.
    How does rehab help to ease Valium withdrawal?
    At an inpatient detox facility, your comfort and safety are assured. Highly-trained staff and drug addiction support workers will monitor your progress at all times and offer medical and emotional support to help ease any withdrawal symptoms. You will also be provided with medication, nutritional supplements, and relaxation therapies to ease you out of Valium withdrawal and refocus your energy on addiction recovery.
    Which drug has the most withdrawal symptoms?
    Benzodiazepines, heroin, and crack cocaine are notoriously difficult to quit and can lead to severe and even life-threatening drug withdrawal symptoms. You may experience delusions and hallucinations that can lead to self-harm, and you may also be at risk of seizures during withdrawal.
    Is drug detox dangerous?
    Drug withdrawal symptoms are not only mild discomforts. They can have dangerous, and even life-threatening outcomes. Not only that, but the risk of relapse is high during drug detox as symptoms and cravings intensify, so it’s not worth the risk.
    Is drug detox painful?
    You may experience some pain during drug detox and withdrawal, including sensitive skin, headaches, tightness in the chest, gastrointestinal issues, and muscular aches and pains. If you undergo a medically assisted detox, your symptoms will be treated and you will experience a far more comfortable detox.
    What does benzo withdrawal feel like?
    Benzo withdrawal may induce unpleasant physical and emotional symptoms such as nausea, stomach cramps, depression anxiety and panic attacks. These are all completely normal withdrawal symptoms for most people, and should begin to wane after the first few weeks of benzo detox.
    How long does benzo withdrawal last?
    Benzo withdrawal symptoms can last anywhere between a few days to several months, sometimes even a year. The length of benzo withdrawal often depends on the extent of your benzo abuse and whether you have been taking short-acting or long-acting benzodiazepines.
    Does benzo detox cause rebound anxiety?
    Benzo detox can involve withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety and intense cravings, which may lead to concerns that you may rebound after detox. However, if you receive professional treatment at rehab, you will receive medical attention and emotional support to help you manage the severity of your withdrawal symptoms.
    Which benzodiazepines does UKAT provide detox for? 
    At our eight UKAT clinics, we provide benzodiazepine detox for a range of benzo drugs. These include Valium detox, Xanax detox, Ativan detox, Librium detox, Halcion detox, Mogadon detox, Klonopin detox and Temazepam detox.
    Day 1
    You will typically experience:

    • Anxiety
    • Depression
    • Fatigue
    Day 2
    You will typically experience:

    • Irritability
    • Mood Swings
    Day 3-7
    You will typically experience:

    • Sleep problems
    • Vivid dreams
    • Disorientated feelings
    Week 2
    You will typically experience:

    • Increased appetite
    • Mood swings peak
    • Irritability peaks
    Week 3 and onwards
    You will typically experience:

    • Feeling better
    • Increased confidence
    • Thinking becomes clearer
    • Sleep becomes more stable
    • Appetite is stable
    Hours 1-10
    The early symptoms:

    These earlier symptoms can range from aches and chills to anxiety and an inability to sleep. It is also common to experience intense cravings all the time.

    24-72 hours after last dose
    The peak symptoms:

    These symptoms can last up to a week after the last dose of fentanyl and those more severe physical symptoms will typically feel at their most intense during this period.

    Several weeks or months later
    The long-term symptoms:

    A few physical symptoms may continue to present themselves. This is known as post-acute withdrawal syndrome.

    Do I need treatment for my social media addiction?
    Whether you need social media addiction treatment depends on a number of factors, such as individual circumstances and needs. However, if you feel that your habit is getting in the way of your ability to lead a normal life, it might be time to start considering treatment.
    Is internet addiction the same as social media addiction?
    While internet addiction is an umbrella term that extends to different online behaviours, like gaming and cyber-relational addiction, social media addiction is specific to our relationship with social media sites.
    Are some people more at risk of developing social media addiction?
    With 90% of people aged 18-29 stating that they use social media in any form available, research suggests that young adults are the most at risk of developing some form of social media addiction.
    Is it normal to have porn addiction?
    While you might worry that it is somehow abnormal to suffer from this addiction, it is important to remember that the compulsion to watch porn is no different from a drug addict’s compulsion to take drugs. Watching porn is also fairly common, with a study reporting that at least half of the UK’s adult population watch it.
    Are sex addiction and porn addiction the same?
    While they may involve similar patterns of behaviour, sex addiction is more about the act of having intercourse, while porn addiction involves the compulsion to view pornographic content.
    What treatment is there for porn addiction?
    While a detox is not necessary for porn addiction, we provide extensive holistic treatments and talking therapies, all implemented to help overcome your affliction and start on the road to recovery. Some of these addiction therapies can include Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Individual Therapy and mindfulness.
    How long does it take to detox from Xanax?
    The Xanax detox and withdrawal period varies from person to person, and is dependent on a number of factors, including the addiction length and severity, the individual’s general health, previous attempts to quit, and their family history. Generally speaking, Xanax withdrawal can last from four to five days, however symptoms can persist for weeks, months, and even years in extreme cases.
    What does Xanax withdrawal feel like?
    Xanax withdrawal symptoms can vary from person to person. You may experience aches and pains, nausea, diarrhoea, depression and anxiety, irritability, feelings of panic, blurred vision, insomnia, fatigue, tremors, and reduced ability to concentrate.
    Could I have rebound anxiety from Xanax withdrawal?
    Rebound anxiety poses a risk to those who suddenly stop taking Xanax, seeing individuals experience an increase in the feelings they were initially trying to quell with Xanax.
    What is Xanax withdrawal syndrome?
    Xanax withdrawal syndrome refers to a set of symptoms that present themselves after the user begins reducing their dosage of Xanax. It is considered a syndrome because the symptoms occur together, and are associated with the same cause. A Xanax user is not considered suffering from Xanax withdrawal syndrome until all the primary symptoms are manifested.
    Why is Xanax detox important?
    Xanax detox is the first stage in your recovery, and lays the foundation for a successful outcome. Your body will expel any toxic substances as it learns to readjust and regain healthy balance. You will see notable benefits after Xanax detox, including better physical and mental wellbeing.
    Where can I find a Xanax detox clinic?
    Our nationwide UKAT facilities specialise in Xanax detox and ongoing treatment and can support your recovery every step of the way.
    Will my information be kept confidential during tramadol detox?
    Whoever delivers your tramadol detox has a duty to protect your privacy and to keep your information confidential. Whether you attend outpatient or inpatient detox, all members of staff are bound by strict confidentiality policies and will never share your details with a third party without your permission.
    How do I detox from tramadol?
    There are several ways to detox from tramadol. At a detox centre, your care team will advise on the most appropriate method for you. For example, one provider may recommend a tapering schedule to help your body adjust to living without tramadol dependency. Another provider may recommend opioid replacement therapy, during which you will be given a substitute opioid drug whilst you withdraw from tramadol.
    Can I die from tramadol withdrawal?
    If you return to tramadol after a period of abstinence, it is possible that you could suffer an overdose. This is because your tolerance level can drop dramatically even after just a few days of abstinence. However, if you undergo tramadol detox at an inpatient facility, it is far less likely that fatal complications will arise. During detox, your dosage will be carefully reduced by well-trained medical professionals.
    What do holistic therapists do?
    Holistic therapists are health practitioners with a vast knowledge of psychology. They aim to locate the root of the problem by bringing balance to a client’s physical, mental, and spiritual wellbeing. They use their expertise to give each client a bespoke treatment plan.
    What are the five steps of the holistic approach?
    The five steps of holistic treatment tend to vary from practitioner to practitioner. However, they all entail a similar pattern: physical healing, mental healing, spiritual healing, social healing, and emotional healing.
    Which UKAT centres offer holistic therapies?
    UKAT has eight CQC-approved centres across the country that treat various forms of substance and behavioural addiction. Each centre will offer you many holistic treatments and therapies to help you recover. You can call us today, and our helpful advisors can discuss each in more detail.
    What are the four types of intervention?
    There are four types of interventions, all available for different purposes. Simple and Classic interventions involve friends and family coming together to discuss their concerns about their loved one’s addiction. Family system intervention is available for families struggling with co-dependency, and Crisis interventions happen immediately and in response to a loved one putting themselves in dangerous situations.
    Do interventions work?
    If you are a family member or friend of someone suffering from addiction, you might want to learn more about whether they are successful. While interventions do have a high success rate in terms of getting addicts to seek treatment, you should know that just because your addicted loved one might agree to access help, there is no guarantee that he or she will agree to accept treatment.
    Should I only stage an intervention if my loved one has hit rock bottom?
    While it was once accepted within the arena of addiction recovery that a person must reach ‘rock bottom’ before being treated, experience and research show that this is not the case. We have learned that, with some help, facing problems before things get too bad can be incredibly useful.
    What are the most addictive sleeping pills?
    The most commonly used sleeping pills are Zopiclone, Zolpidem and Diazepam. Due to the frequency of use, these are the pills that most often lead to addiction. However, it is possible to become addicted to any type of sleeping pill.
    How quickly can you get addicted to sleeping pills?
    It is possible to become addicted to sleeping pills after just a few weeks of use. However, most people will develop a tolerance over time and will need to take larger doses to get the same effect. This tolerance eventually leads to dependence and finally to sleeping pill addiction.